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Legal Dissertation: Research and Writing Guide

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About This Page

Choosing a topic can be one of the most challenging aspects of writing an extensive paper. This page has resources to help you find topics and inspiration, before you get started on the in-depth research process.

Related Guides

Citation and Writing Resources

Legal Research Tutorials

Secondary Sources for Legal Research

Methods of Finding Cases

Methods of Finding Statutes

Current Awareness and Alerting Resources

Compiling State Legislative Histories

Locating International and Foreign Law Journals

This guide contains resources to help students researching and writing a legal dissertation or other upper-level writing project. Some of the resources in this guide are directed at researching and writing in general, not specifically on legal topics, but the strategies and tips can still be applied.

The Law Library maintains a number of other guides on related skills and topics that may be of interest:

The Wells Library also maintains guides. A few that may be helpful for managing research can be found here:

Choosing a Topic

This video discusses tips and strategies for choosing a dissertation topic.

Note: this video is not specific to legal dissertation topics, but it may still be of interest as an overview generally.

The Bloomberg/BNA publication United States Law Week can be a helpful resource for tracking down the major legal stories of the day.  Log into Bloomberg Law, in the big search box, start typing United States Law Week and the title will appear in the drop down menu beneath the box. This publication provides coverage of top legal news stories, and in-depth "insight" features.

If you have a general idea of the area of law you wish to write about, check out the Practice Centers on Bloomberg. From the homepage, click the Browse link in the top left-hand corner. Then select Practice Centers and look for your area of law. Practice Centers are helpful because they gather cases, statutes, administrative proceedings, news, and more on the selected legal area.

Bloomberg has other news sources available as well. From the homepage, click the Browse link in the top left-hand corner. Then select News and Analysis, then select News or Analysis, and browse the available topics.

If you know what area of law you'd like to write about, you may find the Browse Topics feature in Lexis Advance helpful for narrowing down your topic. 

Log into Lexis Advance, click the Browse Topics tab, and select a topic.  If you don't see your topic listed, try using the provided search bar to see whether your topic is categorized as a sub-topic within this list. 

Once you click on a topic, a box pops up with several options.  If you click on Get Topic Document, you'll see results listed in a number of categories, including Cases, Legislation, and more.  The News and Legal News categories at the right end of the list may help you identify current developments of interest for your note.  Don't forget about the filtering options on the left that will allow you to search within your results, narrow your jurisdiction, and more.

Similar to Lexis Advance, Westlaw Edge has a Topics tab that may be helpful if you know what area of law you'd like to write about.

Log onto Westlaw Edge, and click on the Topics tab.  This time, you won't be able to search within this list, so if you're area is not listed, you should either run a regular search from the main search bar at the top or try out some of the topics listed under this tab - once you click on a topic, you can search within its contents.

What is great about the Topics in Westlaw Edge is the Practitioner Insights page you access by clicking on a topic.  This is an information portal that allows you quick access to cases, legislation, top news, and more on your selected topic.

In United States federal courts, a circuit split occurs whenever two or more circuit courts of appeals issue conflicting rulings on the same legal question. Circuit splits are ripe for legal analysis and commentary because they present a situation in which federal law is being applied in different ways in different parts of the country, even if the underlying litigants themselves are otherwise similarly situated. The Supreme Court also frequently accepts cases on appeal that involve these types of conflicted rulings from various sister circuits.

To find a circuit split on a topic of interest to you, try searching on Lexis and Westlaw using this method:

in the search box, enter the following: (circuit or court w/s split) AND [insert terms or phrases to narrow the search]

You can also browse for circuit splits on Bloomberg. On the Bloomberg homepage, in the "Law School Success" box, Circuit Splits Charts appear listed under Secondary Sources.

Other sources for circuit splits are American Law Reports (ALR) and American Jurisprudence (AmJur). These publications provide summaries of the law, point out circuit splits, and provide references for further research.

"Blawgs" or law-related blogs are often written by scholars or practitioners in the legal field.  Ordinarily covering current events and developments in law, these posts can provide inspiration for note topics.  To help you find blawgs on a specific topic, consider perusing the ABA's Blawg Directory or Justia's Blawg Search .

Research Methodology

Types of research methodologies.

There are different types of research methodologies. Methodology refers to the strategy employed in conducting research. The following methodologies are some of the most commonly used in legal and social science research.

Doctrinal legal research methodology, also called "black letter" methodology, focuses on the letter of the law rather than the law in action. Using this method, a researcher composes a descriptive and detailed analysis of legal rules found in primary sources (cases, statutes, or regulations). The purpose of this method is to gather, organize, and describe the law; provide commentary on the sources used; then, identify and describe the underlying theme or system and how each source of law is connected.

Doctrinal methodology is good for areas of law that are largely black letter law, such as contract or property law. Under this approach, the researcher conducts a critical, qualitative analysis of legal materials to support a hypothesis. The researcher must identify specific legal rules, then discuss the legal meaning of the rule, its underlying principles, and decision-making under the rule (whether cases interpreting the rule fit together in a coherent system or not). The researcher must also identify ambiguities and criticisms of the law, and offer solutions. Sources of data in doctrinal research include the rule itself, cases generated under the rule, legislative history where applicable, and commentaries and literature on the rule.

