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6 Examples: How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

By Status.net Editorial Team on December 25, 2023 — 11 minutes to read

Addressing the recipient without knowing their name might seem complicated, but there are ways to navigate this situation. Let’s take a look at a few strategies to make your cover letter feel personalized even when you don’t have a specific name to address.

Be Professional and Engaging

Using general salutations like “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” can make your cover letter feel impersonal. Instead, opt for a more engaging opener such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear [Company Name] Team.” This type of greeting acknowledges the company and shows that you have researched the team you are addressing.

Focus on the Position and Company

Make sure to tailor the content of your cover letter to the job you are applying for by highlighting relevant qualifications, experience, and skills. Share specific examples of your successes that align with the responsibilities of the position. Mention the company’s values, goals, or recent successes to demonstrate how your values align with theirs. This can effectively showcase your interest and commitment to the role.

Use LinkedIn and Company Website Research

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name in the job posting, you can turn to LinkedIn or the company website for clues. Search for professionals working in human resources or hiring roles at the company. If you find a specific contact, address your letter to that person while using their full name and title. Otherwise, continue with a professional and engaging salutation as mentioned earlier.

Here are two examples of how to start a cover letter without a name:

Dear Hiring Manager, As a passionate marketer with five years of experience, I am excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company. Achieving a 30% increase in leads generated through my previous campaigns, I am eager to contribute to the growth of your marketing department.
Dear ABC Inc. Team, With a strong background in project management and a proven track record of implementing cost-saving strategies, I am confident in my ability to excel as the Senior Project Manager at ABC Inc. Your company’s commitment to sustainable practices aligns with my values and I am thrilled to be considered for this opportunity.

By applying these strategies, you can create an impactful and personalized cover letter, even without knowing the recipient’s name. This attention to detail can set you apart from other applicants and leave a positive impression with your prospective employer.

How to Find the Hiring Manager’s Name

Sometimes locating the hiring manager’s name can be tricky, but there are several ways to find it. Let’s go through a few methods to help you address your cover letter without a name.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great resource for finding the hiring manager’s name. Here’s how you can use it:

  • Visit the company’s LinkedIn page.
  • Click on the “People” tab to browse through the employees.
  • Use the search bar and enter keywords such as “recruiter,” “hiring manager,” or the department you’re applying to.
  • Check the found profiles, and try to identify the right person responsible for hiring in your desired role.

Make sure to double-check that the person is currently working in the company to avoid using outdated information.

Checking Company Website

Another way to find the hiring manager’s name is by checking the company website:

  • Locate the “About Us” or “Team” page, where you might find a list of employees along with their titles and roles.
  • Look for a person who has a recruiting or hiring-related title within the department you’re targeting with your application.
  • If you cannot find the necessary information on the website, try checking a company’s press releases or blog. Sometimes they include names of important team members.

Making a Phone Call

When all else fails, you’re left with one more option – making a phone call.

  • Call the company’s main line and politely ask the receptionist for the name of the hiring manager or the person responsible for recruitment in the department you’re interested in.
  • Be prepared to provide the job title and a job reference number (if available) to help the receptionist find the right person.

Finding the hiring manager’s name isn’t always possible. If you cannot locate it, don’t worry. Addressing your cover letter as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” is still better than not sending a cover letter at all.

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: Sample Phrases

Starting with job title.

When you cannot find the recipient’s name, use their job title to address the cover letter. This shows that you can connect and direct your message to the relevant person. Here are some examples:

  • Dear Hiring Manager, – This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name.
  • Dear [Job Title], – Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director .
  • To the [Job Title] Selection Committee, – This approach can be useful when applying for a role advertised by a team or committee that will handle the hiring process, such as To the Scholarship Selection Committee .

Referring to Department

Another approach is to address the cover letter to the department that the position is within. This helps to direct your message to the appropriate team or group. Here are some examples:

  • Dear [Department] Team, – Mention the department you are applying for, such as Dear HR Team, or Dear Sales Team .
  • Greetings, [Department] Department, – Use the department name to address the letter, like Greetings, IT Department .
  • To Whom It May Concern in the [Department], – This is a formal alternative when you don’t know the recipient or department’s name, for example, To Whom It May Concern in the Finance Department .

Using these approaches will ensure that your cover letter appears professional and well-directed, even when you don’t have the exact name of the recipient. Focus on the content and the skills you bring to the position to make the best impression on the reader.

Crafting Content for Cover Letters

When you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you might feel a little lost on how to address your cover letter. Don’t worry. You can still create an engaging and professional cover letter that gets the job done. Here are some tips and examples to help you craft the perfect content for an anonymous cover letter.

Start with a professional, yet friendly, greeting. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, use a general opening line such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” . These greetings are widely accepted and show respect towards the person receiving the letter.

Next, dive into your strengths, skills, and achievements. Mention the qualifications that make you a strong candidate for the position. Share relevant accomplishments from your previous roles, such as leading a successful project or boosting sales. Be specific when describing your skills and use quantifiable results when possible. For example:

“During my time at Company (…), I managed a team of 10 and successfully increased sales by 25% within six months.”

Show enthusiasm for the job and demonstrate your knowledge of the company. Research the organization’s goals, values, and recent projects, then incorporate this information into your cover letter. This will help you tailor your letter to the company’s needs and show that you’d be a good fit for their culture. You could say something like:

“As a long-time admirer of your company’s commitment to sustainability, I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute to the upcoming eco-conscious product line.”

Close your cover letter with a strong call-to-action. Express your interest in further discussing your qualifications and offer your availability for an interview. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application and include your contact information. A sample closing paragraph could look like this:

“I’m eager to discuss how my expertise in digital marketing could contribute to the success of your team. Thank you for considering my application. You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or [email protected] to schedule a conversation.”

Keep your cover letter concise and focused on your unique selling points. Even without knowing the recipient’s name, following these guidelines will allow you to create a memorable and attention-grabbing cover letter that leaves a lasting impression on potential employers.

Tips on Prefix Usage

When you’re addressing a cover letter without a specific name, it’s good to think about the appropriate prefix to use. Here are some tips to help you choose the right one:

First, consider using a general and gender-neutral prefix like Dear Hiring Manager . It will work well if you don’t know the recipient’s name or aren’t aware of their gender. This is a widely accepted way to address a cover letter without a specific name.

Dear Hiring Manager, I came across your job posting for a Graphic Designer, and I am excited to apply for the role.

If you happen to know the job title of the person who will read your cover letter, you can use it. This shows that you have put effort into researching the company and position.

Dear Marketing Director, I am writing to express my interest in the open Digital Marketing Specialist position at your company.

In some cases, you might know the name of the department that the job is in. In this case, you can address your cover letter to the entire department.

Dear Finance Team, I was thrilled to see an opening for a Financial Analyst at your company and would like to apply for the position.

When you’re unable to find any specific details or when addressing a larger company, you can opt for a broad salutation like To Whom It May Concern . Just be aware that it may come off as impersonal, so it’s best to use this as a last resort.

To Whom It May Concern, I am submitting my application for the Content Writer position posted on your careers website.

The key is to maintain a professional tone throughout your cover letter. Regardless of which prefix you choose, always customize your content to suit the specific job and company you’re applying to. By doing so, you demonstrate a genuine interest in the role and leave a positive impression on the hiring manager.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Sending a cover letter without addressing it to a specific person can be a pitfall. It might make the recipient feel unimportant or signal that you didn’t do your research. To make your application stand out, be mindful of these common mistakes:

  • Not being specific about the role: Your cover letter should not only address the person but also the specific role you’re applying for. Tailor your letter according to the job and the company. For instance, instead of writing “I wish to apply for the marketing position”, be more specific like “I am interested in applying for the Digital Marketing Specialist role at [CompanyName].”
  • Focusing too much on yourself: Although your achievements are important, the cover letter should focus on how your skills can benefit the company. Frame your accomplishments in a way that highlights the value you can bring to the organization.
  • Being overly formal or stiff: While it’s important to maintain a professional tone, being too formal might come across as insincere or impersonal. Use a friendly tone and avoid jargon or buzzwords to keep your cover letter genuine and relatable.
  • Spelling errors and typos: Even the smallest of typos can create a negative impression. Double-check your cover letter to make sure there are no mistakes. Keep an eye out for incorrect spellings, especially when addressing the recipient.

The goal of your cover letter is to make a personal connection and showcase how you are a great fit for the company. Taking the time to address your letter properly, proofread for errors, and customize your content demonstrates your attention to detail and commitment to the position.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i properly address a cover letter when the recipient’s name is unknown.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, consider using a general salutation instead. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruitment Team” acknowledges the recipient without using a specific name. You can also research the company’s website or LinkedIn to try to find the appropriate contact person.

What alternatives are there to ‘To Whom It May Concern’?

There are several alternatives to ‘To Whom It May Concern’ that can help make your cover letter stand out:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Company] Team
  • Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team
  • Dear [Company] Recruitment Team

How do I determine the appropriate salutation for my cover letter?

To determine the right salutation for your cover letter, do a bit of research on the company or organization you’re targeting. This may help you uncover the specific department or hiring manager’s name. If not, use one of the general salutations mentioned earlier to address your cover letter in a more personalized manner.

What are examples of cover letter openings without using names?

Here are some examples of cover letter openings without using specific names:

  • “Dear Hiring Manager, I am excited to submit my application for the [Job Title] position at [Company].”
  • “Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team, As a passionate professional with experience in [Industry], I am eager to contribute to [Company] as a [Job Title].”
  • “Dear [Company] Team, I recently came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company], and I am confident that my skills and experience make me a strong candidate.”

How can I avoid common mistakes when addressing cover letters without names?

To avoid mistakes when addressing cover letters without names, follow these tips:

  • Do thorough research on the company and the job posting
  • Be concise and professional in your language
  • Use an appropriate general salutation if you can’t find a specific name
  • Double-check for spelling and grammatical errors before sending the cover letter
  • Avoid using outdated or overused phrases, such as ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir/Madam’

By following these guidelines, you can create a strong and effective cover letter that stands out to hiring managers, even if you don’t have a specific name to address.

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No Name? No Company Address? Here’s How to Address Your Cover Letter

Cover letter.

You were almost done with your application, but approaching the finish line, you hit a snag. How are you supposed to write a cover letter without the company address? How about a cover letter without the name of the hiring manager? You don’t want to make a bad first impression, and you don’t want your application to be misplaced. Fortunately, there are a few ways around this.

Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Letters are a type of social interaction, so it’s best to address letters to their recipient. But, if you don’t know the name of the person receiving your resume and cover letter, you do have options:

  • Do some light research. Before addressing a letter to an unknown recipient, start by searching the company websites for the name of hiring managers, recruiters, and HR employees. You can also search through LinkedIn, or by using GlassDoor’s interview section. For many smaller organizations, it’s also possible to email and ask.  
  • Keep it professional. Sometimes your research won’t turn up anything and you’ll be left without a name to address. In that case, instead of addressing the letter to an individual, you can address the letter to the job title of the reader. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager of [Company].” If you can’t narrow down a job title, there’s always “To whom it may concern.”

Addressing a Cover Letter without a Company Address

Companies with several locations may have multiple addresses. Companies involved with remote work may have no address at all. When writing a cover letter without an address, you have several options:

  • Double-check for an address online. You may not have found it immediately, but diligent research can often turn up results. Consider checking the contact/about section of a company’s website, or searching for a Google My Business listing. Beyond that, you may also consider contacting the Department of Revenue to learn their state location, and follow up with their local chamber of commerce.  
  • Use the address of the company headquarters. It’s descriptive, professional, and better than leaving the address blank. This approach often makes sense for remote work, and for larger organizations where applications are passed through an HR department.  
  • Use their P.O. box number. If you can’t find a headquarters address, using a P.O. box number is the next best thing. Like with a headquarters address, it shows you made an effort.  
  • Leave the address blank. While an address can help prevent busy HR departments from misplacing your letter, outside of those circumstances, going without an address on your cover letter is not a grievous mistake. Hiring managers usually have more important things to worry about.

