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AS and A Level: Case Studies and Analysis

  • Business Studies
  • Case Studies and Analysis

Business Economics

Business Economics

Reasons fuel prices is increased rapidly? * Because of the hurricane Katrina devastation which destroyed nine (9) oil refineries in the US Gulf Cost of Mexico which has resulted in less oil being refined. * Because of the high increase in air travel which has seen the number of passengers traveling in the last ten (10) years doubled. As a result of this passengers are being charged more as it cost airline operators more to fill up their planes due to the limited amount of oil supply available. * Because oil reserves are running out. * Because of China's rapidly expanding economy which has created a huge demand boost. * Because of greater need for crude oil suitable for processing into petrol for the fuel Sport Utility Vehicles. E.g. (SUVs) popular with US drivers. * Due to Global economic expansion which is driving what the International Energy Agency says is the "biggest increase in oil demand for 24 years". * Because as the world major oil consumers remain dependent on the Middle East for their oil, and due to recent violence in Iraq and Saudi Arabia, this has raised fears on interruption to supplies as Iraqi exports have been cut by sabotage attacks on their oil facilities. * Lastly analysts also view that political tension in non-Middle East states such as Nigeria and Venezuela are having the potential to disrupt exports and has a result in prices of oil driving

  • Word count: 966
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Business Studies

Sweet Homes Inc. was founded in 1978 by Diamond Inc. to bring the warehouse retailing concept to the home center industry. The company operated retail do-it-yourself (DIY) warehouse stores

Sweet Homes Inc. was founded in 1978 by Diamond Inc. to bring the warehouse retailing concept to the home center industry. The company operated retail do-it-yourself (DIY) warehouse stores

SWEET HOMES INC. The difference between a company with a concept and one without is the difference between a stock that sells for 20 times earnings and one that sells for 10 times earnings. Sweet Homes Inc. is definitely a concept stock and it has he multiple to prove it- 27 to 28 times likely earnings in the current fiscal year. On the face of it, Sweet Homes might Seem like a tough one for concept managers to work with. It is a chain of hardware stores. These Hardware stores are huge warehouse outlets - 60,000 - 80,000 feet space. You can fit a awful lot of saws in these and still have plenty of room left over to knock together a very decent concept. The truth is, the warehouse notion is the hottest thing in retail these days. Sweet homes buys in quantum quantities which mean its suppliers are eager to keep within its good graces and hence provide it with lot of extra service. The company , as it happens is a master in promotion and pricing. It has 22 stores, all of them located where the sun shines all the time. Growth has been sizzling, Revenues are mere $22millon is fiscal '80 shot past the quarter billion mark three years later. As to earnings, they have climbed from 2 cnts in fiscal '80 to 60 cents in the fiscal year coming to an end [in Jan, 1985] They're confidently estimating 30% growth in the new fiscal year as well. COMPANY BACKGROUND Sweet Homes Inc. was

  • Word count: 1457

Business (Thames Water), Strenghts, Recommendations and Conclusion

Business (Thames Water), Strenghts, Recommendations and Conclusion

Strengths: - The strengths refer to the competitive advantages and other distinctive competencies that a company can exert in the marketplace. My research has different strengths that include questionnaires, pupils who filled the questionnaires, communications with pupils, Interview with staff in the canteen, and Internet reports. The first strength of my primary research was questionnaires. I made approximately 28 questionnaires and distributed in four different year groups. The age range was 14-19 year old which means that I distributed the questionnaires in year 10, year 11, year 12 and year 13. The questionnaires were filled out by both Males and Females. The total numbers of females were 12. However the numbers of male compare to females were high but females filled out the questionnaire in every year. The most common were females. In the questionnaires there were questions about likes & dislikes, packaging and pricing. The questionnaires were the dominant factor for a successful primary research. The students were very helpful as I approach to them with questionnaires they filled it out happily with no bad communication. They filled out the questionnaires with hustling. They wrote truthful information about what they think of water. The secondary research includes two different types of researches. The first one was with the canteen staff followed by Internet

  • Word count: 705

Unit 12 - International Dimensions of Business - Task 4

Unit 12 - International Dimensions of Business - Task 4

Task 4 For the final task of this unit, I will be critically appraising the advantages and disadvantages of the growth and influence of a MNC (multi-national company) of my choice. With this, I will be examining the strategic reasons for expansion whilst examining the impact it would have/has on a developing host country in terms of factors such as consumer's choice, employment rates, individuals/citizens, other businesses (competition), etc. Finally, I will also be assessing the impact it has on developed host countries and the impact it would have on their governments. The business I have decided to choose is Ryan Air because as I have been working on it throughout this unit, I believe I will find it easier to relate certain to topics and theories to it. Strategic Reasons why RyanAir Expanded For the first part of this task, I will be giving strategic reasons why RyanAir decided to expand internationally. First and foremost, most basic reason why RyanAir must have wanted to expand internationally is because that is the concept of what flight services are, going from one country to another consistently and safely and as this is RyanAir's service there was basically no other choice but to expand. However. Below are some other basic strategic reasons as to why they may have decided to expand. Geographic Diversion (RyanAir) Geographic diversion is a situation where

  • Word count: 2863

Tescos - types of stores, services offered and the people who worked there.

Tescos - types of stores, services offered and the people who worked there.