This approach is beneficial by providing a solid structure for crafting a thesis, organizing the paper, and enabling a thorough definition and explanation of the rule. The drawbacks of this approach are that it may be too formalistic, and may lead to oversimplifying the legal doctrine.

Comparative

Comparative legal research methodology involves critical analysis of different bodies of law to examine how the outcome of a legal issue could be different under each set of laws. Comparisons could be made between different jurisdictions, such as comparing analysis of a legal issue under American law and the laws of another country, or researchers may conduct historical comparisons.

When using a comparative approach be sure to define the reasons for choosing this approach, and identify the benefits of comparing laws from different jurisdictions or time periods, such as finding common ground or determining best practices and solutions. The comparative method can be used by a researcher to better understand their home jurisdiction by analyzing how other jurisdictions handle the same issue. This method can also be used as a critical analytical tool to distinguish particular features of a law. The drawback of this method is that it can be difficult to find material from other jurisdictions. Also, researchers should be sure that the comparisons are relevant to the thesis and not just used for description.

This type of research uses data analysis to study legal systems. A detailed guide on empirical methods can be found here . The process of empirical research involves four steps: design the project, collect and code the data, analyze the data, determine best method of presenting the results. The first step, designing the project, is when researchers define their hypothesis and concepts in concrete terms that can be observed. Next, researchers must collect and code the data by determining the possible sources of information and available collection methods, and then putting the data into a format that can be analyzed. When researchers analyze the data, they are comparing the data to their hypothesis. If the overlap between the two is significant, then their hypothesis is confirmed, but if there is little to no overlap, then their hypothesis is incorrect. Analysis involves summarizing the data and drawing inferences. There are two types of statistical inference in empirical research, descriptive and causal. Descriptive inference is close to summary, but the researcher uses the known data from the sample to draw conclusions about the whole population. Causal inference is the difference between two descriptive inferences.

Two main types of empirical legal research are qualitative and quantitative.

Quantitative, or numerical, empirical legal research involves taking information about cases and courts, translating that information into numbers, and then analyzing those numbers with statistical tools.

Qualitative, or non-numerical, empirical legal research involves extracting  information from the text of court documents, then interpreting and organizing the text into categories, and using that information to identify patterns.

Drafting The Methodology Section

This is the part of your paper that describes the research methodology, or methodologies if you used more than one. This section will contain a detailed description of how the research was conducted and why it was conducted in that way. First, draft an outline of what you must include in this section and gather the information needed.

Generally, a methodology section will contain the following:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Reasons for the research methodology used
  • Description and rationale of the data collection tools, sampling techniques, and data sources used, including a description of how the data collection tools were administered
  • Discussion of the limitations
  • Discussion of the data analysis tools used

Be sure that you have clearly defined the reasoning behind the chosen methodology and sources.

  • Legal Reasoning, Research, and Writing for International Graduate Students Nadia E. Nedzel Aspen (2004) A guide to American legal research and the federal system, written for international students. Includes information on the research process, and tips for writing. Located in the Law Library, 3rd Floor: KF 240 .N43 2004.
  • Methodologies of Legal Research: Which Kind of Method for What Kind of Discipline? Mark van Hoecke Oxford (2013) This book examines different methods of legal research including doctrinal, comparative, and interdisciplinary. Located at Lilly Law Library, Indianapolis, 2nd Floor: K 235 .M476 2013. IU students may request item via IUCAT.
  • An Introduction to Empirical Legal Research Lee Epstein and Andrew D. Martin Oxford University Press (2014) This book includes information on designing research, collecting and coding data, analyzing data, and drafting the final paper. Located at Lilly Law Library, Indianapolis, 2nd Floor: K 85 .E678 2014. IU students may request item via IUCAT.
  • Emplirical Legal Studies Blog The ELS blog was created by several law professors, and focuses on using empirical methods in legal research, theory, and scholarship. Search or browse the blog to find entries on methodology, data sources, software, and other tips and techniques.

Literature Review

The literature review provides an examination of existing pieces of research, and serves as a foundation for further research. It allows the researcher to critically evaluate existing scholarship and research practices, and puts the new thesis in context. When conducting a literature review, one should consider the following: who are the leading scholars in the subject area; what has been published on the subject; what factors or subtopics have these scholars identified as important for further examination; what research methods have others used; what were the pros and cons of using those methods; what other theories have been explored.

The literature review should include a description of coverage. The researcher should describe what material was selected and why, and how those selections are relevant to the thesis. Discuss what has been written on the topic and where the thesis fits in the context of existing scholarship. The researcher should evaluate the sources and methodologies used by other researchers, and describe how the thesis different.

The following video gives an overview of conducting a literature review.

Note: this video is not specific to legal literature, however it may be helpful as a general overview.

Not sure where to start? Here are a few suggestions for digging into sources once you have selected a topic.