Find More Interview Advice on the MyPath Blog

Taking these kinds of small steps can help probably won’t define you as a candidate, but they can fine-tune your application for success. For your next step, you’ll want to learn how to Describing Yourself in an Interview , master the “Strengths and Weaknesses” Question , and then Crafting a Post-Interview Follow-Up Email .

There’s always more you can learn to set yourself on the path for career success. If you’re still searching for the right career path, try our Career Wizard Tool to see how your abilities and interests may align with a career in risk management.

20 Examples Of How To Address a Cover Letter to an Unknown Recipient

Introduction.

Imagine sending out dozens of job applications, only to realize that you've been addressing your cover letters incorrectly. As it turns out, addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient can be a tricky task. In this comprehensive guide, we'll provide strategies for finding the right name, using job titles as an alternative, formatting the letter, avoiding common mistakes, leveraging professional networking, and understanding the importance of personalization. By following our advice, you can increase your chances of landing that job interview and making a great first impression.

Finding the Right Name

Before you give up on finding the recipient's name, consider these research strategies:

Check the job post for a specific name. Sometimes, the name of the hiring manager or contact person is listed in the job posting. Read the post carefully to see if a name is mentioned.

Search the company website for a company directory or listing of key personnel. Many organizations have a "Meet Our Team" or "About Us" section that introduces their staff members. Look for someone with a relevant title, such as "Hiring Manager" or "Human Resources Director."

Call the company directly and ask for the appropriate contact person. If you're unable to find the name online, consider calling the company and asking for the name of the person responsible for hiring for the position you're applying for. This approach can be particularly effective for smaller organizations.

Utilize professional networking platforms like LinkedIn to find the recipient. LinkedIn is a powerful tool for job seekers. Try searching for employees at the company with relevant titles, then check their profiles for clues about their role in the hiring process. You can learn more about how to find the name of the hiring manager using LinkedIn in this helpful article.

Personalize your cover letter. Addressing your cover letter to a specific individual shows that you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in the position. This extra effort can make a big difference in how your application is perceived by the recipient.

Using a Job Title

If you're unable to find the recipient's name, consider using a job title or department head as an alternative:

Address the letter to the job title of the reader. For example, you might write "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear Human Resources Director." This approach is more specific and professional than using a generic greeting like "To Whom It May Concern."

Consider addressing the letter to the head of the department where you're applying to work. If you know the department your job falls under, try addressing your cover letter to the department head, such as "Dear Marketing Director" or "Dear IT Manager."

Explain why using a job title or department head can still demonstrate professionalism and personalization. Although it's not as ideal as using a specific name, addressing your letter to a relevant job title shows that you've put some thought into your application and have a clear understanding of the company's structure.

Provide examples of different job titles to use as salutations. You can find a list of different job titles to use as salutations in this resource.

Discuss the potential impact of using job titles on the success of the job application. While using a job title may not guarantee success, it can increase your chances of making a favorable impression. A personalized salutation indicates that you're genuinely interested in the position and have taken the time to research the company.

Formatting the Letter

When addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient, follow these formatting tips:

Always use "Dear" to start the address. This is a professional and respectful way to begin a cover letter.

Use a gender-neutral title (such as Ms.) if the recipient's gender is unknown. If you're unsure of the recipient's gender, it's better to use a neutral title like "Ms." rather than making assumptions.

For non-gender-specific names, use the recipient's full name. If you can't determine the recipient's gender based on their name, address the letter using their full name, such as "Dear Taylor Smith."

Maintain a professional tone even when the name is unknown. Even if you don't know the recipient's name, it's crucial to keep your language and tone professional throughout your cover letter.

Provide examples of well-formatted cover letter salutations.

While it's always best to try and find the name of the hiring manager or recruiter, there may be times when you just can't find that information. Don't let it deter you. Below are 20 examples of how you can address your cover letter when the recipient is unknown:

1. Dear Hiring Manager, 2. To the Recruitment Team, 3. Dear Human Resources Team, 4. Attention Hiring Committee, 5. Dear [Job Title] Hiring Team, 6. To the [Company Name] Team, 7. Dear [Company Name] Recruiter, 8. To Whom It May Concern, 9. Dear Hiring Authority, 10. Attention [Company Name] Hiring Professionals, 11. Dear Talent Acquisition Team, 12. Hello [Company Name] Selection Panel, 13. Dear Recruitment Advisor, 14. To the [Industry] Professionals at [Company Name], 15. Attention [Company Name] Talent Scouts, 16. Dear Hiring Advocate, 17. To the Selection Committee for [Job Title], 18. Dear [Company Name] Staffing Team, 19. Attention [Job Title] Recruitment Panel, 20. Dear [Company Name] Hiring Panel,

Remember, the goal is to be as respectful and professional as possible in your salutation. Even if you don't know the recipient's name, demonstrating courtesy in your greeting will set a positive tone for the rest of your cover letter.

Also, avoid overly casual greetings like 'Hello' or 'Hi there,' which might seem unprofessional, and stay clear of outdated phrases such as 'Dear Sir or Madam.' Instead, opt for more modern, inclusive alternatives. Be sure to follow your greeting with a comma or a colon, then leave a space before starting the body of your letter.

Avoiding Common Mistakes

When addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient, it's essential to avoid these common mistakes:

Using generic greetings like "To Whom It May Concern." This phrase is outdated and impersonal, and using it can make your application seem generic and unprofessional. Instead, try to find a specific name or use a job title, as discussed in previous sections.

Using incorrect titles or making assumptions about the recipient's gender. Making assumptions about someone's gender or using an inappropriate title can potentially offend the recipient and hurt your chances of landing an interview. Stick to gender-neutral titles or use the recipient's full name when in doubt.

Addressing the letter to the wrong department or job title. Be sure to double-check that you're addressing your letter to the appropriate person or department. Sending your application to the wrong person can result in your application being overlooked or discarded.

Failing to proofread the cover letter for errors, even in the salutation. Typos and other errors can make a poor impression on the recipient. Be sure to proofread your entire cover letter, including the salutation, before submitting it.

Provide examples of mistakes that could hurt the applicant's chances of landing an interview. Some examples of common errors include misspelling the recipient's name, using an informal greeting (such as "Hey"), or addressing the letter to an unrelated department (e.g., "Dear Accounting Manager" when applying for a marketing position).

Utilizing Professional Networking

Leveraging your professional network can be an effective way to find the name of the recipient for your cover letter:

Use platforms like LinkedIn to research the company and its employees. As mentioned earlier, LinkedIn is a valuable resource for job seekers. You can use the platform to find employees with relevant titles, learn more about the company culture, and even discover mutual connections who might be able to provide an introduction or additional information.

Connect with current employees or alumni of the company. Networking with people who work at the company or have worked there in the past can give you valuable insights into the hiring process and help you identify the appropriate contact person for your cover letter.

Search for the appropriate contact person within your professional network. Use your connections to find people who work at the company you're applying to, and ask if they know who the hiring manager for your desired position is.

Networking can help job seekers get noticed by potential employers. Building relationships with people at the company can increase your chances of getting noticed and potentially even lead to a referral. Learn more about how networking can help job seekers get noticed by potential employers in this article.

Offer examples of successful job seekers who found the recipient's name through networking. For instance, this cover letter that landed a job seeker a role at LinkedIn is a great example of how personalizing your cover letter and leveraging your network can help you stand out.

Importance of Personalization

Personalizing your cover letter can make a significant difference in the success of your job application:

Discuss the impact of personalization on the reader's impression of the applicant. A personalized cover letter demonstrates that you've done your research and are genuinely interested in the position, which can make a positive impression on the recipient.

Provide statistics on the success rate of personalized cover letters compared to generic ones. According to resume statistics , candidates with typos in their cover letters or resumes are 58% more likely to be dismissed, while those who do not include specific employment dates are 27% more likely to be dismissed.

Offer expert opinions on the importance of addressing cover letters to specific individuals. Many career experts agree that addressing cover letters to specific individuals can increase your chances of landing an interview.

Explain how personalization demonstrates research skills and genuine interest in the company. Taking the time to research the recipient and tailor your cover letter to the specific position and company shows that you're not only a thorough and detail-oriented candidate, but also genuinely interested in the opportunity.

Share anecdotes of successful job seekers who personalized their cover letters and landed interviews. For example, one job seeker found the recipient's name through LinkedIn and personalized his cover letter , which helped him land an interview and ultimately secure the position.

Conclusion and Final Thoughts

In summary, addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient can be challenging, but by following our tips and strategies, you can make a strong impression on potential employers. Remember to:

  • Research the recipient's name or use a relevant job title.
  • Personalize your cover letter to demonstrate genuine interest in the position.
  • Maintain a professional tone and formatting throughout your cover letter.
  • Avoid common mistakes that can hurt your chances of landing an interview.
  • Leverage your professional network to find the appropriate contact person.

By applying these tips to your job search, you'll increase your chances of success and make a lasting impression on potential employers. Good luck with your job applications!

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10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

  • Cover Letter Format
  • Salutation and Greeting
  • Who To Address When Unknown
  • How To Start A Cover Letter
  • How To End A Cover Letter
  • Best Cover Letter Font And Size
  • Cover Letter Spacing
  • Cover Letter Length
  • Key Elements Of A Cover Letter
  • How To Write An Address
  • Official Letter Format
  • Cover Letter Opening

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Cover letters consume a fair amount of time in the application process, as the more personalized they are, the better. With the majority of the application process being automated and online now, the hiring manager ’s name can end up being an unknown quantity. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name and don’t know what to do, then this article will help you.

If the hiring manager’s name is unknown, then you have a few options. The best, of course, is to find out what their name is and address the letter to them. But if that all fails, then there are proper ways to address a cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Key Takeaways:

Try to find the name of the person you are addressing using the job listing, company website, or contacting the company.

Don’t assume someone’s martial status and avoid using “Miss” and “Mrs.” whenever possible.

Avoid assuming gender, even if you do know the person’s name.

Use a professional and appropriate greeting and avoid sounding like you would when addressing your friend.

Who to Address Cover Letter To if Unknown

How to address a cover letter if you don’t know the recipient’s name

Why is addressing a cover letter correctly important, how to find out who to address your cover letter to, example cover letter, addressing a cover letter faq, final thoughts, expert opinion.

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There are a few rules to follow when addressing a cover letter: be professional, polite, and concise. That means that even if you don’t know the recipient’s name, you want to maintain the same professional tone in the letter and avoid overly stilted language or being too informal.

Here are some guidelines to follow when addressing a cover letter:

If you can find out the hiring manager’s name, do so. That means that you should spend time looking over the company website, checking LinkedIn profiles, or even calling the company.

Don’t assume the hiring manager’s gender. This is especially true when you don’t know their name. But even if you do find out the person’s name, avoid gendered language until you’re sure how they identify. Some people will put preferred pronouns in email signatures or on their LinkedIn profiles, so it might be a good idea to check.

Maintain a professional tone. There’s a common style and formality to business letters. Make sure that your cover letter has that tone. it’s different than a letter you’d write to a friend, and being too familiar with your writing can be off-putting to hiring managers.

Avoid assuming the person’s title. This applies to both marital status, such as using Mrs. or Miss, but also whether they have a doctorate. In general, unless this is someone you know, avoid using either Mrs. or Miss, because it can cause offense, even if used correctly.

Make sure you include a salutation. Even if you don’t know who you’re addressing, leaving one off entirely can end up either looking like a mistake or that you didn’t personalize the letter at all.

Be as specific as possible. Even if you can’t find out exactly who the hiring manager is, make sure to be specific in your greeting. Use Dear Marketing Hiring Manager rather than just Dear Hiring Manager if you’re applying for a marketing position.

Also, while HR is most often in charge of hiring, it’s best not to just address the HR department unless you know that they’re the ones who’ll be in charge of your application. Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it’s a smaller company.