Introduction Tesco is the biggest private sector employer in the UK with over 250,000 employees and over 1,800 stores. Tesco works hard to meet its customers' needs and that's the only reason Tesco is successful. Tesco has four different store formats, each tailored to customers' needs, and these four store formats are as following: * Express (up to 3,000 sq ft) * Metro (approx. 7,000-15,000 sq ft) * Superstore (approx. 20,000-50,000 sq ft) * Extra (approx. 60,000 sq ft and above) Express Express stores offer customers great value, quality and fresh food close to where they live and work. Tesco opened its first Express store in 1994 and now they have over 650 stores selling a range of up to 7,000 lines including fresh produce, wines and spirits and in-store bakery. Metro store Tesco opened its first Metro in 1992, bringing the convenience of Tesco to town and city centre locations. Metros cater for thousands of busy customers each week and offer a tailored range of food lines, including ready-meals and sandwiches. Superstore Tesco began opening superstores in the 1970s and during the 1980s and 1990s built a national network, to which they are adding every year. Tesco has an ongoing programme of extending and refreshing its superstores to improve the overall experience for customers. In recent years Tesco has introduced a number of new non-food ranges into

  • Word count: 5179

Evaluate the costs and benefits for UK fashion retailers of sourcing products from India

Evaluate the costs and benefits for UK fashion retailers of sourcing products from India

Evaluate the costs and benefits for UK fashion retailers of sourcing products from India Outsourcing your company abroad involves buying in from another business inputs that were previously created in the firm. It is integral for both cutting costs and benefiting from high quality products as well as gaining from specialisation. Outsourcing part of your business opens up a world of opportunities such as the ability to maximize your revenue and minimize your expenses, the access to specialized skills and services, the prospect to concentrate more on your core business and to therefore save on money, time and infrastructure. Outsourcing to countries such as India can give you access to cost-effective services. The same services with the same level of quality are offered in India for a much lower cost! In the UK the labour cost for manufacturing clothes are extortionate due to government legislations such as the minimum wage and taxes etc, and by outsourcing to India you can help you save up to 60% of your total costs when outsourced! Outsourcing enables you gain access to high-quality services at a cost-effective price. Another benefit of outsourcing is that you can save on every aspect of your business and increase your profits. When you outsource, you can save on time, effort, infrastructure and manpower. Since you don't have to invest in infrastructure, you can also

  • Word count: 950

Cadburys Aims and Objectives

Cadburys Aims and Objectives

Welcome to Cadburys, we are a very successful business. We currently have 59,000 employees working at Cadburys. This is a small introduction into our business, the new aims and objectives we have and would like to include you with us in helping the business grow and meet its aims and their objectives. This two-page document explains our aims and objectives and how we intend to meet them. Cadburys Aims and Objectives Aims Objectives Deliver superior shareowner performance -This aim was made to help Cadburys to deliver superior return to their shareowners. This will be done by increase in business performance. Cadburys measure shareowner returns by looking at the total return on their shares, or TSR (share price growth plus the value of reinvested dividends). Delivering superior business performance. In 2008 and 2009 we are hoping to increase our sales by another 5%. Execute Fuel for Growth and focus on Free Cash Flow - Our Cash Flow for the year was £200m, down from £400m we aim to raise it to 400m again. Profitably secure and grow regional beverages share. -This aim was made for Cadburys to increase the product that they supply all over the globe so that they can increase market share. Invest, innovate and execute - In the UK, there have been a increase of the rate of innovation and our marketing spend in the second half of the year with the creation of new

  • Word count: 917

Domestic tourism is important to the UK because the more people that stay within the country to take their holidays means more money staying within the UK.

Domestic tourism is important to the UK because the more people that stay within the country to take their holidays means more money staying within the UK.

Unit 3 Assignment 4 Task 1 - P4 Domestic tourism is when people that live in the UK take a break or a holiday within in the UK. Domestic tourism is important to the UK because the more people that stay within the country to take their holidays means more money staying within the UK. According to Star UK, UK residents took 151 million domestic overnight trips in 2005 and they spent £14 billion. The £14 billion that was spent from domestic tourists meant that money stayed within the UK rather than going to other countries outside of the UK. There is a range of different domestic tourism markets, which the travel and tourism industry need to, provide for. These include: educational, families, business and couples. All of these tourism markets are looking for different needs within their holidays. Due to the recent recession more honeymoon couples are taking their honeymoons within the UK as it is cheaper than going abroad. Honeymoon couples will require different needs to general tourists, as they want to make their trip special. Honeymoon couples will be looking for a 4 or 5 star hotel to stay in. they will want to look at what facilities they have such as do they provide champagne on arrival to they have an area to relax in such as a spa and what type of meals do they provide. The location of the hotel will be important to the couple as they will need to be able to

  • Word count: 1334

How does Toyota Prius gain from Globalisation

How does Toyota Prius gain from Globalisation

Globalisation is the growth of a business to a worldwide scale. This allows them to trade anywhere in the world due to advancing technology and greater openness. This has made it easier for firms to buy their supplies from a wider range of businesses and sell their products anywhere in the world. Different governments and businesses have different views; many believe that freer trade between nations will offer prosperity and growth for all countries and businesses. The Toyota Prius is a hybrid electric car, developed and manufactured by Toyota Motor Corporation. The Prius was the first mass produced hybrid vehicle and was first sold in 1997 in Japan. It was later introduced worldwide in 2001. The Prius is sold in more than 40 countries and regions, with its largest markets being those in Japan and North America. Toyota announced in 2007 that it had sold 1 million hybrid vehicles globally, and 757,600 of those were Prius. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the 2008 Prius is the most fuel efficient car sold in the U.S. The UK department for transport also reported the Prius to be one of the least CO2 emitting vehicles on sale in the UK. The Prius has had a global effect as it has reduced CO2 emissions by 4.5 million tonnes as compared with the conventional vehicles they have replaced. Demand for the Prius in 1997 was low, because the product