Research Guides

Research guides are discovery tools, or gateways of information. They pull together lists of sources on a topic. Some guides even offer brief overviews and additional research steps specifically for that topic. Many law libraries offer guides on a variety of subjects. You can locate guides by visiting library websites, such as this Library's site , the Law Library of Congress , or other schools like Georgetown . Some organizations also compile research guides, such as the American Society of International Law . Utilizing a research guide on your topic to generate an introductory source list can save you valuable time.

Secondary Sources

It is often a good idea to begin research with secondary sources. These resources summarize, explain, and analyze the law. They also provide references to primary sources and other secondary sources. This saves you time and effort, and can help you quickly identify major themes under your topic and help you place your thesis in context.

Encyclopedias provide broad coverage of all areas of the law, but do not go in-depth on narrow topics, or discuss differences by jurisdiction, or  include all of the pertinent cases. American Jurisprudence ( AmJur ) and Corpus Juris Secundum ( CJS ) have nationwide coverage, while the Indiana Law Encyclopedia focuses on Indiana state law. A number of other states also have their own state-specific encyclopedias.

American Law Reports ( ALR ) are annotations that synopsize various cases on narrow legal topics. Each annotation covers a different topic, and provides a leading or typical case on the topic, plus cases from different jurisdictions that follow different rules, or cases where different facts applying the same rule led to different outcomes. The annotations also refer to other secondary sources.  

Legal periodicals include several different types of publications such as law reviews from academic institutions or organizations, bar journals, and commercial journals/newspapers/newsletters. Legal periodicals feature articles that describe the current state of the law and often explore underlying policies. They also critique laws, court decisions, and policies, and often advocate for changes. Articles also discuss emerging issues and notify the profession of new developments. Law reviews can be useful for in-depth coverage on narrow topics, and references to primary and other secondary sources. However, content can become outdated and researchers must be mindful of biases in articles. 

Treatises/Hornbooks/Practice Guides are a type of secondary source that provides comprehensive coverage of a legal subject. It could be broad, such as a treatise covering all of contract law, or very narrow such as a treatise focused only on search and seizure cases. These sources are good when you have some general background on the topic, but you need more in-depth coverage of the legal rules and policies. Treatises are generally well organized, and provide you with finding aids (index, table of contents, etc.) and extensive footnotes or endnotes that will lead you to primary sources like cases, statutes, and regulations. They may also include appendices with supporting material like forms. However, treatises may not be updated as frequently as other sources and may not cover your specific issue or jurisdiction.

Citation and Writing Style

  • Legal Writing in Plain English Bryan A. Garner University of Chicago Press, 2001. Call # KF 250 .G373 2001 Location: Law Library, 3rd Floor Provides lawyers, judges, paralegals, law students, and legal scholars with sound advice and practical tools for improving their written work. The leading guide to clear writing in the field, this book offers valuable insights into the writing process: how to organize ideas, create and refine prose, and improve editing skills. This guide uses real-life writing samples that Garner has gathered through decades of teaching experience. Includes sets of basic, intermediate, and advanced exercises in each section.
  • The Elements of Legal Style Bryan A. Garner Oxford University Press, 2002. Call # KF 250 .G37 2002 Location: Law Library, 1st Floor, Reference This book explains the full range of what legal writers need to know: mechanics, word choice, structure, and rhetoric, as well as all the special conventions that legal writers should follow in using headings, defined terms, quotations, and many other devices. Garner also provides examples from highly regarded legal writers, including Oliver Wendell Holmes, Clarence Darrow, Frank Easterbrook, and Antonin Scalia.
  • Grammarly Blog Blog featuring helpful information about quirks of the English language, for example when to use "affect" or "effect" and other tips. Use the search feature to locate an article relevant to your grammar query.
  • Plain English for Lawyers Richard C. Wydick Carolina Academic Press, 2005. Call # KF 250 .W9 2005 Location: Law Library, 3rd Floor Award-winning book that contains guidance to improve the writing of lawyers and law students and to promote the modern trend toward a clear, plain style of legal writing. Includes exercises at the end of each chapter.
  • The Chicago Manual of Style University of Chicago Press, 2010. Call # Z 253 .U69 2010 Location: Law Library, 2nd Floor While not addressing legal writing specifically, The Chicago Manual of Style is one of the most widely used and respected style guides in the United States. It focuses on American English and deals with aspects of editorial practice, including grammar and usage, as well as document preparation and formatting.
  • The Chicago Manual of Style (Online) Bryan A. Garner and William S. Strong The University of Chicago Press, 2017. Online edition: use the link above to view record in IUCAT, then click the Access link (for IU students only).
  • The Bluebook Compiled by the editors of the Columbia Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and the Yale Law Journal. Harvard Law Review Association, 2015. Call # KF245 .B58 2015 Location: Law Library, 1st Floor, Circulation Desk The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation is a style guide that prescribes the most widely used legal citation system in the United States. The Bluebook is taught and used at a majority of U.S. law schools, law reviews and journals, and used in a majority of U.S. federal courts.
  • User's Guide to the Bluebook Alan L. Dworsky William S. Hein & Co., Inc., 2015. Call # KF 245 .D853 2015 Location: Law Library, Circulation Desk "This User's Guide is written for practitioners (law students, law clerks, lawyers, legal secretaries and paralegals), and is designed to make the task of mastering citation form as easy and painless as possible. To help alleviate the obstacles faced when using proper citation form, this text is set up as a how-to manual with a step-by-step approach to learning the basic skills of citation and includes the numbers of the relevant Bluebook rules under most chapter subheadings for easy reference when more information is needed"--Provided by the publisher.
  • Legal Citation in a Nutshell Larry L. Teply West Academic Publishing, 2016. Call # KF 245 .T47 2016 Location: Law Library, 1st Floor, Circulation Desk This book is designed to ease the task of learning legal citation. It initially focuses on conventions that underlie all accepted forms and systems of legal citation. Building on that understanding and an explanation of the “process” of using citations in legal writing, the book then discusses and illustrates the basic rules.
  • Introduction to Basic Legal Citation (Online) Peter W. Martin Cornell Legal Information Institute, 2017. Free online resource. Includes a thorough review of the relevant rules of appellate practice of federal and state courts. It takes account of the latest edition of The Bluebook, published in 2015, and provides a correlation table between this free online citation guide and the Bluebook.
  • Last Updated: Oct 24, 2019 11:00 AM
  • URL: https://law.indiana.libguides.com/dissertationguide