Examples of how to address a cover letter:

Dear Sir or Madam

Dear Hiring Manager

Dear Talent Acquisition Team

Dear [Company Name] HR Department

Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager

Dear Human Resources Manager

Dear Human Resources Department

Dear [Company Name] Recruiter

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Manager

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team

Here are some examples of how NOT to address a cover letter:

Good Morning

To Whom It May Concern

Dear Mrs. Smith

Hi Sebastian!

Hey Sales Team

Addressing a cover letter correctly shows professionalism, diligence, and politeness. All of these are good for an employee to have and show you to be someone that’s worth investing further time in. While finding the proper person to address can be a chore, it helps you in several ways because:

Hiring managers get myriad applications. Remember that you aren’t the only one applying for a job. While you want to make your application stand out from the crowd if you can, you don’t want to stand out in a negative way — that’ll ensure you don’t get the job.

Individual people ultimately decide who gets hired. While the application process can feel faceless, formless, and impersonal, there are actual people at these companies that sort through resumes . And people form first impressions.

It shows that you’re willing to go the extra mile. Think about what the admired traits are in employees. If you’re willing to put in the additional effort or work to get a superior result, then that’s the sort of employee companies want to have to work for them.

It’s less impersonal. Of course the hiring process is somewhat impersonal. You’re petitioning people you don’t know and that don’t know you. But if you address a letter to Dear Hiring Manager, it doesn’t have the same effect as addressing it directly to the person.

Despite the importance of properly addressing a cover letter, not every company makes it easy for applicants to do. If the hiring manager’s name isn’t immediately apparent, then there are some other options open to you before addressing the cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Check the job listing. One simple way is to look at the application and double-check that the hiring manager’s name isn’t on the main listing. Sometimes the information isn’t on the application, but rather on the job listing. If it isn’t there you will then have to start doing a little bit more investigative work.

Check LinkedIn. You can check on LinkedIn and on the company’s website to find the hiring manager’s name. If nothing shows up, then you will have to start contacting someone at the company to find out.

Contact the company. Now, this does not mean you should contact some random person at the company who lists the company’s name on their profile. Find the contact information for the HR department, for someone who works in HR, or for the head of the department you are trying to work in and ask them if they know the name of the hiring manager for your application.

Sometimes, they will not give this information, simply so that the hiring manager can stay anonymous and not get a billion emails from applicants. This situation is more likely to happen with massive companies like Google or Apple.

If they give you a name, use it. If they don’t, then you will have to then move on to the next step of figuring out how to address a cover letter to an unknown person.

How to write a cover letter

Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager, As a fan of XYZ Inc.’s impressive technology products, I was ecstatic to see an opening for a Junior Sales Representative . After reading the job description, I am confident that I’m the right person for the job. With 4 years of experience selling cloud computing products and services, I would bring a unique perspective to the role. In my current role as a Sales Representative at ABC Corp., I’ve created technology presentations for all my clients, driving interest in new product sales and subscriptions by 84% year-over-year. Additionally, I’ve reduced the cost of customer acquisition by over 15% and consistently topped sales quotas by over 20% since starting at ABC. I know XYZ has amazing products and services that I would be honored to promote and sell. With my background in cloud computing, I would be able to hit the ground running and communicate your product’s benefits to customers. Please contact me if you have any further questions about my application or resume. I look forward to speaking with the Sales Team more about the role in an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Malia Freeman [email protected] 555-777-9999

How do you address a cover letter to an unknown recipient?

Address your cover letter to “Hiring Manager” or “[Department Name] Hiring Manager.” Always do whatever you can to try to find the name of the person you’re addressing, but if you can’t, address it to the generic position or team you’re trying to get in contact with.

Is To Whom It May Concern rude?

Yes, To Whom It May Concern can be considered rude. Not everyone will agree that it’s rude, but many people do find it rude, or at least impersonal and lazy on a cover letter, so it’s best to avoid this greeting

Is it okay to use Dear Hiring Manager?

Yes, it is okay to use Dear Hiring Manager as a cover letter greeting. It’s always best to address your cover letter to someone by name if you can find it, but many times you can’t. In this case, “Dear Hiring Manager,” is an appropriate greeting.

Who is the best person to address a cover letter to?

The best person to address a cover letter to would be the hiring manager. This should be their first and last name if you know it, but “dear hiring manager” is acceptable if you are unsure of their name.

The rule of thumb was to use titles such as Mr. or Ms. However, it’s also important not to assume the hiring manager’s gender. If you don’t know the person’s preferred pronouns, then it’s best to just use their full name.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, how would you close the letter?

Sincerely or Regards are considered formal, professional closings for letters. If you’re writing a cover letter to someone you don’t know, it’s best to remain professional and polite. A sign-off such as best wishes will likely come off as too familiar.

If you are applying for a job and writing a cover letter, make sure you take the time to look over all the details in the cover letter. Not taking the time to look for the recipient of a cover letter or using a professional greeting will look lazy. ​ Your greeting is a small part of the cover letter. However, it’s one of the most important pieces because it’s the first thing the hiring managers will read. Using an appropriate generic greeting will set the tone for your cover letter, making you sound professional and willing to put in the effort to make your cover letter flawless. ​ Now that you know how to address a cover letter if the reader is the recipient is unknown, check out our other articles about cover letters and the job application process.

Applying for jobs can be stressful and tedious, but taking the time to learn tips on how to improve your application will help put you one step closer to landing your dream job .

Georgetown – Writing Cover Letters for Government

  • Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown

cover letter no person to address

Vimari Roman Career Strategist Coach Be Productive Coaching

My recommendation is to always send a customized cover letter when applying for any job and when in doubt, address your letter to the hiring team using “Dear Hiring Team.” In most cases the application will end up on a recruiter’s or an HR Business Partner’s desk, and if they like your cover letter and resume, then they will pass it on to the hiring manager or the hiring team. By addressing your letter to the “team” you’ve got everyone covered and they will all feel as if the letter was written directly to them.

Expert Tip To Find Contact Infoformation

cover letter no person to address

Sally Mikhail Founder of Recruit Petra LLC

Use LinkedIn to find out who to address your cover letter to you with a search of company personnel on the company careers page . However, if you are sending out a cover letter to an unknown hiring influence, you can address it to “Dear Hiring Team” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown Tip

cover letter no person to address

Chelsea Jay Certified Resume Writer and Career Coach

Make sure that you review the company’s “About Me” or “Staff” to view their leaders which often lists direct managers, HR professionals, and executive leadership staff. If you know what department you’ll be working for, I recommend addressing the leader of that department. If the website is for a larger organization and does not list individual staff, I recommend utilizing LinkedIn. You can do a quick company search and find employees who are currently working there. You may even find the original posting with the hiring manager’s name attached.

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name based on the posting, I recommend taking time to learn more about the specific department you’ll be working in. For example, if you discover that you’ll be working in the Communications department, the next step would be to learn about the specific team you’ll be part of. If you find out that it is the Public Affairs team, I encourage you to address “Public Affairs Team” at the beginning of your cover letter.

If you’re up for a bolder approach that is sure to get attention, address someone on the executive leadership team. I recommend addressing the President or Vice President of the organization (they should be easy to find since they are often the “face” of the organization). Of course, address them with a salutation along with their first name, last name, and title. In the beginning of the cover letter make sure to distinguish what department and position you are applying for. For example, Dear Mr. John Smith, President.

As an applicant, your goal is to stand out and showcase that you are informed and willing to go the extra mile (by doing research!).

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Heidi Cope is a former writer for the Zippia Career Advice blog. Her writing focused primarily on Zippia's suite of rankings and general career advice. After leaving Zippia, Heidi joined The Mighty as a writer and editor, among other positions. She received her BS from UNC Charlotte in German Studies.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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How To Address A Cover Letter (With Examples)

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How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

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Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

  • Letter Without a Contact Person
  • Non-Gender-Specific Names

What Title to Use

  • Address an Email Cover Letter
  • Review a Sample Cover Letter

Before You Send Your Letter

One of the trickiest parts of writing a cover letter comes at the very beginning. Much of the time, you won’t know exactly who will read your letter. How do you address your cover letter when you don’t have the contact person’s name and/or gender ?

First of all, try to find out the name of the contact person. Some employers will think poorly of an applicant who does not take the time to learn the hiring manager’s name. Also, take care not to assume that you know the gender of the recipient based on the name. Many names are gender-neutral, and some hiring managers may identify as a gender other than male or female.

It’s also possible that you’ll do your research and still be unable to figure out to whom you are addressing your letter. In that case, it's better to be safe and use a generic greeting . It's also acceptable to start a letter without a greeting and start with the first paragraph of your letter .

You have a lot of options when addressing your letter. Learn more about the possibilities before you make your choice.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

There are a variety of general cover letter salutations you can use to address your letter. These general cover letter salutations do not require you to know the name of the hiring manager.

In a survey of more than 2,000 companies, Saddleback College found that employers preferred the following greetings:  

  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern  (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Do keep in mind that terms like "To Whom It May Concern" may seem dated, so the best options may be either to use "Dear Hiring Manager" or not to include a greeting at all. Simply start with the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender-Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, one option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation, without a title that reveals gender:

  • Dear Sydney Doe
  • Dear Taylor Smith
  • Dear Jamie Brown

With these types of gender-ambiguous names,  LinkedIn  can be a helpful resource. Since many people include a photo with their profile, a simple search of the person's name and company within LinkedIn could potentially turn up the contact's photograph.

Again, you can also check the company website or call the company’s administrative assistant to get more information as well.

Even if you know the name and gender of the person to whom you are writing, think carefully about what title you will use in your salutation.

For example, if the person is a doctor or holds a Ph.D., you might want to address your letter to “Dr. Lastname” rather than “Ms. Lastname” or “Mr. Lastname.” Other titles might be “Prof.,” “Rev.,” or “Sgt.,” among others.

When you address a letter to a female employer, use the title “Ms.” unless you know for certain that she prefers another title (such as “Miss” or “Mrs.”).

“Ms.” is a general title that does not denote marital status, so it works for any female employer.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it, or it could end up in their spam mailbox. Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the  subject line of your email message , so the employer knows what job you are interested in. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

How to Address the Contact Person

There are a variety of  cover letter salutations  you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can  determine the email recipient's name .

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and  start with the first paragraph  of your letter or use a  general salutation .

How to Format the Salutation

Once you have chosen a salutation, follow it with a colon or comma, a space, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Hiring Manager:

First paragraph of the letter.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter  lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for.

When you're sending an  email cover letter , it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume.

Make sure that your email cover letters are as well-written as any other documents you send.

If you have attached your resume, mention this as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow up. Include a closing, then list your name and your  email signature .

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and  LinkedIn Profile URL  (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname  Street Address  (optional) City, State Zip Code  Email  Phone  LinkedIn

Sample Cover Letter

This is a cover letter example. Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 mary.garcia@email.com

February 17, 2021

Franklin Lee

CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060

Dear Mr. Lee:

I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

I have five years of experience as an operations assistant/associate. In my most recent role at ABC Corp., I fulfilled orders, resolved customer issues, ordered supplies, and prepared reports. In previous roles, I’ve done bookkeeping, data entry, and sales support. Basically, anything your department needs to run smoothly, I can do – and most likely, I already have experience doing it.

My other skills include:

  • Strong communication skills, in person, in writing, and on the phone
  • Excellent attention to detail and organization skills
  • Top-notch customer service
  • Experience in the industry and passion for the product
  • Adept at all the usual professional software, including Microsoft Office Suite

I’ve included my resume for your review. Please contact me if you have questions or would like to schedule an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Mary Garcia

Review Cover Letter Samples: It’s hard to write cover letters from scratch. To make life easier – and to make sure you don’t forget any of those pesky formatting rules —start by reviewing cover letter samples . Sending an email version instead? Look at a few examples of email cover letters to get started.