  • Word count: 2730

Analysing Marketing Activities

Analysing Marketing Activities

Analysing Marketing Activities of Wimbledon Racquets and Fitness Club The marketing activities had to be improved, in order for Wimbledon Racquets and Fitness club to achieve their aims and objectives. These aims were to maximise the sales of the club and make profit. To survive and grow and most importantly improve their quality of service, therefore the club will be focusing directly on the needs and wants of their customers. The club carried out marketing activities after collecting qualitative information by running a primary research, which identifies their customer's needs that they can achieve so their members will be satisfied with the services they are providing. Market research is the systematic collection and analysis of data to enable a business to take better quality marketing decisions. The type of market research that the club conducts is mainly focus groups. This type of market research involves discussions with a selected group of individuals who answers questionnaires and fill out survey forms, to gain information about their views and experiences of a topic. The club's focus groups research was done with members of the club to record their views and opinions about the club and how it can be improved. The information that the club's focus groups collected are primary data that is categorized as qualitative information. Qualitative information cannot be

  • Word count: 3935

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How To Get An A Or A* In A-Level Business Studies

Written by Shahid Lakha, Spires Co-Founder

Securing a top grade, such as an A or A*, in A-Level Business Studies can be a key stepping stone towards a successful academic and professional career. This article aims to provide comprehensive guidance and strategies for students aiming to achieve high grades in this important subject area.

Starting from the basics, let’s delve into the world of A-Level Business Studies. This subject offers a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of the business world, equipping students with the essential knowledge and skills to analyse and comprehend various business concepts and scenarios.

Understanding A-Level Business Studies

A-Level Business Studies is a specialised course offering in-depth knowledge and insight into various aspects of business and management. From understanding business strategies and finance to learning about marketing and human resources, this subject covers a broad spectrum of crucial business-related topics.

Ready to secure an A or A* in your A-Level Business Studies? Discover the winning strategies now and turn your hard work into top grades with Spires Online Tutors!

Importance of Achieving an A or A* Grade

Attaining the top grades in A-Level Business Studies not only demonstrates a student’s strong understanding of the subject but also opens up various opportunities for further education and career prospects. A high grade in this subject is highly regarded by universities and employers, enhancing the prospects of admission to prestigious universities and securing career advancements in the business world.

Preparation for A-Level Business Studies

When preparing for A-Level Business Studies, it’s essential to incorporate effective study techniques to maximise learning and understanding of the subject matter. Students can utilise advanced study methods to enhance their comprehension and retention of the extensive business concepts covered in this course.

Take the first step towards academic excellence with Spires Online A Level Business Studies Tutors . Find a tutor for customised support and strategies for any subject or level. Your path to success starts here!

Effective Study Techniques

Students are encouraged to engage in strategic study habits, such as creating comprehensive study schedules, utilising mnemonic devices for key concepts, and actively participating in group discussions or study sessions. Employing critical thinking and analytical skills when reviewing business case studies and real-world scenarios can greatly contribute to a deeper understanding of the subject matter.

The development of a thorough revision plan is essential to A-Level business studies’ success. Effective time management, a focus on core concepts, and active participation in practice questions are essential elements of such a plan. The ability to apply theory to real-world examples, critical thinking skills, analysis skills, independent study skills, note taking skills, and exam technique are all essential aspects that can be developed through a well-structured revision plan.

A-Level Business exams require effective textbook and resource use. Students should use recommended textbooks and updated course materials. Students should also use BBC or Khan Academy video lectures and past papers online. Students can boost their A-Level business studies grades by combining these elements into a structured revision plan tailored to their needs and learning styles.

Utilising Free Exam Guides

Accessing free exam guides can be invaluable for A-Level Business Studies students, providing a wealth of resources and insights into the examination structure, formatting, and essential concepts to focus on. These guides offer comprehensive information, sample questions, and practical tips to navigate the A-Level Business Studies examination effectively.

Meeting Entry Requirements

Students aspiring to excel in A-Level Business Studies should be mindful of meeting the entry requirements for this challenging course. Focusing on strong foundational knowledge in business-related subjects, such as accounting, economics, and mathematics, can significantly enhance students’ preparedness and aptitude for the A-Level Business Studies curriculum.

Methods for Exam Success

When aiming for top grades in A-Level Business Studies, it’s essential to employ effective study methods and strategies. Creating a study schedule is a fundamental step in organising study sessions and allocating time for different topics and revisions. This approach allows students to manage their study load efficiently and ensures comprehensive coverage of the subject matter.

Strategies for Writing A-Level Business Studies Essays

Developing strong essay-writing skills is crucial for excelling in A-Level Business Studies. Students should focus on structuring their essays effectively, incorporating relevant business concepts and theories, and providing coherent and well-supported arguments. Utilising real-world examples and case studies can elevate the quality of essays, demonstrating a deep understanding of business principles and their practical applications.

Maximising Marks Using Business Case Studies

Business case studies offer valuable insight into real-world business scenarios and provide an opportunity for students to apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations. By analysing and evaluating business case studies, students can demonstrate critical thinking skills, problem-solving abilities, and a comprehensive understanding of business concepts, ultimately maximising their marks in A-Level Business Studies examinations.