HLS Dissertations, Theses, and JD Papers

S.j.d. dissertations, ll.m. papers, ll.m. theses, j.d. papers, submitting your paper to an online collection, other sources for student papers beyond harvard, getting help, introduction.

This is a guide to finding Harvard Law School (“HLS”) student-authored works held by the Library and in online collections. This guide covers HLS S.J.D Dissertations, LL.M. papers, J.D. third-year papers, seminar papers, and prize papers.

There have been changes in the HLS degree requirements for written work. The library’s collection practices and catalog descriptions for these works has varied. Please note that there are gaps in the library’s collection and for J.D. papers, few of these works are being collected any longer.

If we have an S.J.D. dissertation or LL.M. thesis, we have two copies. One is kept in the general collection and one in the Red Set, an archival collection of works authored by HLS affiliates. If we have a J.D. paper, we have only one copy, kept in the Red Set. Red Set copies are last resort copies available only by advance appointment in Historical and Special Collections .

Some papers have not been processed by library staff. If HOLLIS indicates a paper is “ordered-received” please use this form to have library processing completed.

The HLS Doctor of Juridical Science (“S.J.D.”) program began in 1910.  The library collection of these works is not comprehensive. Exceptions are usually due to scholars’ requests to withhold Library deposit. 

  • HLS S.J.D. Dissertations in HOLLIS To refine these search results by topic or faculty advisor, or limit by date, click Add a New Line.
  • Hein’s Legal Theses and Dissertations Microfiche Mic K556.H45x Drawers 947-949 This microfiche set includes legal theses and dissertations from HLS and other premier law schools. It currently includes about 300 HLS dissertations and theses.
  • Hein's Legal Theses and Dissertations Contents List This content list is in order by school only, not by date, subject or author. It references microfiche numbers within the set housed in the Microforms room on the entry level of the library, drawers 947-949. The fiche are a different color for each institution.
  • ProQuest Dissertations and Theses @ Harvard University (Harvard login) Copy this search syntax: dg(S.J.D.) You will find about 130 SJD Dissertations dated from 1972 to 2004. They are not available in full text.
  • DASH Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard Sponsored by Harvard University’s Office for Scholarly Communication, DASH is an open repository for research papers by members of the Harvard community. There are currently about 600 HLS student papers included. Unfortunately it is not possible to search by type of paper or degree awarded.

The Master of Laws (“LL.M.”) degree has been awarded since 1923. Originally, the degree required completion of a major research paper, akin to a thesis. Since 1993, most students have the option of writing the LL.M. "short paper."  This is a 25-page (or longer) paper advised by a faculty supervisor or completed in conjunction with a seminar.  Fewer LL.M. candidates continue to write the more extensive "long-paper." LL.M. candidates holding J.D.s from the U.S. must write the long paper.

  • HLS Written Work Requirements for LL.M. Degree The current explanation of the LL.M. written work requirement for the master of laws.

The library generally holds HLS LL.M. long papers and short papers. In recent years, we require author release in order to do so. In HOLLIS, no distinction is made between types of written work created in satisfaction of the LL.M. degree; all are described as LL.M. thesis. Though we describe them as thesis, the law school refers to them solely as papers or in earlier years, essays. HOLLIS records indicate the number of pages, so at the record level, it is possible to distinguish long papers.

  • HLS LL.M. Papers in HOLLIS To refine these search results by topic, faculty advisor, seminar or date, click Add a New Line.

HLS LL.M. Papers are sometimes available in DASH and Hein's Legal Dissertations and Theses. See descriptions above .

The HLS J.D. written work requirement has changed over time. The degree formerly required a substantial research paper comparable in scope to a law review article written under faculty supervision, the "third year paper." Since 2008, J.D. students have the option of using two shorter works instead.