Customize Your Cover Letter: Why personalize your cover letter every time you apply for a job? Because even similar job titles have different requirements. The goal of a cover letter is to show the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for this particular job. Customizing your cover letter will help you emphasize your skills and experience and how they fit with the job requirements .

Spell-Check Names: Before sending your cover letter, make absolutely sure that you have spelled the hiring manager’s name correctly. That is the kind of small error that can cost you a job interview.

Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

Saddleback College. " Your Resume is Your 1st Interview ," Page 14. Accessed Feb. 17, 2021.

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How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Cover letters can be a bit of an art form when they include the proper salutation to their recipient. Since you’re creating your own cover letter and don’t have a name to address it to, you might feel a little stuck.

Don’t worry; there are plenty of ways to still address your cover letter appropriately, even if you don’t have this information readily available.

Let’s take a look at five different ways on how to address a cover letter without a name.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Table of Contents

5 Popular Ways to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

How long a cover letter should be is important somehow. What matters is that it is addressed directly to someone specific, such as Dear Mr. Jones or Dear Recruiter.

If there is no name in the email asking you to submit your cover letter, then try these five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name:

List of salutations when you don't know the name

1. To the Hiring Manager

If you don’t know who will be reading your cover letter, it’s best to start with To the hiring manager and follow that up with a more personal introduction. These words should sound professional so that they’re easy for whoever is reading them to digest while they’re reviewing your resume/cover letter.

For example:

To the Hiring Manager: I am writing to you because I am interested in the position of __. I have seen that you are looking for candidates and my qualifications seem to be a good fit. I believe that I have what it takes to do this job well. Please find my CV attached for your review and consideration. Thank you so much for your time, and looking forward to your response. If you have any questions about anything, please feel free to contact me at __. I’m happy to answer any questions and provide additional information as needed.

2. Dear Hiring Manager

It is important to address the cover letter recipient with a formal greeting. And when making cover letters, the most commonly used term is Dear, which is often used before the recipient’s name.

Since this is a formal greeting, any titles that follow should use this style. If possible, avoid salutations that are gender specific. Also, avoid informal salutations, such as those that include the words Hi and Hello.

It is important that you specify what kind of work experience you have in the cover letter and why this job is right for you. Let the Hiring Manager know that they can reach out to you anytime during their application process if they want to talk more about it.

Lastly, make sure that you end your cover letter properly.

Dear Hiring Manager, I hope you’re having a great day! I’m writing in response to your recent posting. My name is __, and I’m excited about the possibility of working with you. I noticed that the company is looking for someone who has experience in __ , and I would love to share my qualifications with you. Feel free to contact me at _ so we can talk more about it. Thank you for your time, and have a great day!

3. Dear [Company Name]

There are a lot of reasons why you might not have a name in your cover letter. Maybe you’re applying for a job, and the company hasn’t been formally named yet, or maybe you’ve applied to an organization that doesn’t use names in their communications.

Whatever the reason, it can be tricky to address your cover letter without a name. But that doesn’t have to be a cause of headaches. In such a case, use Dear Company Name.

  • Are Cover Letters Necessary?
  • How Long Should a Cover Letter Be?

This option is the best way to go if the company has already publicly announced its name. For example, you can say, “Dear Google”.

For example: Dear Google, I’m writing this cover letter to apply for the __ role. [Add career highlights and other relevant experiences.] Please feel free to reach out to me with any questions that you may have. Enjoy the rest of the day!

Hello is one of the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name. If you are making your cover letter formal, use Dear Hiring Manager, but if you are using a more casual tone, try something like Hello.

If you know who will be reviewing your application, it’s also appropriate to use their name in the salutation.

For example: Hello Hiring Manager, My name is __. I hope you’re doing well. I was reading your job listing and noticed that you’re looking for someone to fill the position of (job title). I’m very interested in this opportunity because __. Thank you for taking the time to read my cover letter, and I’d love to learn more about your company, so feel free to reach out if there’s anything else you need from me!

5. Dear Sir or Madam

Finding the right words when creating a cover letter you will send to an unknown person or company is always difficult. But there are many ways to address your cover letter that will have your potential employer reading it and considering you for the position. Dear Sir or Madam is just one example.

The use of Dear is typically seen as a more formal way to address your cover letter, and Sir or Madam is used when you don’t know the gender of the person reading your correspondence. When in doubt, stick with these two options for addressing a cover letter without knowing the recipient’s name.

However, this is only ideal if you know the gender of the hiring manager but don’t know their name. If you are not sure whether the hiring manager is he or she, consider using a gender-neutral salutation.

Dear Sir/Madam, I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to apply for the __ position you recently posted on the __ job site. I am confident that my knowledge, skills, and experience would be an asset to your awesome team. I am enclosing my resume/CV for your consideration. Thank you very much for taking the time to read my letter and considering me for this opportunity.

Other Salutations to Use When You Don’t Have a Name

There are many different ways to start a cover letter , but if you don’t have the name of the person you are addressing, then it can be difficult to come up with a good opening.

The most common way to address someone in a cover letter is by using their title and last name. If this isn’t possible, there are other ways that you can use as well. One way is to start off with any of the salutations mentioned above. Another option is to start off with these options:

  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team
  • To the Recruiting Team
  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Human Resources Manager
  • Dear [Title of the Person You Would Be Reporting to]
  • Dear [Company Name] Recruiter
  • Dear [Position Title] Recruiting Manager
  • To the [Department Name of the Position You Are Applying for]
  • Dear Hiring Manager or Interviewer
  • Dear Hiring Manager of Company X
  • Dear Person in Charge of Hiring

Tips to Find the Names of Employers and Hiring Managers

A cover letter may seem like a small part of the hiring process, but it has an enormous impact on whether or not your resume will even be opened by the company you’re applying to.

One way to ensure your cover letter isn’t ignored is by addressing it properly, which can be difficult if you don’t know to whom you’re writing it!

To help you figure out the name of the cover letter’s recipient , here are some tips:

Tip #1: Check the company’s website.

If you know the company’s name and they have a website with contact information, that’s usually the best place to start.

Tip #2: Review job listing sites.

If you’re applying through an online job application site like Indeed, then there will be an option to check to whom the cover letter will be sent. The job posting usually provides you with the names of employers or hiring managers.

Tip #3: Use LinkedIn.

The easiest way to find out the name of the Hiring Manager is to check LinkedIn. The job posting usually includes information about the Hiring Manager. Visit the profile, where it’ll list their current position as well as past positions on their profile page.

Tip #4: Check the job description.

Check the job description to find the name of potential hiring managers. Sometimes, it’s just there. All you need to do is read through the job posting.

Tip #5: Search social media.

You can probably find the names of recruiters on social media. See Facebook or Twitter for any information you can use in writing the cover letter.

How to Make the Perfect Cover Letter

When sending your cover letter without the name, you must be sure that you are addressing the person who is in charge of hiring. Avoid using To Whom It May Concern at all costs. If it is unavoidable, aim to get personal as soon as possible. If you’re emailing a large company, mention specific people you have spoken with over email or via social media in your letter.

To make the perfect cover letter , use an online cover letter maker. This is the best and easiest way to address your cover letter without knowing the name of the company.

The cover letter maker will have all of your information and personalize it for you. Plus, it will give tips on what to include in your cover letter. An online cover letter maker will walk you through each step and ensure that your cover letter looks professional.

You can also get help from other people who are reviewing cover letters if you need more advice on how to approach this. They will know everything about how these companies operate and be able to provide insight into what might work for them.

Final Thoughts

Writing a cover letter can seem like one of the most time-consuming and overwhelming parts of your job search, especially when you don’t know who the person you’re writing to is. However, cover letters are necessary.

If you don’t know the name of the person you’re writing to, that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and not write one at all, though. These five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name will ensure that your application still gets noticed.

10 thoughts on “ How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations ”

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Click here to directly go to the complete cover letter without name sample

How to address a cover letter without a name?

According to a study, every corporate job opening gets roughly 250 resumes , out of which only 3-4 applicants land an interview.

That means if your cover letter feels generic and lacks personal touch, it may end up in the trash.

However, what if there is a circumstance for addressing a cover letter with no name?

Read on to get an insight into the following FAQs:

  • How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the hiring manager?
  • How to format the cover letter address correctly?
  • Who to write a cover letter to without a contact?
  • Which method of delivering a cover letter is not appropriate?
  • What are the practical ways to find the hiring manager’s name?
  • Additional tips to write a cover letter without name

Whom to Address a Cover Letter To?

Who do you address a cover letter to when there is no name?

To understand how to address a cover letter, you need to know to whom to address it.

A cover letter should be addressed in the following ways:

  • If the hiring manager’s name is given in the job description, you should always address the cover letter to them.
  • If the hiring manager’s email address is not there in the job description, you can address the cover letter to the department manager.

There is no point in sending the cover letter to the CEO or founders because they are not the ones who usually handle the recruitment process.

Also Read: How to address a cover letter?

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name?

A cover letter for a job is not similar to a letter to a friend.

The purpose of a cover is to impress the hiring manager with your professional expertise to score an interview.

But addressing cover letters with no name may get rejected by the recruiters.

We understand how important it is to know how to write a cover letter without a name as per these statistics.

Also Read: How to write a cover letter?

Here are some steps on how to address a cover letter without a name:

1. Address the Cover Letter with “Dear Hiring Manager”

It is the most common way to address a hiring manager with no name and hiring managers prefer this salutation over no salutation at all.

This salutation allows the hiring manager to quickly focus on the main body of the cover letter, instead of rejecting the cover letter right away.

However, the best way to address a cover letter is by personalizing it.

2. Address the Cover Letter to the Team

When in doubt, you can address the whole team so that anyone from the team can receive your cover letter and respond accordingly.

It can be the hiring manager, assistant, or anyone from the department who may interview you during the job application process.

You can phrase it as:

  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Project Manager Hiring Team
Also Read: What can a cover letter explain that a résumé cannot?

3. Maintain Professional Approach

Maintain a professional approach and avoid informal phrases or words such as "Hello!", "Good Evening/Morning", or "Hi!"

Keep it simple and professional by using the term, "Dear" followed by the designation.

For Example:

  • Dear Hiring Head
  • Dear Recruitment Supervisor

4. Do Not Assume Gender or Marital Status

You often know the hiring manager’s name but do not know their gender or marital status.

Assuming someone's gender may seem disrespectful and unprofessional hence you should avoid making such mistakes by keeping it gender-neutral. Avoid the term "Sir" or "Madam" and simply address the recipient as "Dear (Profile)".

The best way to find the hiring manager’s gender is by doing a quick LinkedIn search.

The LinkedIn profile may contain a profile picture wherein you can determine the hiring manager’s gender.

If the hiring manager’s gender is Male, address the hiring manager with “Mr.”.

  • “Mr. Xavier,”

If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing.

As you don’t know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic “Ms..”

  • Dear Ms. Moore
  • Dear Ms. Kyle
  • Dear Mrs. Lane
  • Dear Miss Maximoff
Also Read: How to reach out to recruiters on LinkedIn?

5. Include Job Profile and Professional Titles

Are you asking yourself continuously, “How to address a cover letter without a contact name?”

Here is the answer for you.

Instead of using only “ Dear Hiring Manager ,” include the department name or the title of the person who will be reading the cover letter to make it more specific.

  • Dear Marketing Department,
  • Dear Head of the Sales Department,
  • Dear VP of Marketing

By personalizing the addresses in this way, you can grab the hiring manager’s attention to read your resume.

This shows that you are not throwing a rock blindly. You have done your research and have some idea about the company.

Don’t forget to include the hiring manager’s academic title or professional title in the cover letter address.

These types of hyper-personalization can grab the hiring manager’s attention even more and entice them to read your cover letter.

How to Write the Academic Title in the Cover Letter Address?

You can write the academic title in full form.

  • Dear Doctor Green,
  • Dear Professor Geller,

Alternatively, you can use the abbreviation of the titles as well.