Unlock your potential with Spires Online A Level Business Studies Tutors . Find a tutor now for tailor-made guidance and achieve your academic goals.

Maximising Your Performance

To achieve top grades in A-Level Business Studies, students should focus on building a solid foundation of knowledge and honing their exam preparation strategies. Ensuring comprehensive understanding of concepts through in-depth study, utilising a variety of resources for revision, and maintaining consistency in exam preparation are key factors in maximising performance and achieving academic success.

Ensuring Comprehensive Understanding of Concepts

A comprehensive understanding of business concepts is essential for excelling in A-Level Business Studies examinations. Students should dedicate ample time to thoroughly studying and comprehending the intricacies of various business theories, models, and principles, ensuring a profound grasp of the subject matter and the ability to apply it in diverse contexts.

Utilising Resources for Revision

Effective revision is essential for consolidating knowledge and preparing for A-Level Business Studies examinations. Utilising a wide range of resources, including textbooks, online materials, and study guides, allows students to gain diverse perspectives, reinforce learning, and tackle different types of exam questions, ultimately maximising their potential for success.

Past papers and mark schemes can help A-Level students identify common question types, understand the exam format, and develop their analytical skills. To simulate exams, students should time past papers. Using the exam board’s mark scheme, students should critically review their answers. This approach helps them identify areas for improvement, such as poor analysis skills or theory application to real-world examples.

Seek Support from Teachers and Tutors

Teachers and tutors can help A-Level Business Studies students learn and succeed. Teachers and tutors have a wealth of experience teaching this subject and can help students with critical thinking, effective communication skills, and clear and concise writing. When they need help, students learn more.

A-Level Business Studies also benefit from peer learning. Different perspectives and ideas from working together on assignments or discussing topics can enhance students’ learning experience. The use of textbooks and resources is also crucial. Outside of class, students should read about key concepts, theories, models, case studies, etc. Exam success requires managing exam anxiety. Before exams, students should relax with deep breathing or visualisation. Finally, independent study helps students review classroom material at their own pace and identify areas where they need help from teachers or tutors.

Don’t miss out on expert guidance to excel in A-Level Business Studies. Unlock your full potential today with Spires’ proven strategies for success!

Maintaining Consistency in Exam Preparation

Consistency in exam preparation is key to achieving high grades in A-Level Business Studies. By establishing a regular study routine, consistently revisiting and reinforcing learned material, and actively engaging in exam practice, students can enhance their confidence, competence, and readiness to excel in the examinations.

Reflecting on A-Level results and identifying areas for improvement can improve critical thinking and understanding of complex concepts. Reflect on what went well and what could be improved after receiving exam results. This helps students identify their strengths and weaknesses and set realistic academic goals.

What Are the Key Areas I Should Focus on When Studying for A-Level Business Studies?

To prepare for A-level Business Studies, students should study several key areas. These include financial management, accounting, and business structures and functions. Market research and segmentation are important. Finally, understanding the business legal environment is important. Students can strengthen their skills and knowledge in this field by mastering these fundamental concepts and topics.

Are There Any Specific Techniques for Crafting Well-Structured and Coherent Responses in A-Level Business Studies?

A-level business studies require effective writing and a solid understanding of the subject. First, analyse the question and identify key concepts, theories, and ideas to address. Reading and breaking down the question can accomplish this. After identifying key concepts, organise them logically and clearly using appropriate terminology. Case studies, examples, and relevant data can support arguments and show real-world applications. Strong responses require critical thinking and communication skills.

What Are Some Common Mistakes to Avoid When Taking A-Level Business Studies Exams?

When taking A-Level Business Studies exams, it’s important to avoid common mistakes, such as overlooking key details in case studies or misinterpreting exam questions. Misunderstanding the question and providing irrelevant information is one such mistake. Failure to structure responses coherently can lead to muddled answers. Memorisation without understanding can also lead to incorrect or incomplete answers. It’s also important to manage time during exams by giving each question enough time but not too much. Finally, not proofreading can cost marks due to spelling and grammatical errors. Avoiding these mistakes can boost a-level business studies exam scores.

How Can I Effectively Balance Studying for A-Level Business Studies With Other Academic and Extracurricular Commitments?

Juggling academics and extracurriculars is like juggling balls. It takes skill, focus, and time management to complete all tasks. For A-level Business Studies students, a well-structured study plan that accounts for sports teams, music lessons and revision, practice questions and coursework is essential. Prioritising tasks by importance reduces stress and procrastination. Communicating your schedule with teachers, peers, and family can help you balance competing demands. Finally, setting realistic goals with deadlines can help maintain academic motivation while juggling other obligations.

How Can I Get Started With A-Level Business Studies?

You can get started by downloading the Cambridge IGCSE & A-Level Business Essentials, which will guide you through using the business and understanding the key concepts of A-Level Business Studies.

What Are the Essential Qualifications Needed for A-Level Business Studies?

The essential qualifications needed for A-Level Business Studies are successful completion of IGCSEs and a good grasp of English language, as a lot of writing and reading is involved.

How Can I Contact for More Information About A-Level Business Studies?

You can contact us for any queries or information about A-Level Business Studies by visiting our website and filling out the contact form with your questions.

What Are the Benefits of Studying A-Level Business Studies?