Of all those written, the library holds relatively few third-year papers. They were not actively collected but accepted by submission from faculty advisors who deemed a paper worthy of institutional retention. The papers are described in HOLLIS as third year papers, seminar papers, and student papers. Sometimes this distinction was valid, but not always. The faculty deposit tradition more or less ended in 2006, though the possibility of deposit still exists. 

  • J.D. Written Work Requirement
  • Faculty Deposit of Student Papers with the Library

HLS Third Year Papers in HOLLIS

To refine these search results by topic, faculty advisor, seminar or date, click Add a New Line.

  • HLS Student Papers Some third-year papers and LL.M. papers were described in HOLLIS simply as student papers. To refine these search results, click "Add a New Line" and add topic, faculty advisor, or course title.
  • HLS Seminar Papers Note that these include legal research pathfinders produced for the Advanced Legal Research course when taught by Virginia Wise.

Prize Papers

HLS has many endowed prizes for student papers and essays. There are currently 16 different writing prizes. See this complete descriptive list with links to lists of winners from 2009 to present. Note that there is not always a winner each year for each award. Prize winners are announced each year in the commencement pamphlet.

The Library has not specifically collected prize papers over the years but has added copies when possible. The HOLLIS record for the paper will usually indicate its status as a prize paper. The most recent prize paper was added to the collection in 2006.

Addison Brown Prize Animal Law & Policy Program Writing Prize Victor Brudney Prize Davis Polk Legal Profession Paper Prize Roger Fisher and Frank E.A. Sander Prize Yong K. Kim ’95 Memorial Prize Islamic Legal Studies Program Prize on Islamic Law Laylin Prize LGBTQ Writing Prize Mancini Prize Irving Oberman Memorial Awards John M. Olin Prize in Law and Economics Project on the Foundations of Private Law Prize Sidney I. Roberts Prize Fund Klemens von Klemperer Prize Stephen L. Werner Prize

  • Harvard Law School Prize Essays (1850-1868) A historical collection of handwritten prize essays covering the range of topics covered at that time. See this finding aid for a collection description.

The following information about online repositories is not a recommendation or endorsement to participate.

  • ProQuest Dissertations and Theses HLS is not an institutional participant to this collection. If you are interested in submitting your work, refer to these instructions and note that there is a fee required, which varies depending on the format of submission.
  • EBSCO Open Dissertations Relatively new, this is an open repository of metadata for dissertations. It is an outgrowth of the index American Doctoral Dissertations. The aim is to cover 1933 to present and, for modern works, to link to full text available in institutional repositories. Harvard is not one of the institutional participants.
  • DASH Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard

Sponsored by Harvard University’s Office for Scholarly Communication, this is an open repository for research papers by members of the Harvard community. See more information about the project. 

Some HLS students have submitted their degree paper to DASH.  If you would like to submit your paper, you may use this authorization form  or contact June Casey , Librarian for Open Access Initiatives and Scholarly Communication at Harvard Law School.

  • ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (Harvard Login) Covers dissertations and masters' theses from North American graduate schools and many worldwide. Provides full text for many since the 1990s and has descriptive data for older works.
  • NDLTD Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations Union Catalog Worldwide in scope, NDLTD contains millions of records of electronic theses and dissertations from the early 1900s to the present.
  • Law Commons of the Digital Commons Network The Law Commons has dissertations and theses, as well as many other types of scholarly research such as book chapters and conference proceedings. They aim to collect free, full-text scholarly work from hundreds of academic institutions worldwide.
  • EBSCO Open Dissertations Doctoral dissertations from many institutions. Free, open repository.
  • Dissertations from Center for Research Libraries Dissertations found in this resource are available to the Harvard University Community through Interlibrary Loan.
  • British Library EThOS Dissertation source from the British Library listing doctoral theses awarded in the UK. Some available for immediate download and some others may be requested for scanning.
  • BASE from Bielefeld University Library Index of the open repositoris of most academic institutions. Includes many types of documents including doctoral and masters theses.

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dissertation in law

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Presented here is a selection of theses and dissertations from the School of Law. Please note that this is not a complete record of all degrees awarded by the School.

This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. In most cases, these works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

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dissertation in law

Stanford Law School | Robert Crown Law Library

Stanford Law School's Theses and Dissertations Collection

  • Early Thesis and Dissertation of Stanford Law School, 1929 to 1956
  • Theses and Dissertations of Stanford Law School,1970-1995
  • Stanford Program in International Legal Studies’ Theses, 1996 to 2010
  • Stanford Law School’s Dissertations, 1996 to 2010
  • Stanford Program in International Legal Studies Theses, 2011 to 2025

Title: Stanford Law School’s Dissertations, 1996 to 2010

Title: Stanford Law School’s Dissertations Inclusive Dates: 1996 to 2010

Access Restrictions: None Copyright Restriction:  Property rights reside with Robert Crown Law Library Special Collection.  Copyrights are retained by the creator of the records or their heirs.