  • Dear Dr. Murphy,
  • Dear Prof. Goodwin,
  • Dear Sgt. Moore,
  • Dear Principle Alan,

Where to Place the Cover Letter Address?

Not just the proper format, but the placement of the cover letter address also plays an important role.

  • The cover letter heading will go at the top.
  • Write the date below the heading.
  • Leave one line space and write the hiring manager’s name.
  • Write the address of the company.
  • Leave one space and then write the position you are applying for.
  • Leave one space and then write the salutation.

Cover letter without name

Best Way to Address a Cover Letter with No Name or Email

Writing an email cover letter address is fundamentally similar but with some tweaks.

If you are sending a digital cover letter, you need to start with a professional subject line.

John Doe: Application for Video Editor Position, Reff: Anthony Moore

Then add your cover letter salutation based on the same rule.

Add a line space and then start your cover letter by adding the necessary information that gives an insight into your professional experience and skills.

Subject Line: John Doe: Application for Project Manager Position, Reff: Charles Moore

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am a 5+ years experienced project management professional…

Appropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear (department name) Hiring Committee
  • Dear Hiring Team
  • To the (department name) Hiring Manager
  • Dear Team (For smaller companies)
  • To the Recruiting Team
Also Read: What are the benefits of using a cover letter builder?

Inappropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Sir or Madam — Ancient salutation does not work anymore
  • To Whom It May Concern — It is not personalized
  • Hello, Hi, or Greetings — Informal salutation
  • Happy Sunday! — Casual salutation
  • Good Morning — Not practical as you have no idea when they will read the letter
Also Read: How to draft a professional message to the hiring manager?

How to Find the Hiring Manager's Name?

How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the name?

Well, you can simply address your cover letter as, "Dear Hiring Manager". But if you feel the need to add the name of the hiring manager then there are ways to do so.

Finding the hiring manager’s name is the best way to address a cover letter.

So, before calling it quits, let us look at some ways to find the hiring manager’s name.

Read the Job Description Thoroughly

Always read the job description carefully!

Usually, the hiring manager’s name or the title of the reporting manager is given in the job description or under the job description.

For instance, “ The digital marketer will report to the Marketing Manager. ”

You can use the title to then find their name on the company website or LinkedIn.

Sometimes the job description includes the hiring manager’s email address.

For Example: “ Send your cover letter and resume to johndoe@hiration[dot]com" .

You can find the hiring manager’s name in the email address.

Visit the Profile of the Job Publisher

Sites like LinkedIn or AngelList have this unique feature to show you the name of the one who posts the job.

You can go to their profile to see if they are the hiring manager and include their name in the cover letter.

Call the Company Front Desk

Calling the company is the easiest way to find the hiring manager's name. But, job candidates reserve it as the last option.

  • Call the company desk
  • Tell them that you are applying for a “vacant position” in their company and would like to know the hiring manager’s name.

Here’s an example of the script:

“ Hi, my name is Alex, and I’m currently applying for the video editor position in your company. Would it be possible for you to provide me the name and email id of the hiring manager so that I can address the cover letter properly?”

Do a Quick LinkedIn Search

According to a study, 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn regularly . That means, if you search for the hiring manager of a certain company on LinkedIn, there is a high chance for you to find their name.

Many job descriptions specifically tell the reporting manager’s title in the job description. Then you need to address the cover letter to the reporting manager.

The process of finding the reporting manager’s name is similar.

  • Go to LinkedIn
  • Search the job title and company name
  • In the search result, you can find the profile of the designated person
  • Sometimes, there might be more than one similar position for a big company so you need to narrow your search by location to find the reporting manager
Also Read : How to Make the Best Use of LinkedIn Search Feature?

Network with People

LinkedIn is the best way to find and connect with people who have connections in the company you are applying for. If you can create a good rapport with these professionals, you can ask for a reference.

It is an easy but time-consuming process.

  • Search the company name and see the professionals active on LinkedIn
  • Start engaging with their content and leave thoughtful comments
  • Send them a personalized connection invite after engaging with their content for a couple of days
  • Do not ask for a reference abruptly; instead, start building a rapport with them by sharing helpful industry information, blog, article links, videos, etc.
  • If possible, move the connection offline and meet in person
  • After you develop a good rapport with the professionals, you can ask for a reference or introduce yourself to the hiring manager
Also Read : How to Connect with People on LinkedIn?

Tips for Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Always use a formal address in the cover letter.

Whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not, always keep the address formal in the cover letter. Even if the company has an informal culture, do not use any casual address unless you are a part of the organization.

  • Dear Ms. Lane,
  • Dear Prof. Luther,
  • Dear Ms. Ann,
  • Hello Maya,
  • Greetings Max,

Avoid Using “To Whom It May Concern”

This salutation is too generic and does not address anyone at all; however, according to a survey, 17% of hiring managers prefer this salutation over others .

But the problem is 83% of hiring managers don’t prefer it.

So we suggest that you avoid it altogether.

Avoid Addressing the Cover Letter to the Recruiters

A recruiter’s job is to sort the resumes based on skills and experience and pass them to the hiring managers. They don’t generally read the cover letter.

So, it’s a waste of opportunity if you address the cover letter to the recruiter.

Instead, always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Ensure That You Are Addressing the Cover Letter to the Right Person

Online information is not updated regularly. Often, the concerned persons leave the job, but their email id is still there on the website.

So, who to address cover letter to if unknown? Or you are unsure? It is best to acresully research the hiring manager’s name and crosscheck if you have any doubts by calling the company directly.

Do Not Mess up the Hiring Manager’s Name

There is a saying that “The first impression is the last impression.”

Try to make an excellent first impression by writing the hiring manager’s name using the correct spelling.

Don’t Stress Too Much

If you have the relevant skills and experience for a job, addressing a cover letter to the wrong person might not be a big deal. So, if you can’t find the hiring manager’s name and wondering how to address a cover letter without a name, just write “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Make Sure the Cover Letter is Short and Easy to Read

You should not make the cover letter more than 400-500 words long. It will make it difficult to read.

A short and crisp cover letter will intrigue the hiring managers as compared to a long one.

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

Cover Letter Without Name Sample

Hiration cover letter builder.

Create a polished, professional cover letter in minutes with an AI-powered tool that helps you create a personalized cover letter based on the job description.

It comes with the following features:

  • Option to save unlimited cover letters
  • Intuitive next text suggestion
  • 15+ cover letter designs
  • Full rich-text editor
  • Unlimited PDF downloads
  • 30+ pre-filled cover letter templates
  • 1-click design change
  • A sharable link
  • LIVE cover letter editor

FAQs on "How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name?"

With that, we have answered all of your questions on “how to address a cover letter without a name?”.

Addressing a cover letter to an unknown person should not be difficult if you can keep some points in mind regrading how to go about in this situation. Here are a few FAQs that will help you gain a quick recap:

Q. How to address a cover letter to an unknown person?

A. In cases where you are wondering how to address a cover letter without name, you can opt for "Dear Hiring Manager," or "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team,".

Q. Who to address cover letter to with no contact?

A. When addressing a cover letter without a specific contact, it's best to use a generic but professional greeting such as "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team" or "Dear Hiring Team." This shows that you have taken the time to tailor your application to the company while acknowledging that you don't have a specific contact person.

Hiration provides you with a personalized 360-degree ChatGPT-powered career service platform for all your professional needs - from building a shortlist-worthy resume and cover letter to optimizing your LinkedIn profile, preparing for interviews, and more!

For any queries or concerns, feel free to drop a mail at support{@}hiration.com

cover letter no person to address

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How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name? Use These 5 Salutations

  • Klara Cervenanska , 
  • Updated February 23, 2024 6 min read

Struggling with how to address a cover letter without a name ? It's a common challenge that can make even the most confident job seekers pause.

Ideally, you want to personalize your cover letter salutation to show you've done your homework.

But what do you do when that information isn't readily available?

If this sounds familiar, you’re in the right place. Whether the job ad skipped the contact details or your online searches came up empty, we've got your back.

This article will show you:

  • 5 different ways how to address a cover letter without a name

How NOT to address a cover letter without a name

  • Strategies to find the hiring manager's name 
  • Cover letter examples 

Table of Contents

Click on a section to skip

  • How to find the hiring manager's name?

How to address a cover letter without a name? Use these 5 salutations

Tips for addressing a cover letter with no name, where to place the cover letter address, key takeaways: how to address a cover letter without a name, how to find the hiring manager's name.

It's not a deal-breaker to address your cover letter without a specific name. 

However, addressing it to a specific person and including a name can add a personal touch that sets your application apart.  

If you've hit a wall in your search for a name, don't give up just yet. 

Try these five strategies to uncover the name of the hiring manager:

  • Check the job posting again. Sometimes the answer is hidden in plain sight. The bottom of the job listing might include instructions like "Email your resume to [email protected]," which not only gives you the hiring manager's email but also their name. 
  • Use LinkedIn. Search the company's page and browse through employee profiles. Look for individuals with titles that might indicate they're in charge of hiring, such as "Talent Acquisition Manager" or heads of the department you're applying to. 
  • Search the company website. Most organizations have an 'About Us' or 'Team' page where they list their staff members and their roles. Here, you can often find clues about who might be the hiring manager or at least get the names of potential contacts in the right department.
  • Try networking. Reach out to your existing network to see if anyone has connections within the company. Sometimes, a mutual contact can provide you with the name you need.
  • Call the company. It might seem a bit old-fashioned, but it's a direct approach that can yield results. A polite phone call inquiring about who is managing the hiring for the position you're interested in can sometimes get you the information you need. 

Starting your cover letter with the hiring manager's name is the best way to go. It shows you've looked into the company and are serious about the job.

But, if you've tried and still can't find a name, don't worry. 

Here are some ways to address your cover letter when you don't know who will read it:

  • Dear Hiring Manager. This straightforward approach is professional and widely accepted. It shows respect for the person reviewing your application.
  • Dear [Department] Team. Mentioning the department, like "Dear Marketing Team," shows you know where you want to be and who you're talking to.
  • Dear Recruiter. Use this if you're applying through a recruiter or if the job ad was posted by HR. It shows you understand the process.
  • Dear Director of [Department]. If you know the department but not the name, this shows you've thought about where you fit in the company.
  • Dear Talent Acquisition Team. Perfect for when your application will be reviewed by several people. It shows you understand the process.

These ways help you start your cover letter professionally, even when you can’t find a specific name. They show respect and that you're thoughtful about your application.

When crafting your cover letter, it's just as important to know how NOT to address it. 

Steering clear of certain greetings can help maintain the professional tone of your application. 

Here are some salutations to avoid :

  • To Whom It May Concern. This is overly impersonal and outdated.
  • Dear Sir/Madam. This comes across as old-fashioned and can be seen as gender presumptive.
  • Hey There. Far too casual for a professional document.
  • Hello. While friendly, it lacks the formality a cover letter requires.
  • Hi [Company Name]. This is too informal and doesn't address any individual or specific role.

Crafting a cover letter without a specific recipient's name doesn't mean you can skimp on professionalism. 

Here's how to ensure your cover letter makes a great impression, even when you're not sure who will read it:

  • Stick to formal greetings. Use "Dear Hiring Manager" to start off on the right foot. It’s respectful and works every time. Yes, even if the company culture is really laid back.
  • Avoid addressing recruiters. Directly addressing recruiters is generally not advised, unless you have been in contact with one specifically for this role. In such cases, using their name can add a personal touch.
  • Target the right department/person. Make every effort to verify you're targeting the right person or department within the company. Otherwise, it can redirect your application to the wrong hands.
  • Spell-check the name. Found a name? Double-check the spelling. Getting it wrong can look bad.
  • How to Write a Cover Letter with No Experience
  • 7 Great Cover Letter Openings
  • 8 Great Cover Letter Endings
  • The Only Cover Letter Guide You’ll Need in 2024

And what about a resume?

Create a beautiful resume in seconds with the help of AI and our customizable templates.