Studying A-Level Business Studies not only helps in developing a deep understanding of how businesses work but also enhances your analytical, writing, and independent study skills.

How Can I Maximise My Success in A-Level Business Studies?

You can maximise your success in A-Level Business Studies by regularly revising, listening to business news, and following the syllabus, which aims to ensure a thorough understanding of the subject.

What Is the Significance of Cambridge IGCSE & A-Level Business Essentials in A-Level Business Studies?

The Cambridge IGCSE & A-Level Business Essentials provide interesting business stories, aid in listening to the business news, and significantly improve your grades in A-Level Business Studies.

What Are the Fees Associated With A-Level Business Studies?

The fees for A-Level Business Studies vary based on the organisation providing the qualification and the quantity of subjects you choose to study, it is best to check with the institutions directly for a guarantee.

How Can A-Level Business Studies Benefit My Future Studies at University or in My Career?

A-Level Business Studies can significantly improve your grades and provide you with a solid foundation to study the subject at university or to understand how businesses work in the real world, thus enhancing your career prospects.

Focus your studies with Spires Online A Level Business Studies Tutors . Find a tutor and start your journey to academic success today!

Author Bio:

Shahid Lakha is a distinguished Educational consultant with a robust background in Physics and a progressive career in both the independent education sector and EdTech. As a Co-Founder of Spires he has been enhancing online tutoring excellence since 2016. A dedicated private tutor since September 2011, Shahid educates students in Maths, Physics, and Engineering up to university level. He holds an MSc in Photon Science from the University of Manchester and a BSc in Physics from the University of Bath. This article was fact checked by Karol Pysniak, Spires Co-Founder

Online A Level Business Studies Tuition

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How to Write a Business Case (Template Included)

ProjectManager

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What is a business case, how to write a business case, business case template, watch our business case training video, key elements of a business case, how projectmanager helps with your business case.

A business case is a project management document that explains how the benefits of a project overweigh its costs and why it should be executed. Business cases are prepared during the project initiation phase and their purpose is to include all the project’s objectives, costs and benefits to convince stakeholders of its value.

A business case is an important project document to prove to your client, customer or stakeholder that the project proposal you’re pitching is a sound investment. Below, we illustrate the steps to writing one that will sway them.

The need for a business case is that it collects the financial appraisal, proposal, strategy and marketing plan in one document and offers a full look at how the project will benefit the organization. Once your business case is approved by the project stakeholders, you can begin the project planning phase.

Projects fail without having a solid business case to rest on, as this project document is the base for the project charter and project plan. But if a project business case is not anchored to reality, and doesn’t address a need that aligns with the larger business objectives of the organization, then it is irrelevant.

a level business case study

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Use this free Business Case Template for Word to manage your projects better.

The research you’ll need to create a strong business case is the why, what, how and who of your project. This must be clearly communicated. The elements of your business case will address the why but in greater detail. Think of the business case as a document that is created during the project initiation phase but will be used as a reference throughout the project life cycle.

Whether you’re starting a new project or mid-way through one, take time to write up a business case to justify the project expenditure by identifying the business benefits your project will deliver and that your stakeholders are most interested in reaping from the work. The following four steps will show you how to write a business case.

Step 1: Identify the Business Problem

Projects aren’t created for projects’ sake. They should always be aligned with business goals . Usually, they’re initiated to solve a specific business problem or create a business opportunity.

You should “Lead with the need.” Your first job is to figure out what that problem or opportunity is, describe it, find out where it comes from and then address the time frame needed to deal with it.

This can be a simple statement but is best articulated with some research into the economic climate and the competitive landscape to justify the timing of the project.

Step 2: Identify the Alternative Solutions

How do you know whether the project you’re undertaking is the best possible solution to the problem defined above? Naturally, prioritizing projects is hard, and the path to success is not paved with unfounded assumptions.

One way to narrow down the focus to make the right solution clear is to follow these six steps (after the relevant research, of course):

  • Note the alternative solutions.
  • For each solution, quantify its benefits.
  • Also, forecast the costs involved in each solution.
  • Then figure out its feasibility .
  • Discern the risks and issues associated with each solution.
  • Finally, document all this in your business case.

Step 3: Recommend a Preferred Solution

You’ll next need to rank the solutions, but before doing that it’s best to set up criteria, maybe have a scoring mechanism such as a decision matrix to help you prioritize the solutions to best choose the right one.

Some methodologies you can apply include:

  • Depending on the solution’s cost and benefit , give it a score of 1-10.
  • Base your score on what’s important to you.
  • Add more complexity to your ranking to cover all bases.

Regardless of your approach, once you’ve added up your numbers, the best solution to your problem will become evident. Again, you’ll want to have this process also documented in your business case.

Step 4: Describe the Implementation Approach

So, you’ve identified your business problem or opportunity and how to reach it, now you have to convince your stakeholders that you’re right and have the best way to implement a process to achieve your goals. That’s why documentation is so important; it offers a practical path to solve the core problem you identified.

Now, it’s not just an exercise to appease senior leadership. Who knows what you might uncover in the research you put into exploring the underlying problem and determining alternative solutions? You might save the organization millions with an alternate solution than the one initially proposed. When you put in the work on a strong business case, you’re able to get your sponsors or organizational leadership on board with you and have a clear vision as to how to ensure the delivery of the business benefits they expect.

Our business case template for Word is the perfect tool to start writing a business case. It has 9 key business case areas you can customize as needed. Download the template for free and follow the steps below to create a great business case for all your projects.