Series Description:

This series consists of dissertations produced by Stanford Law School’s candidates in the Doctor of the Science of Law or the Doctor of Jurisprudence programs during the years of 1996 to 2010.  Each dissertation is original research that each individual submit to a committee of Stanford law professors to prove that they add substantial original scholarly works.  Subject matter that Dissertation covers is diverse in nature. This series is arranged by call number and author's last name. 

Extent: 3 linear feet (textual) Location(s) : GS-SU-06-02-01 to GS-SU-06-01-06

3781 1996 C - Environmental Protection Under and After Socialism: A Study of Poland  3781 1996 C - Riverrun: Three Essays about the Uses of History in Legal Problems Concerning Native Americans  3781 1996 D - Do you Speak Genomics?: Patenting Biotechnology "Translation" Inventions and Other Macromolecules  3781 1996 S - Corporate Governance in Quasi Public Corporations: A New Perspective in Cameroon   3781 1997 B - Innovation Market Concept: A Model for European Merger Control?  3781 1997 E - The Dispute Settlement System in the Egyptian Capital Market and Economic Development  3781 1997 H - Private Property, Culture, and Ideology: Israel's Supreme Court and the Jurisprudence of Land Expropriation 3781 1997 Y - Medical Malpractice in Taiwan: Myth and Reality  3781 1997 Z - A Critical Analysis of the Ethical Duty of Confidentiality in the American law 3781 1998 B - The accommodation of Interests in Freedom of the Press and Protection of Reputation in the Constitutional Doctrine of the United States and Spain   3781 1998 C - Differential Treatment in International Law: A New Framework for the Realisation of Sustainable Development   3781 1998 C - International Tax Policy Under NAFTA: The Impact of National Tax Differences on Capital Flows under Regional Trade and Investment Integration   3781 1998 C - Telecommunications Reform in Mexico: Challenges for Entering the Global Digital Economy  3781 1998 H - Rethinking the Legal Structure of Bank Securities Powers: "Universal Banking" vs. the "Glass-Steagall Act" in Taiwan   3781 1998 K - Property Rights and Biodiversity Management in Kenya: The Case of Land Tenure Regimes and Wildlife Management 3781 1998 L - Economic and Sociological Theories of Contingent Employment: Critique and Implications for Law Reform   3781 1998 N - Copyright and a Democratic Civil Society   3781 1998 R - Constitutional Gravity and Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Unitary Theory of Public Civil Dispute Resolution 3781 1998 Y - Embedded Strategies, Corporate Partners, and Markets in the Digital Age  3781 1999 C - Assessing the Impacts of Trade Liberalization on Forests  3781 1999 D - The Impact of Plant Intellectual Property Rights on Thailand's Agriculture: Implications of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)  3781 1999 Y - International Strategic Alliances in High Technology Industries: A Law and Economic Analysis From an Antitrust Perspective  3781 2000 D - Volume 1 Sexual Harassment Law: History, Cases, and Theory  3781 2000 D - Volume 2 Sexual Harassment Law: History, Cases, and Theory  3781 2000 K - Restructuring the Liability Regime in the Oil Pollution Act of 1990  3781 2000 L - Minimal State and Distributive Justice: An Essay on Nozick's Theory with Some Comparative Aspects to Rawls' 3781 2000 O - Law, Gender Relations and Social Change in Nigeria 3781 2000 W - Environmental Pollution in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria: A Case for Direct Equity Participation