When setting up your cover letter, start with your name centered at the top. It looks neat and professional. Right below your name, put the company’s address on the left side and your address on the right. This way, both addresses are easy to spot.

Next, add the date below your address. It shows when you sent the letter.

Right under the date, write your greeting, like “Dear Hiring Manager.” This is where your actual letter begins.

We’ve got a sample below to show you how it should look. It’s made with Kickresume's cover letter builder . This tool is great because it gives you a template that’s easy to fill out. It makes sure your cover letter looks good without much effort.

Cover Letter Structure Example

This cover letter sample was provided by a real person who got hired with Kickresume’s help.

In wrapping up, let’s quickly recap the 5 best salutations to use for addressing your cover letter when the name is unknown:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear Recruiter
  • Dear Director of [Department]
  • Dear Talent Acquisition Team

But remember, the strength of your cover letter lies in its content .

A well-crafted letter that speaks directly to the job description and showcases your skills can make a significant difference. Personalizing your cover letter as much as possible helps you stand out from the crowd.

For those struggling with writer's block, Kickresume's AI resume builder is an invaluable tool. It can help you write the first draft of your cover letter based on your job title and job description , making personalization easier and more effective.

Klara graduated from the University of St Andrews in Scotland. After having written resumes for many of her fellow students, she began writing full-time for Kickresume. Klara is our go-to person for all things related to student or 'no experience resumes'. At the same time, she has written some of the most popular resume advice articles on this blog. Her pieces were featured in multiple CNBC articles. When she's not writing, you'll probably find her chasing dogs or people-watching while sipping on a cup of coffee.

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How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

Background Image

After weeks of heavy job searching, you’re almost there!

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send in your application and call it a day, you remember that you need to write a cover letter too.

So now, you’re stuck staring at a blank page, wondering where to start...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think. 

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve.

We're going to cover:

What Is a Cover Letter?

  • How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter, Step by Step
  • 15+ Job-Winning Cover Letter Examples

Let’s get started.

A cover letter is a document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume or CV.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, it should be around 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter is supposed to impress the hiring manager and convince them you’re worth interviewing as a candidate.

So, how can your cover letter achieve this?

First of all, it should complement your resume, not copy it. Your cover letter is your chance to elaborate on important achievements, skills, or anything else that your resume doesn’t give you the space to cover. 

For example, if you have an employment gap on your resume, the cover letter is a great place to explain why it happened and how it helped you grow as a person. 

If this is your first time writing a cover letter, writing about yourself might seem complicated. But don’t worry—you don’t need to be super creative or even a good writer .

All you have to do is follow this tried and tested cover letter structure:

structure of a cover letter

  • Header. Add all the necessary contact information at the top of your cover letter.
  • Formal greeting. Choose an appropriate way to greet your target audience.
  • Introduction. Introduce yourself in the opening paragraph and explain your interest in the role.
  • Body. Elaborate on why you’re the best candidate for the job and a good match for the company. Focus on “selling” your skills, achievements, and relevant professional experiences.
  • Conclusion. Summarize your key points and wrap it up professionally.

Now, let’s take a look at an example of a cover letter that follows our structure perfectly:

How to Write a Cover Letter

New to cover letter writing? Give our cover letter video a watch before diving into the article!

When Should You Write a Cover Letter?

You should always include a cover letter in your job application, even if the hiring manager never reads it. Submitting a cover letter is as important as submitting a resume if you want to look like a serious candidate.

If the employer requests a cover letter as part of the screening process, not sending one is a huge red flag and will probably get your application tossed into the “no” pile immediately.

On the other hand, if the job advertisement doesn’t require a cover letter from the candidates, adding one shows you went the extra mile.

Putting in the effort to write a cover letter can set you apart from other candidates with similar professional experience and skills, and it could even sway the hiring manager to call you for an interview if you do it right.

Need to write a letter to help get you into a good school or volunteer program? Check out our guide to learn how to write a motivation letter !

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

Now that you know what a cover letter is, it’s time to learn how to write one!

We’ll go through the process in detail, step by step.

#1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, stylish template?

cover letter templates for 2024

Just choose one of our hand-picked cover letter templates , and you’ll be all set in no time!

As a bonus, our intuitive AI will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter as you write it. You’ll have the perfect cover letter done in minutes!

cover letter templates

#2. Put Contact Information in the Header

As with a resume, it’s important to start your cover letter with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter’s header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text.

Contact Information on Cover Letter

Here, you want to include all the essential contact information , including:

  • Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top.
  • Job Title. Match the professional title underneath your name to the exact job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Email Address. Always use a professional and easy-to-spell email address. Ideally, it should combine your first and last names.
  • Phone Number. Add a number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country, no need for more details.
  • Relevant Links (optional). You can add links to websites or social media profiles that are relevant to your field. Examples include a LinkedIn profile , Github, or an online portfolio.

Then it’s time to add the recipient’s contact details, such as:

  • Hiring Manager's Name. If you can find the name of the hiring manager, add it.
  • Hiring Manager's Title. While there’s no harm in writing “hiring manager,” if they’re the head of the department, we recommend you use that title accordingly.
  • Company Name. Make sure to write the name of the company you're applying to.
  • Location. The city and state/country are usually enough information here, too.
  • Date of Writing (Optional). You can include the date you wrote your cover letter for an extra professional touch.

matching resume and cover letter

#3. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed all the contact information, it’s time to start writing the content of the cover letter.

The first thing you need to do here is to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager.

In fact, you want to address the hiring manager personally .

Forget the old “Dear Sir or Madam” or the impersonal “To Whom It May Concern.” You want to give your future boss a good impression and show them that you did your research before sending in your application.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes something sticks with their generic approach

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager?

First, check the job ad. The hiring manager’s name might be listed somewhere in it.

If that doesn’t work, check the company’s LinkedIn page. You just need to look up the head of the relevant department you’re applying to, and you’re all set.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer.

Here’s what you should look for on LinkedIn:

linkedin search cco

And there you go! You have your hiring manager.

But let’s say you’re applying for a position as a server . In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager” or “food and beverage manager.”

If the results don’t come up with anything, try checking out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Make sure to address them as Mr. or Ms., followed by their last name. If you’re not sure about their gender or marital status, you can just stick to their full name, like so:

  • Dear Mr. Kurtuy,
  • Dear Andrei Kurtuy,

But what if you still can’t find the hiring manager’s name, no matter where you look?

No worries. You can direct your cover letter to the company, department, or team as a whole, or just skip the hiring manager’s name.

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear [Company Name]

Are you applying for a research position? Learn how to write an academic personal statement .

#4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Hiring managers get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The biggest problem with most opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Here’s an example:

  • My name is Jonathan, and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a Sales Manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

And do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start with some of your top achievements to grab the reader’s attention. And to get the point across, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

Your opening paragraph should also show the hiring manager a bit about why you want this specific job. For example, mention how the job relates to your plans for the future or how it can help you grow professionally. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not just applying left and right—you’re actually enthusiastic about getting this particular role.

Now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Dear Mr. Smith,

My name’s Michael, and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked as a Sales Representative with Company X, another fin-tech company , for 3+ years, where I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month and beat the KPIs by around 40%. I believe that my previous industry experience, passion for finance , and excellence in sales make me the right candidate for the job.

The second candidate starts with what they can do for the company in the future and immediately lists an impressive and relevant achievement. Since they’re experienced in the same industry and interested in finance, the hiring manager can see they’re not just a random applicant.

From this introduction, it’s safe to say that the hiring manager would read the rest of this candidate’s cover letter.

#5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details

The next part of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what sets you apart as a qualified candidate for the job.

The main thing you need to remember here is that you shouldn’t make it all about yourself . Your cover letter is supposed to show the hiring manager how you relate to the job and the company you’re applying to.

No matter how cool you make yourself sound in your cover letter, if you don’t tailor it to match what the hiring manager is looking for, you’re not getting an interview.

To get this right, use the job ad as a reference when writing your cover letter. Make sure to highlight skills and achievements that match the job requirements, and you’re good to go.

Since this part of your cover letter is by far the longest, you should split it into at least two paragraphs.

Here’s what each paragraph should cover:

Explain Why You’re the Perfect Candidate for the Role

Before you can show the hiring manager that you’re exactly what they’ve been looking for, you need to know what it is they’re looking for.

Start by doing a bit of research. Learn what the most important skills and responsibilities of the role are according to the job ad, and focus on any relevant experience you have that matches them.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. The top requirements on the job ad are:

  • Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of $10,000+ / month
  • Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  • Excellent copywriting skills

So, in the body of your cover letter, you need to show how you meet these requirements. Here’s an example of what that can look like:

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $40,000+ . As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. I created the ad copy and images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

Our example addresses all the necessary requirements and shows off the candidate’s relevant skills.

Are you a student applying for your first internship? Learn how to write an internship cover letter with our dedicated guide.

Explain Why You’re a Good Fit for the Company

As skilled and experienced as you may be, that’s not all the hiring manager is looking for.

They also want someone who’s a good fit for their company and who actually wants to work there.

Employees who don’t fit in with the company culture are likely to quit sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary , so hiring managers vet candidates very carefully to avoid this scenario.

So, you have to convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about working with them.

Start by doing some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company’s product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the company’s culture like?

Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or on job-search websites like Jobscan or Glassdoor.

Then, pick your favorite thing about the company and talk about it in your cover letter.

But don’t just describe the company in its own words just to flatter them. Be super specific—the hiring manager can see through any fluff.

For example, if you’re passionate about their product and you like the company’s culture of innovation and independent work model, you can write something like:

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features, such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2, were real game changers for the device.

I really admire how Company XYZ strives for excellence in all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone who thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I’ll be a great match for your Product Design team.

So, make sure to do your fair share of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying to that specific company.

Is the company you want to work for not hiring at the moment? Check out our guide to writing a letter of interest .

#6. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Finally, it’s time to conclude your cover letter.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't make in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? If there’s any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision, mention it here. If not, just recap your key selling points so far, such as key skills and expertise.
  • Express gratitude. Politely thanking the hiring manager for their time is always a good idea.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. This means you should ask the hiring manager to do something, like call you and discuss your application or arrange an interview.
  • Remember to sign your cover letter. Just add a formal closing line and sign your name at the bottom.

Here’s an example of how to end your cover letter :

I hope to help Company X make the most of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your Facebook marketing goals. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided email address or phone number so that we may arrange an interview.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alice Richards

Feel free to use one of these other popular closing lines for your cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Once you’re done with your cover letter, it’s time to check if it meets all industry requirements. 

Give our handy cover letter writing checklist a look to make sure:

Does your cover letter heading include all essential information?

  • Professional Email
  • Phone Number
  • Relevant Links

Do you address the right person? 

  • The hiring manager in the company
  • Your future direct supervisor
  • The company/department in general

Does your introductory paragraph grab the reader's attention?

  • Did you mention some of your top achievements?
  • Did you use numbers and facts to back up your experience?
  • Did you convey enthusiasm for the specific role?

Do you show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

  • Did you identify the core requirements for the role?
  • Did you show how your experiences helped you fit the requirements perfectly?

Do you convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the company you’re applying to?

  • Did you identify the top 3 things that you like about the company?
  • Did you avoid generic reasons for explaining your interest in the company?

Did you conclude your cover letter properly?

  • Did you recap your key selling points in the conclusion?
  • Did you end your cover letter with a call to action?
  • Did you use the right formal closing line and sign your name?

15 Cover Letter Tips

Now you’re all set to write your cover letter! 