Free Business Case Template for Word

One of the key steps to starting a business case is to have a business case checklist. The following is a detailed outline to follow when developing your business case. You can choose which of these elements are the most relevant to your project stakeholders and add them to our business case template. Then once your business case is approved, start managing your projects with a robust project management software such as ProjectManager.

1. Executive Summary

The executive summary is a short version of each section of your business case. It’s used to give stakeholders a quick overview of your project.

2. Project Definition

This section is meant to provide general information about your projects, such as the business objectives that will be achieved and the project plan outline.

3. Vision, Goals and Objectives

First, you have to figure out what you’re trying to do and what is the problem you want to solve. You’ll need to define your project vision, goals and objectives. This will help you shape your project scope and identify project deliverables.

4. Project Scope

The project scope determines all the tasks and deliverables that will be executed in your project to reach your business objectives.

5. Background Information

Here you can provide a context for your project, explaining the problem that it’s meant to solve, and how it aligns with your organization’s vision and strategic plan.

6. Success Criteria and Stakeholder Requirements

Depending on what kind of project you’re working on, the quality requirements will differ, but they are critical to the project’s success. Collect all of them, figure out what determines if you’ve successfully met them and report on the results .

7. Project Plan

It’s time to create the project plan. Figure out the tasks you’ll have to take to get the project done. You can use a work breakdown structure template  to make sure you are through. Once you have all the tasks collected, estimate how long it will take to complete each one.

Project management software makes creating a project plan significantly easier. ProjectManager can upload your work breakdown structure template and all your tasks are populated in our tool. You can organize them according to your production cycle with our kanban board view, or use our Gantt chart view to create a project schedule.

kanban card moving into next column on the board

8. Project Budget

Your budget is an estimate of everything in your project plan and what it will cost to complete the project over the scheduled time allotted.

9. Project Schedule

Make a timeline for the project by estimating how long it will take to get each task completed. For a more impactful project schedule , use a tool to make a Gantt chart, and print it out. This will provide that extra flourish of data visualization and skill that Excel sheets lack.

10. Project Governance

Project governance refers to all the project management rules and procedures that apply to your project. For example, it defines the roles and responsibilities of the project team members and the framework for decision-making.

11. Communication Plan

Have milestones for check-ins and status updates, as well as determine how stakeholders will stay aware of the progress over the project life cycle.

12. Progress Reports

Have a plan in place to monitor and track your progress during the project to compare planned to actual progress. There are project tracking tools that can help you monitor progress and performance.

Again, using a project management tool improves your ability to see what’s happening in your project. ProjectManager has tracking tools like dashboards and status reports that give you a high-level view and more detail, respectively. Unlike light-weight apps that make you set up a dashboard, ours is embedded in the tool. Better still, our cloud-based software gives you real-time data for more insightful decision-making. Also, get reports on more than just status updates, but timesheets, workload, portfolio status and much more, all with just one click. Then filter the reports and share them with stakeholders to keep them updated.

ProjectManager’s dashboard view, which shows six key metrics on a project

13. Financial Appraisal

This is a very important section of your business case because this is where you explain how the financial benefits outweigh the project costs . Compare the financial costs and benefits of your project. You can do this by doing a sensitivity analysis and a cost-benefit analysis.

14. Market Assessment

Research your market, competitors and industry, to find opportunities and threats

15. Competitor Analysis

Identify direct and indirect competitors and do an assessment of their products, strengths, competitive advantages and their business strategy.

16. SWOT Analysis

A SWOT analysis helps you identify your organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The strengths and weaknesses are internal, while the opportunities and threats are external.

17. Marketing Strategy

Describe your product, distribution channels, pricing, target customers among other aspects of your marketing plan or strategy.

18. Risk Assessment

There are many risk categories that can impact your project. The first step to mitigating them is to identify and analyze the risks associated with your project activities.

ProjectManager , an award-winning project management software, can collect and assemble all the various data you’ll be collecting, and then easily share it both with your team and project sponsors.

Once you have a spreadsheet with all your tasks listed, you can import it into our software. Then it’s instantly populated into a Gantt chart . Simply set the duration for each of the tasks, add any dependencies, and your project is now spread across a timeline. You can set milestones, but there is so much more you can do.

Gantt chart from ProjectManager

You have a project plan now, and from the online Gantt chart, you can assign team members to tasks. Then they can comment directly on the tasks they’re working on, adding as many documents and images as needed, fostering a collaborative environment. You can track their progress and change task durations as needed by dragging and dropping the start and end dates.

But that’s only a taste of what ProjectManager offers. We have kanban boards that visualize your workflow and a real-time dashboard that tracks six project metrics for the most accurate view of your project possible.

Try ProjectManager and see for yourself with this 30-day free trial .

If you want more business case advice, take a moment to watch Jennifer Bridges, PMP, in this short training video. She explains the steps you have to take in order to write a good business case.

Here’s a screenshot for your reference.

how writing a business case for your project is good business strategy

Transcription:

Today we’re talking about how to write a business case. Well, over the past few years, we’ve seen the market, or maybe organizations, companies or even projects, move away from doing business cases. But, these days, companies, organizations, and those same projects are scrutinizing the investments and they’re really seeking a rate of return.

So now, think of the business case as your opportunity to package your project, your idea, your opportunity, and show what it means and what the benefits are and how other people can benefit.

We want to take a look today to see what’s in the business case and how to write one. I want to be clear that when you look for information on a business case, it’s not a briefcase.