3 781 2001 C - Self-Censorship and the Struggle for Press Freedom in Hong Kong 3781 2001 H - Administrative Litigation and Court Reform in the People's Republic of China  3781 2001 H - Critical Eating: Genetically Engineered Foods in International Relations: Designing International Bodies on Risk Management in Evolving Science & Technology with Global Impact  3781 2001 R - Counsel for the Indigent Accused in the United States and the Republic of Korea: Constitutional Reflections and Suggestions for Changes in the South Korean Criminal Justice System  3781 2001 R - Strategic Alliances in the United States Microelectronics Industry 3781 2001 W - Four Traces of Michelman and Sunstein's Legal Republicanism: Republican Historiography, Communitarianism, Habermasian Philosophy and Rawlsian Liberalism   3781 2001 W - The Comparison of Prosecutorial Functions in the U.S.A. and in Taiwan 3781 2001 Z - Human Rights Law and Public Interest Lawyering: A Study on the Interdependence of Jurisprudence and the Legal Profession in Israel 3781 2002 C - Environmental Cooperation Institution Building in Northeast Asia 3781 2002 E - Personal Bankruptcy in Israel  3781 2002 L - Custody Decisions in Social and Cultural contexts: The Best Interests of the Child Standard and Judges' Custody Decisions in Taiwan  3781 2002 L - Legal Culture and Social Change: The Case of Taiwanese Family Law Development  3781 2002 M - A Tale of Two Networks: Interconnection in Early Telephony and the Comme[r]cial Internet  3781 2002 M - A Tale of Two Networks: Interconnection in Early Telephony and the Comme[r]cial Internet  3781 2002 R - 2001: A Space Odyssey: Law, Space, and Society in Contemporary Israel  3781 2002 T - The Political Economy of Regulatory Competition: A Diachronic Institutional Theory of Legal Change in an Era of Globalization  3781 2002 W - Crypto Policy and Online Public Forums  3781 2003 B - The Puzzle of Mass Torts: A Comparative Study of Asbestos Litigation  3781 2003 J - Pharmaceutical Differential Pricing: Reality or Wishful Thinking?  3781 2003 S - Constructing Copyright and Literary Creativity in Kenya Cultural Politics and the Political Economy of Transnational Intellectual Property  3781 2003 X - Mediation in China and the United States: Toward Common Outcome  3781 2004 H - Why Do They Not Obey the Law?: A Case Study of a Rural-Urban Migrant Enclave in China  3781 2004 L - Unfinished Business: Challenging Microsoft in Taiwan 3781 2004 M - Kiamas: Rethinking Access to Justice in Domestic Violence Cases in Kenya  3781 2004 N - Commercializing Motion Pictures and Sound Recordings Through the Internet: Copyright Law and Technological Change  3781 2004 P - Balancing in Constitutional Law: A Suggested Analytical Framework Applied to American Constitutional Law  3781 2004 S - An Analysis of the Political Economy of Japanese Fisheries: The Dynamics of Bureaucratic Policymaking in Domestic and International Fisheries 3781 2005 A - An Attempt to Mediate Immigrant Integration: Intercultural Mediators in Catalonia  3781 2005 C - Paying for Nature Conservation with Tax Dollars?: An Evaluation of the Role of Fiscal Policy Reform in Promoting Biodiversity Conservation in Canada through Legal, Economic, Ecological, Fiscal and Political Lenses   3781 2006 A - Banking System in Islamic Countries: Saudi Arabia and Egypt  3781 2006 A - Democratic Deliberation of Trade Legislation in Ghana: Institutions, Interests and Accountability 3781 2006 A - The Legal Culture of the European Court of Human Rights  3781 2006 H - Women's Experience in Court: The Implementation of Feminist Law Reforms in Civil Proceedings Concerning Domestic Violence  3781 2006 L - Divorce and Annulment in San Mateo County, California 1950-1957  3781 2006 N - Toward Better-Balanced Copyright Regulations in the Digital and Network Era: Law, Technology, and the Market in the U.S. and Japan 3781 2006 P - Criminal Investigation and Prosecution in Mexico City: A Case Study of Miguel Hidalgo County and its Ministerio Público  3781 2006 Y - Legal Risk and Investment in India: A Case Study of the Dabhol Power Project  3781 2007 C - Unbundling Path Dependence: A Case Study of Telecommunications Reform in Mexico (1990-2006)  3781 2007 G - All in the Family: The Influence of Social Networks on Dispute Processing: A Case Study of a Developing Economy 3781 2007 H - Social Symmetry: A Theory of Altruism and Cooperation 3781 2007 L - From Imitation to Innovation: The Role of Patent in China's Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries  3781 2007 M - Clientelism, Competition and Corruption: Informal Institutions and Telecommunications Reform in Kenya 3781 2007 W - Legal Framework for the Development of Venture Capital in China: Policy Recommendations for the Establishment of a Growth Enterprise Market ("GEM")        3781 2008 M - Rules and Engagement: A Comparative Qualitative Evaluation of European Union Rule-of-law Promotion in Romania, Turkey, Serbia, and Ukraine  3781 2008 N - The Role of Competition Law and Policy in the Economic Development of Korea 3781 2008 P - "In the Public Interest": Threats to Self-regulation of the Legal Profession in Ontario, 1998-2006   3781 2008 P - The Next Generation of Mexican Lawyers: A Study of Mexico's System of Legal Education and its Law Students  3781 2008 S - Beyond Legalism: The Mexican Supreme Court in the Democratic Era  3781 2009 L - The Neglected Role of Non-Profit Organizations in the Intellectual-Commons Environment  3781 2009 P - The Political-Economy and the Causes of Compliance of Trade and Investment Agreements: NAFTA and the Sweeteners Sector  3781 2009 S - "Outside the Pale of the Law": The Processing of Disputes in Buduburam Refugee Camp in Ghana  3781 2009 S - Recalcitrant Victims and Refractory Systems: An Exploratory Study of Attrition During the Investigation of rape Complaints in Post-Apartheid South Africa 3781 2009 T - The Design of Micro Credit Contracts and Costs of Credit: A Case Study of Micro Enterprise Finance in Uganda  3781 2010 C - Improving the Business Climate Under the Hot Sun: Do Small Business Associations Make a Difference?: A Study of Four Districts in Nyanza Province, Kenya 3781 2010 F - From Gender Based-Violence to Women's Violence in Haiti  3781 2010 F - From State Street to Bilski: Patent Protection in the Financial Industry 3781 2010 L - Weak Independent Directors, Strong Controlling Shareholders: Do Independent Directors Constrain Tunneling in Taiwan? 3781 2010 M - Access to Justice and Resolution of Criminal Cases at Informal Chiefs' Courts: The Ewe of Ghana 3781 2010 O - Measuring Japan's Nursery Quality Within the UNCRC Framework: International Standards for Young Children's Social Services and Their Implications for Japan   3781 2010 S - How do Principals Deal with Underperforming Teachers?: A Study of How Principals from Secondary Schools in Mexico City Manage Underperforming Teachers   3781 2010 T - Cross-border Enforcement of Patents

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Law dissertations : a step-by-step guide.