Before you start typing, here are some cover letter tips to help take your cover letter to the next level:

  • Customize Your Cover Letter for Each Job. Make sure your cover letter is tailored to the job you're applying for. This shows you're not just sending generic applications left and right, and it tells the hiring manager you’re the right person for the job.
  • Showcase Your Skills. Talk about how your skills meet the company’s needs. And while your hard skills should be front and center, you shouldn’t underestimate your soft skills in your cover letter either.
  • Avoid Fluff. Don’t make any generic statements you can’t back up. The hiring manager can tell when you’re just throwing words around, and it doesn’t make your cover letter look good.
  • Use Specific Examples. Instead of saying you're great at something, give an actual example to back up your claim. Any data you can provide makes you sound more credible, so quantify your achievements. For example, give numbers such as percentages related to your performance and the timeframe it took to accomplish certain achievements.
  • Research the Company. Always take time to learn about the company you're applying to. Make sure to mention something about them in your cover letter to show the hiring manager that you're interested.
  • Follow the Application Instructions. If the job posting asks for something specific in your cover letter or requires a certain format, make sure you include it. Not following instructions can come off as unattentive or signal to the hiring manager that you’re not taking the job seriously.
  • Use the Right Template and Format. Choose the right cover letter format and adapt your cover letter’s look to the industry you’re applying for. For example, if you’re aiming for a job in Law or Finance, you should go for a cleaner, more professional look. But if you’re applying for a field that values innovation, like IT or Design, you have more room for creativity.
  • Express Your Enthusiasm. Let the hiring manager know why you're excited about the job. Your passion for the specific role or the field in general can be a big selling point, and show them that you’re genuinely interested, not just applying left and right.
  • Address Any Gaps. If there are any employment gaps in your resume , your cover letter is a great place to mention why. Your resume doesn’t give you enough space to elaborate on an employment gap, so addressing it here can set hiring managers at ease—life happens, and employers understand.
  • Avoid Quirky Emails. Your email address should be presentable. It’s hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is “[email protected].” Just use a [email protected] format.
  • Check Your Contact Information. Typos in your email address or phone number can mean a missed opportunity. Double-check these before sending your application.
  • Mention if You Want to Relocate. If you’re looking for a job that lets you move somewhere else, specify this in your cover letter.
  • Keep It Brief. You want to keep your cover letter short and sweet. Hiring managers don’t have time to read a novel, so if you go over one page, they simply won’t read it at all.
  • Use a Professional Tone. Even though a conversational tone isn’t a bad thing, remember that it's still a formal document. Show professionalism in your cover letter by keeping slang, jargon, and emojis out of it.
  • Proofread Carefully. Typos and grammar mistakes are a huge deal-breaker. Use a tool like Grammarly or QuillBot to double-check your spelling and grammar, or even get a friend to check it for you.

15+ Cover Letter Examples

Need some inspiration? Check out some perfect cover letter examples for different experience levels and various professions.

5+ Cover Letter Examples by Experience

#1. college student cover letter example.

college or student cover letter example

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#2. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Middle Management Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a project manager cover letter here.

#3. Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#4. Career Change Cover Letter Example

Career Change Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to a career change resume and cover letter here.

#5. Management Cover Letter Example

Management Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a management cover letter here.

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an executive resume here.

9+ Cover Letter Examples by Profession

#1. it cover letter example.

IT Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

#2. Consultant Cover Letter Example

Consultant Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#3. Human Resources Cover Letter

Human Resources Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a human resources cover letter here.

#4. Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business cover letter here.

#5. Sales Cover Letter Example

Sales Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales cover letter here.

#6. Social Worker Cover Letter

Social Worker Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a social worker cover letter here.

#7. Lawyer Cover Letter

Lawyer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a lawyer cover letter here.

#8. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an administrative assistant cover letter here.

#9. Engineering Cover Letter Example

Engineering Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineer cover letter here.

#10. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist cover letter here.

Need more inspiration? Check out these cover letter examples to learn what makes them stand out.

Plug & Play Cover Letter Template

Not sure how to start your cover letter? Don’t worry!

Just copy and paste our free cover letter template into the cover letter builder, and swap out the blanks for your details.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Profession]

[Your Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

[Your Location]

[Your LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

[Your Personal Website URL (optional)]

[Recipient's Name, e.g., Jane Doe],

[Recipient's Position, e.g., Hiring Manager]

[Company Name, e.g., ABC Corporation]

[Company Address]

[City, State/Country]

Dear [Recipient's Name],

As a seasoned [Your Profession] with [Number of Years of Experience] years of industry experience, I am eager to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my experience in [Your Industry/Sector] and the successes I've achieved throughout my education and career, I believe I can bring unique value and creativity to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I've taken the lead on more than [Number of Projects/Assignments] projects, some valued up to $[Highest Project Value]. I pride myself on consistently exceeding client expectations and have successfully [Mention a Key Achievement] in just a [Amount of Time] through [Skill] and [Skill].

I've collaborated with various professionals, such as [List Roles], ensuring that all [projects/tasks] meet [relevant standards or objectives]. This hands-on experience, coupled with my dedication to understanding each [client's/customer's] vision, has equipped me to navigate and deliver on complex projects.

My key strengths include:

  • Improving [Achievement] by [%] over [Amount of Time] which resulted in [Quantified Result].
  • Optimizing [Work Process/Responsibility] which saved [Previous Employer] [Amount of Time/Budget/Other Metric] over [Weeks/Months/Years]
  • Spearheading team of [Number of People] to [Task] and achieving [Quantified Result].

Alongside this letter, I've attached my resume. My educational background, a [Your Degree] with a concentration in [Your Specialization], complements the practical skills that I'm particularly eager to share with [Company Name].

I'm excited about the possibility of contributing to [Something Notable About the Company or Its Mission]. I'd be grateful for the chance to delve deeper into how my expertise aligns with your needs.

Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

The Heart of Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application falls through.

After all, your cover letter is meant to complement your resume. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression in your cover letter, only for the hiring manager to never read it because your resume was mediocre.

But don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here, too.

Check out our dedicated guide on how to make a resume and learn everything you need to know to land your dream job!

Just pick one of our resume templates and start writing your own job-winning resume.

resume examples for cover letters

Key Takeaways

Now that we’ve walked you through all the steps of writing a cover letter, let’s summarize everything we’ve learned:

  • A cover letter is a 250 - 400 word document that’s meant to convince the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job.
  • Your job application should always include a cover letter alongside your resume.
  • To grab the hiring manager’s attention, write a strong opening paragraph. Mention who you are, why you’re applying, and a standout achievement to pique their interest.
  • Your cover letter should focus on why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you’re passionate about working in this specific company.
  • Use the body of your cover letter to provide details on your skills, achievements, and qualifications, as well as make sure to convey your enthusiasm throughout your whole cover letter.
  • Recap your key selling points towards the end of your cover letter, and end it with a formal closing line and your full name signed underneath.

At Novorésumé, we’re committed to helping you get the job you deserve every step of the way! 

Follow our career blog for more valuable advice, or check out some of our top guides, such as:

  • How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide
  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers [Full List]

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cover letter no person to address

How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

  • ‘I Had a Great Job Interview — Why Haven’t I Heard Back?’
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Find out how to send mail. 1:53

Video Description: How to Send a Letter or Postcard (TXT 4 KB)

How to Send a Letter or Postcard: Domestic

Sending mail with USPS is easy! Our video will help you with most letters, cards, and postcards you send domestically (inside the U.S.), including U.S. territories and military bases in the U.S. and abroad.

For how to ship a package, see How to Send a Package: Domestic .

Send Mail: Step-by-Step Instructions

Envelope and postcard

Step 1: Choose Envelope or Postcard

Envelopes are for sending flat, flexible things, like letters, cards, checks, forms, and other paper goods. For just 1 $0.68 First-Class Mail ® Forever ® stamp , you can send 1 oz (about 4 sheets of regular, 8-1/2" x 11" paper in a rectangular envelope) to anywhere in the U.S.!

No. 10 envelope compared to the minimum and maximum envelope sizes

Envelopes must be rectangular and made of paper to qualify for letter prices. Your envelope can be a maximum of 11-1/2" long x 6-1/8" high. (A standard No. 10 envelope is 9-1/2" long x 4-1/8" high.) You can fold what you put in your envelope, but it needs to stay flat—no more than 1/4" thick.

If you want to send letter-sized papers without folding them, you can use a large envelope (called a "flat"); the postage for flats starts at $1.39 . If your large envelope is nonrectangular, rigid (can't bend), or lumpy (not uniformly thick), you'll have to pay the package price.

TIP: If your envelope can't fit through USPS mail processing machines, or is rigid, lumpy or has clasps, string, or buttons, it's "nonmachinable" and you'll have to pay $0.44 more to send it. ( See additional postage in Step 3 .) You'll also have to pay more if your envelopes are square or vertical (taller than they are wide).

Postcards are for short messages that you don't need to put in an envelope. Save money using a $0.53 postcard stamp to send a standard-sized postcard anywhere in the U.S. Standard postcards are usually made of paper, are between 5" to 6" long and 3-1/2" to 4-1/4" high, and are between 0.007" and 0.016" thick.

Envelope and postcard with return address written in the top left corner and delivery address in the bottom center.

Step 2: Address Your Mail

Envelopes: Write your address (the "return" or "sender" address) in the top left corner. Write the delivery address (the "recipient" address) in the bottom center.

Postcards: Postcards come in different formats, so write the delivery address in the space it gives you (on the same side you write your message and put the stamp).

Print your return address and the delivery address clearly, in the correct spots, to make sure your mail is delivered on time.

Address Format Tips

  • Use a pen or permanent marker.
  • Do not use commas or periods.
  • Include the ZIP+4 ® Code whenever possible.

Write Sender Address

Write your address (the "return address") in the top-left corner. Include the following on separate lines:

  • Your full name or company name
  • Apartment or suite number
  • Full street address
  • City, State, and ZIP+4 Code

Write Delivery Address

Write the delivery address (the "recipient" address) in the bottom center of the envelope. Include the following on separate lines:

  • Recipient's full name or company name

If the apartment or suite number cannot fit on the delivery address line above the city, state, and ZIP+4 Code, place it on a separate line immediately above the delivery address line.

Write the sender's address in the top-left corner. Include the following on separate lines:

  • Full street address and apartment or suite number, if applicable

Special U.S. Addresses

Puerto rico.

Some Puerto Rico addresses include an urbanization or community code for a specific area or development. Addresses with an urbanization code, abbreviated URB, should be written on 4 lines:

MS MARIA SUAREZ URB LAS GLADIOLAS 150 CALLE A SAN JUAN PR 00926-3232

More Puerto Rico Address Examples

U.S. Virgin Islands

Virgin Islands addresses have the same format as standard addresses. The right abbreviation for this territory is "VI," not "US VI" or "USA VI":

MS JOAN SMITH RR 1 BOX 6601 KINGSHILL VI 00850-9802

Military and Diplomatic Mail (APO/FPO/DPO)

Mail to military and diplomatic addresses is treated differently:

  • Do not include the city or country name when you send something to an APO/FDO/DPO address in another country. This keeps your mail out of foreign mail networks.
  • Do include unit and box numbers if they're assigned:

SEAMAN JOSEPH SMITH UNIT 100100 BOX 4120 FPO AP 96691

More Details on Military Addresses

When you're done addressing your envelope, put what you're sending inside the envelope, then close and seal it (using the envelope's glue or tape).

Envelope and postcard, each with a stamp in the upper right corner

Step 3: Calculate Postage (& Add Insurance or Extra Services)

A First-Class Mail ® Forever stamp costs $0.68 and goes in the upper right corner of the envelope. (You can also use any combination of stamps that adds up to $0.68.)

If your letter is heavier or bigger, or if you want to add insurance or extra services like Certified Mail ® service, you'll pay more.

A standard postcard stamp costs $0.53 . (Large or square postcards will cost more.) Put the postcard stamp in the space provided near the delivery address.

cover letter no person to address

Postage for letters mostly depends on weight and size/shape. You can weigh your letter with a kitchen scale, postal scale , at a self-service kiosk, or at the Post Office ™ counter.

TIP: As a rule of thumb, you can send 1 oz (4 sheets of printer paper and a business-sized envelope) for 1 First-Class Mail ® Forever ® stamp (currently $0.68).

The postage for a large envelope (or flat) starts at $1.39 for 1 oz.

Where Can I Buy Postage?