Someone called the other day and they were confused because they were looking for something, and they kept pulling up briefcases. That’s not what we’re talking about today. What we’re talking about are business cases, and they include information about your strategies, about your goals. It is your business proposal. It has your business outline, your business strategy, and even your marketing plan.

Why Do You Need a Business Case?

And so, why is that so important today? Again, companies are seeking not only their project managers but their team members to have a better understanding of business and more of an idea business acumen. So this business case provides the justification for the proposed business change or plan. It outlines the allocation of capital that you may be seeking and the resources required to implement it. Then, it can be an action plan . It may just serve as a unified vision. And then it also provides the decision-makers with different options.

So let’s look more at the steps required to put these business cases together. There are four main steps. One, you want to research your market. Really look at what’s out there, where are the needs, where are the gaps that you can serve? Look at your competition. How are they approaching this, and how can you maybe provide some other alternatives?

You want to compare and finalize different approaches that you can use to go to market. Then you compile that data and you present strategies, your goals and other options to be considered.

And then you literally document it.

So what does the document look like? Well, there are templates out there today. The components vary, but these are the common ones. And then these are what I consider essential. So there’s the executive summary. This is just a summary of your company, what your management team may look like, a summary of your product and service and your market.

The business description gives a little bit more history about your company and the mission statement and really what your company is about and how this product or service fits in.

Then, you outline the details of the product or service that you’re looking to either expand or roll out or implement. You may even include in their patents may be that you have pending or other trademarks.

Then, you want to identify and lay out your marketing strategy. Like, how are you gonna take this to your customers? Are you going to have a brick-and-mortar store? Are you gonna do this online? And, what are your plans to take it to market?

You also want to include detailed information about your competitor analysis. How are they doing things? And, how are you planning on, I guess, beating your competition?

You also want to look at and identify your SWOT. And the SWOT is your strength. What are the strengths that you have in going to market? And where are the weaknesses? Maybe some of your gaps. And further, where are your opportunities and maybe threats that you need to plan for? Then the overview of the operation includes operational information like your production, even human resources, information about the day-to-day operations of your company.

And then, your financial plan includes your profit statement, your profit and loss, any of your financials, any collateral that you may have, and any kind of investments that you may be seeking.

So these are the components of your business case. This is why it’s so important. And if you need a tool that can help you manage and track this process, then sign up for our software now at ProjectManager .

Click here to browse ProjectManager's free templates

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Hertz CEO Kathryn Marinello with CFO Jamere Jackson and other members of the executive team in 2017

Top 40 Most Popular Case Studies of 2021

Two cases about Hertz claimed top spots in 2021's Top 40 Most Popular Case Studies

Two cases on the uses of debt and equity at Hertz claimed top spots in the CRDT’s (Case Research and Development Team) 2021 top 40 review of cases.

Hertz (A) took the top spot. The case details the financial structure of the rental car company through the end of 2019. Hertz (B), which ranked third in CRDT’s list, describes the company’s struggles during the early part of the COVID pandemic and its eventual need to enter Chapter 11 bankruptcy. 

The success of the Hertz cases was unprecedented for the top 40 list. Usually, cases take a number of years to gain popularity, but the Hertz cases claimed top spots in their first year of release. Hertz (A) also became the first ‘cooked’ case to top the annual review, as all of the other winners had been web-based ‘raw’ cases.

Besides introducing students to the complicated financing required to maintain an enormous fleet of cars, the Hertz cases also expanded the diversity of case protagonists. Kathyrn Marinello was the CEO of Hertz during this period and the CFO, Jamere Jackson is black.

Sandwiched between the two Hertz cases, Coffee 2016, a perennial best seller, finished second. “Glory, Glory, Man United!” a case about an English football team’s IPO made a surprise move to number four.  Cases on search fund boards, the future of malls,  Norway’s Sovereign Wealth fund, Prodigy Finance, the Mayo Clinic, and Cadbury rounded out the top ten.

Other year-end data for 2021 showed:

  • Online “raw” case usage remained steady as compared to 2020 with over 35K users from 170 countries and all 50 U.S. states interacting with 196 cases.
  • Fifty four percent of raw case users came from outside the U.S..
  • The Yale School of Management (SOM) case study directory pages received over 160K page views from 177 countries with approximately a third originating in India followed by the U.S. and the Philippines.
  • Twenty-six of the cases in the list are raw cases.
  • A third of the cases feature a woman protagonist.
  • Orders for Yale SOM case studies increased by almost 50% compared to 2020.
  • The top 40 cases were supervised by 19 different Yale SOM faculty members, several supervising multiple cases.

CRDT compiled the Top 40 list by combining data from its case store, Google Analytics, and other measures of interest and adoption.

All of this year’s Top 40 cases are available for purchase from the Yale Management Media store .