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Lammasniemi, Laura (2021) Law dissertations : a step-by-step guide. London: Routledge. ISBN 9780367568771

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Law Dissertations: A Step-by-Step Guide provides you with all the guidance and information you need to complete and succeed in your LLB, LLM or law-related dissertation. Written in a simple, clear format and with plenty of tools to help you to put the theory into practice, Laura Lammasniemi will show you how to make writing your law dissertation easy, without compromising intellectual rigour.

As well as explaining the process of research and outlining the various legal methodologies, the book also provides practical, step-by-step guidance on how to formulate a proposal, research plan, and literature review. Unlike other law research skills books, it includes a section on empirical research methodology and ethics for the benefit of students who are studying for a law-related degree.

Packed full of exercises, worked examples and tools for self-evaluation, this book is sure to become your essential guide, supporting you on every step of your journey in writing your law dissertation.

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  1. Legal Dissertation: Research and Writing Guide">Legal Dissertation: Research and Writing Guide

    About This Guide. This guide contains resources to help students researching and writing a legal dissertation or other upper-level writing project. Some of the resources in this guide are directed at researching and writing in general, not specifically on legal topics, but the strategies and tips can still be applied.

  2. Dissertations, Theses, and JD Papers - Harvard Library Guides">HLS Dissertations, Theses, and JD Papers - Harvard Library Guides

    The Law Commons has dissertations and theses, as well as many other types of scholarly research such as book chapters and conference proceedings. They aim to collect free, full-text scholarly work from hundreds of academic institutions worldwide.

  3. Law thesis and dissertation collection - University of Edinburgh">Law thesis and dissertation collection - University of Edinburgh

    Worldmaking powers of law and performance: queer politics beyond/against neoliberal legalism . Prado Fernandes, André (The University of Edinburgh, 2022-12-15) This thesis examines the worldmaking powers of the law and of performances, two crucial sites/strategies of historical importance for LGBT and queer activists and artists.

  4. Law Dissertation - what is expected? - LawTeacher.net">Writing a Law Dissertation - what is expected? - LawTeacher.net

    Writing a Law Dissertation and what is expected. The following notes are intended to provide the student with an overview of what is expected, or required, in relation to undertaking/completing a dissertation, and to assist the student avoid some of the inevitable confusion that surrounds the commencement of a dissertation.

  5. Law Dissertation Methodology - LawTeacher.net">Writing A Law Dissertation Methodology - LawTeacher.net

    This method of dissertation research aims to reduce the study of law to an essentially descriptive analysis of a large number of technical and co-ordinated legal rules to be found in primary sources. The primary aim of this method of research is to collate, organise and describe legal rules and to offer commentary on the emergence and ...

  6. Law Dissertation - LawTeacher.net">Writing a Masters Law Dissertation - LawTeacher.net

    For the majority of LLM courses a dissertation, sometimes known as a thesis or final assignment, will be a document of 10,000 words or above which presents the findings of research into a specific area of the law studied during the course.

  7. Law Dissertations | A Step-by-Step Guide | Laura Lammasniemi | Taylor">Law Dissertations | A Step-by-Step Guide | Laura Lammasniemi |...

    ABSTRACT. Law Dissertations: A Step-by-Step Guide provides law students with all the guidance and information they need to complete and succeed in their LLB, LLM or law-related dissertation. Written in an accessible, clear format and with plenty of tools to help put the theory into practice, Laura Lammasniemi will show students how to make ...

  8. a Postgraduate Dissertation in Law at Masters Level - SSRN">Writing a Postgraduate Dissertation in Law at Masters Level -...

    Abstract. This paper offers guidance to law students about to write a postgraduate dissertation on a taught Masters programme. This complements the webpage on writing law essays on conlawfiles.org but is intended more for postgraduate law students on a Masters programme who are writing a substantial 10-20,000 word dissertation.

  9. Law School's Theses and Dissertations Collection">Stanford Law School's Theses and Dissertations Collection

    This series consists of dissertations produced by Stanford Law School’s candidates in the Doctor of the Science of Law or the Doctor of Jurisprudence programs during the years of 1996 to 2010. Each dissertation is original research that each individual submit to a committee of Stanford law professors to prove that they add substantial ...

  10. Law dissertations : a step-by-step guide - WRAP: Warwick Research ...">Law dissertations : a step-by-step guide - WRAP: Warwick Research...

    Law Dissertations: A Step-by-Step Guide provides you with all the guidance and information you need to complete and succeed in your LLB, LLM or law-related dissertation. Written in a simple, clear format and with plenty of tools to help you to put the theory into practice, Laura Lammasniemi will show you how to make writing your law ...