  • The Postal Store ® Shop online for all stamps and add-on postage for oversized or heavier envelopes.
  • Post Office Locations Buy stamps at Post Office locations , self-service kiosks , or at National Retailers such as grocery and drug stores.

TIP: If you're sending larger envelopes (flats) using Priority Mail ® or Priority Mail Express ® service, you can use Click-N-Ship ® service to pay for and print your own postage online.

Additional Postage

If your envelope weighs over 1 oz, you can buy additional postage in the amount you need:

  • Each additional 1 oz is $0.24, for letters up to 3.5 oz and large envelopes up to 13 oz.
  • Nonmachinable items, including envelopes that are lumpy or rigid, or have clasps, string, or buttons will cost $0.44 more to send. You'll also have to pay more if your envelopes are square or vertical (taller than they are wide).
  • You can also buy 1¢, 2¢, 3¢, 4¢, 5¢, and 10¢ stamps at The Postal Store .

TIP: Put the stamp on last; that way, if you make a mistake at any other point, you won't waste a stamp.

Calculate a Price

Add-On Services

If you want insurance, proof of delivery, signature services, or other optional services, you'll have to pay extra.

Our Insurance & Extra Services page has more details; some of the more common add-on services for letters include:

  • Certified Mail ® : Get proof that you mailed your item and that the recipient signed for it.
  • Registered Mail ® : USPS's most secure mail service–mail is processed manually, handled separately and securely, and signed for along every step of its journey. The recipient must sign for the mail to confirm delivery (or attempted delivery).
  • Return Receipt: You'll get a printed or emailed delivery record showing the recipient's signature. You can combine Return Receipt with other services, including Certified Mail, Registered Mail, Priority Mail Express ® service, and more.
  • Adult Signature Required: Only an adult (age 21+) can sign for the mail after showing a valid government ID .

Postage Options

There are several ways to get postage for your envelope.

  • The Postal Store ® --> ® and Priority Mail Express ® envelopes.
  • Post Office ™ Locations --> ® such as grocery and drug stores.

Send your letter or postcard from your mailbox, a blue collection box, or Post Office.

Step 4: Send Your Mail

Once your envelope or postcard has the correct addresses and postage, you can send it several ways, including putting it in your mailbox or dropping it in a blue collection box or at a Post Office ™ location.

Send your letter or postcard from your mailbox, a blue collection box, or Post Office.

  • Put your letter inside your mailbox and raise the flag (if you have one).
  • If you have a cluster mailbox, drop it in the outgoing mail slot.
  • Drop it off in a blue collection box.
  • Take it to a Post Office lobby drop.

Important Note: If your envelope has postage stamps and weighs more than 10 oz or is thicker than 1/2", you can't put it in a collection box; you have to give it to an employee at a Post Office location. See more details on What Can and Cannot be Deposited in a Collection Box?

Bonus: Sending Mail Pro Tips

The Postal Service uses high-speed sorting machines to help process and deliver 425.3 million mail pieces each day. Here are some extra tips to improve your mail sending experience:

  • Stay flexible : Don't send rigid (hard) objects in paper envelopes.
  • Sending embellished invitations (for weddings, graduations, etc.)? Get them hand-canceled or put them inside another envelope.
  • Need tracking? Learn about your options.

Flexible and flat items only (like paper or photos, less than 1/4 inch thick). Rigid or lumpy Items (like keys or flash drives) can tear your envelope.

Stay Flexible

Postcards, letter envelopes, and large envelopes (flats) all need to bend to fit through USPS ® high-speed sorting machines.

  • OK: Flexible, flat things like stickers, photos, trading cards, etc. should be okay—as long as your envelope stays flat, not lumpy, and less than 1/4" thick.
  • Not OK: Don't put rigid objects (like flash drives, coins, keys, hard plastic card cases, etc.) loose in unpadded paper envelopes: They could get torn out of the envelope, jam the sorting machines, cause a delay, or even get lost.

Instead, for rigid and odd-shaped objects (or things you don't want to get bent), we recommend using a padded envelope or small box and sending it as a package .

Sending Embellished Invitations (for Weddings, Graduations, etc.)

If you want to send a specially decorated envelope (like some wedding invitations):

  • You can pay the extra fee for nonmachinable First-Class Mail ® items, bring your mail to the Post Office™ counter, and ask the retail associate to hand-cancel your embellished invitations.
  • For externally decorated invitations: If you use wax seals, strings, ribbons, etc. on your envelopes, don't try to send them exposed. Instead, to make sure your envelopes arrive looking the way your designer intended, put them inside another envelope .

Need Tracking?

Tracking is not available for First-Class Mail items. If you'd like to get tracking information for your letter:

  • You can pay extra to send your letter using Priority Mail Express ® or Priority Mail ® service.
  • You can get delivery confirmation by adding Certified Mail ® or Registered Mail ® service. (You can even combine it with Return Receipt if you want the recipient's signature.)

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  1. Cover Letter With No Name For Recipient

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  2. Cover Letter No Address

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  3. Cover Letter Address Unknown Recipient

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  4. a letter to someone who is leaving the job

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  5. Cover Letter No Contact Name

    cover letter no person to address

  6. what to include in your cover letter

    cover letter no person to address

VIDEO

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  5. Cover letter එකක් හදාගන්න හැටි II Cover letter for job II How to make a cover letter

  6. How to write a cover letter for a permanent residence application

COMMENTS

  1. How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name in 5 Steps

    Here are five steps on how to address a cover letter without a name: 1. Remain gender neutral. The first step to addressing a cover letter without a name is to use gender-neutral identifiers. Deepti Sharma spent several years in the corporate world before following her entrepreneurial spirit and starting her business as a human resources (HR ...

  2. 6 Examples: How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    This shows that you can connect and direct your message to the relevant person. Here are some examples: Dear Hiring Manager, - This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name. Dear [Job Title], - Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director.

  3. How to Address Cover Letters with No Name or Address

    Keep it professional. Sometimes your research won't turn up anything and you'll be left without a name to address. In that case, instead of addressing the letter to an individual, you can address the letter to the job title of the reader. For example, "Dear Hiring Manager of [Company].". If you can't narrow down a job title, there's ...

  4. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    Here are some common salutations that you should avoid when addressing your cover letter without a name: To Whom it May Concern - This salutation is considered outdated. Hey - A simple "hey" is too casual for a cover letter. Dear Sir/Madam - Many recruiters think this greeting is old-fashioned.

  5. 20 Examples Of How To Address a Cover Letter to an Unknown Recipient

    Even if you don't know the recipient's name, it's crucial to keep your language and tone professional throughout your cover letter. Provide examples of well-formatted cover letter salutations. Example 1: "Dear Hiring Manager," Example 2: "Dear IT Director," Example 3: "Dear Ms. Taylor Smith,"

  6. 10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

    Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it's a smaller company. Examples of how to address a cover letter: Dear Sir or Madam. Dear Hiring Manager. Dear Talent Acquisition Team. Dear [Company Name] HR Department. Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager. Dear Human Resources Manager.

  7. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    Address your letter to "Dear Hiring Manager.". This works as a last resort, as will the salutation "Dear Hiring Team.". Reserve these greetings for when you have no idea who the recipient of the letter will be. Whatever you do, don't skip writing a cover letter just because you can't find the name of the right person.

  8. How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

    How to Address the Contact Person . There are a variety of cover letter salutations you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren't given a contact person, check to see if you can determine the email recipient's name.

  9. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024 (with Examples)

    There's a right and wrong way to address a cover letter. Way #1: The employer thinks, "This applicant's got a brain.". Way #2: She thinks, "Yuck. Another dud.". It's not rocket science. Just pick the right salutation and the right address cover letter format. In this guide, you'll learn: Who to address a cover letter to.

  10. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name (5 Salutations)

    To help you figure out the name of the cover letter's recipient, here are some tips: Tip #1: Check the company's website. If you know the company's name and they have a website with contact information, that's usually the best place to start. Tip #2: Review job listing sites.

  11. How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name: 2023 Guide (10 ...

    If the hiring manager's gender is Male, address the hiring manager with "Mr.". For Example: "Mr. Xavier,". If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing. As you don't know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic "Ms..".

  12. How to Address Your Cover Letter in 2023

    Rule #1: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager using a formal, full-name salutation (if possible). For a cover letter, you should always default to addressing it to the hiring manager for the position you're applying to. Unless you know for sure that the culture of the company is more casual, use the hiring manager's first and ...

  13. How to Address a Cover Letter with No Name

    Dear Sir or Madam —This feels stilted. To Whom it May Concern —It concerns the hiring manager. Hello, Hi, or Greetings —It's a little to casual. Happy [Insert day of the week] —Way too casual. Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening —Who knows when they'll read it.

  14. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name? Top 5 Salutations

    In wrapping up, let's quickly recap the 5 best salutations to use for addressing your cover letter when the name is unknown: Dear Hiring Manager. Dear [Department] Team. Dear Recruiter. Dear Director of [Department] Dear Talent Acquisition Team. But remember, the strength of your cover letter lies in its content.

  15. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

    Dear Human Resources Recruitment Team, Alternatively, if you don't have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company's hiring staff, as follows: Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team. Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Staff.

  16. How to Address a Cover Letter (and Who to Address)

    Here are the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name: To Whom It May Concern. Dear Human Resources Director. Dear Hiring Manager. Dear Recruitment Manager. Additionally, if you want to add a personal touch, address your cover letter to your prospective department or manager.

  17. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024: Complete Guide

    Using a person's name in direct communication helps to establish a connection. So it's no wonder you should use it in the cover letter address! Start with Dear + recipient's first name or their first and last name. Use honorific titles such as Mr. or Ms. only if you're 100% certain of the recipient's gender identity.

  18. How to Address and End a Cover Letter: 25 Examples & Tips

    Mistake 1: Failing to address your cover letter to a specific person; Mistake 2: Addressing a cover letter to the wrong person; Most job postings don't specify who will be reading your cover letter. This puts job seekers in a tricky situation. Fixing the first mistake could cause you to make the second.

  19. How To Address a Cover Letter

    For example, 'Dear Austen Myers' is acceptable and considered a professional way to address a cover letter. If you know their gender and wish to use a title in the address, use either 'Ms.' or 'Mr.' to avoid inaccurately describing the recipient's marital status. For example, you'd write 'Dear Ms. Myers' rather than 'Dear ...

  20. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter #1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template #2. Put Contact Information in the Header #3. Address the Hiring Manager #4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction #5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details #6. Wrap It Up and Sign It Cover Letter Writing Checklist 15 Cover Letter Tips 15+ Cover Letter Examples 5 ...

  21. Cover Letter Templates and Examples for 2024

    3. Win the name game. If possible, address your cover letter to the hiring manager or project manager by name. This personal touch shows your attention to detail—and it's attention-grabbing. If the job post doesn't include a contact name, visit the company website or LinkedIn to try to find the right person.

  22. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  23. Letters

    See notice for return address. Demand for Tax Return (FTB 4601) Why you received this notice. We do not have a record of your California personal income tax return. ... This letter is used as a cover sheet when the FTB Customer did not respond to a request to provide information. What you need to do. Respond by electronic upload or by mail:

  24. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don't. Just be simple and straightforward: • "I'm writing to apply for your X ...

  25. How to Send a Letter or Postcard

    Step 1: Choose Envelope or Postcard. Envelopes are for sending flat, flexible things, like letters, cards, checks, forms, and other paper goods. For just 1 $0.68 First-Class Mail ® Forever ® stamp, you can send 1 oz (about 4 sheets of regular, 8-1/2" x 11" paper in a rectangular envelope) to anywhere in the U.S.! Show More.

  26. Free templates for social media, documents & designs

    Search for anything—style, topic, image, or color—or look around the catalog for inspiration. You'll find professionally designed templates for whatever you need to create. Find your template. 2. Customize it with help from AI. Change design, text, and video elements to match your style or brand, or use powerful AI features in our intuitive ...