And the Top 40 cases studies of 2021 are:

1.   Hertz Global Holdings (A): Uses of Debt and Equity

2.   Coffee 2016

3.   Hertz Global Holdings (B): Uses of Debt and Equity 2020

4.   Glory, Glory Man United!

5.   Search Fund Company Boards: How CEOs Can Build Boards to Help Them Thrive

6.   The Future of Malls: Was Decline Inevitable?

7.   Strategy for Norway's Pension Fund Global

8.   Prodigy Finance

9.   Design at Mayo

10. Cadbury

11. City Hospital Emergency Room

13. Volkswagen

14. Marina Bay Sands

15. Shake Shack IPO

16. Mastercard

17. Netflix

18. Ant Financial

19. AXA: Creating the New CR Metrics

20. IBM Corporate Service Corps

21. Business Leadership in South Africa's 1994 Reforms

22. Alternative Meat Industry

23. Children's Premier

24. Khalil Tawil and Umi (A)

25. Palm Oil 2016

26. Teach For All: Designing a Global Network

27. What's Next? Search Fund Entrepreneurs Reflect on Life After Exit

28. Searching for a Search Fund Structure: A Student Takes a Tour of Various Options

30. Project Sammaan

31. Commonfund ESG

32. Polaroid

33. Connecticut Green Bank 2018: After the Raid

34. FieldFresh Foods

35. The Alibaba Group

36. 360 State Street: Real Options

37. Herman Miller

38. AgBiome

39. Nathan Cummings Foundation

40. Toyota 2010

Defining Leadership

  • Leadership is the ability to motivate, influence, direct and guide individuals or a group to achieve organisational goals.
  • It’s a pivotal aspect of management, and involves establishing a clear vision and then mobilising individuals towards achieving that vision.
  • Importantly, leadership differs from management. While management focuses on the administration and planning, leadership focuses on motivating employees and leading change.

Leadership Styles

Autocratic Leadership

  • Characterised by leaders making all key decisions without consultation.
  • Useful in circumstances where decisions need to be made quickly or when there is need for strict control.
  • However, it can demotivate employees over time as they have little input in decision-making.

Democratic Leadership

  • Involves wide consultation and team involvement in decision-making.
  • Can motivate employees by making them feel valued and involved, building a stronger team relationship.
  • However, this approach can be time-consuming and is not suitable for emergency situations or when swift decision making is required.

Laissez-faire Leadership

  • Leaders allow staff to make decisions.
  • Can foster innovation and creativity as employees are given the freedom to approach tasks in their own way.
  • However, lack of leadership supervision may result in poor performance if employees are unsure about their roles and responsibilities.

Transactional Leadership

  • Focuses on rewards and punishments to motivate employees.
  • Can be effective for output-based tasks where performance can be easily measured.
  • May fail to account for employees’ other motivational needs such as job satisfaction and personal development.

Transformational Leadership

  • Leaders inspire employees by providing a vision and encouraging them to exceed their own interests for the benefit of the group.
  • Supports employee development, creative thinking and innovation.
  • May be challenging to implement if the leader lacks charisma or if the employees are resistant to change.

Role of Leadership in an Organisation

  • Influencing behaviour : Leaders use their skills to guide the behaviour of employees towards achieving the organisation’s objectives.
  • Managing change : Implementing change, such as organisational restructuring or introducing new technology, often requires strong leadership to ensure employees understand and adapt to the changes.
  • Maintaining company culture : The values and vision the leader communicates and demonstrates can heavily influence a company’s culture.
  • Conflict resolution : It’s up to leaders to mitigate conflict within the team and ensure that it doesn’t disrupt productivity.
  • Employee development : By providing essential guidance and support, effective leaders can play a critical role in employee development and empowerment.

Qualities of Effective Leaders

  • Communication skills : Leaders must be able to clearly convey their vision, expectations and feedback.
  • Integrity : Trustworthiness and consistency in actions promote employee faith and respect in the leader.
  • Problem-solving abilities : Being able to quickly and effectively resolve issues is crucial.
  • Motivational skills : An effective leader is able to inspire and motivate their team towards achieving goals.
  • Decision-making skills : Leaders need to make informed choices swiftly and decisively, particularly during a crisis or when opportunities arise.

How to Write a Business Case: Examples, Templates, and Checklists

By Joe Weller | April 24, 2019 (updated February 26, 2023)

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This article presents expert tips on how to write a business case. We also provide a checklist to prepare for, write, and present a business case, along with free, easy-to-use Word and PowerPoint business case templates.

Included on this page, you'll find details on how to write a business case , sections to include in your business case , a business case checklist , and business case presentation examples .

What Is a Business Case?

A business case is a formal, structured document; an informal, short document; or a verbal exchange that defines the benefits of an initiative or project.

In addition, a business case forecasts the costs, benefits, and risks of an initiative, so decision makers — and even the project initiators — can decide whether a project is worthwhile and why to choose one approach over similar strategies.

Jim Maholic has over 20 years of experience with IT strategy and business case development, including two stints as a CIO, two management positions with the Big Four consulting firms, and leadership positions at several technology companies.

He describes a business case in this way: “A business case is the full story that explains the ROI for a capital project. It begins with a statement of a business problem, then explores how we can solve it or what the value of solving it is. For example, ‘Our revenues aren’t rising as fast as they should,’ or ‘Inventory isn't turning over as fast as it should,’ or ‘Costs are too high.’ That's where the business case starts.

Jim Maholic

“Then, we find out how big this problem is. We talk to people in the company and find out what they think the value of solving the problem is. All this information is packaged into a story that says, ‘Here's the problem. Here's the value of solving the problem. Here's what it costs in hardware, software, or whatever. Here are the benefits. And here’s the whole story.’”

Business Cases Explain Why You Should Invest

A business case explains why stakeholders should invest in a project. The purpose of a business case contrasts with that of a project proposal , which provides a high-level outline of what you want to initiate and its benefits to the company, or that of a project plan , which explains how you execute a project. You should create your business case during the earliest stages of project planning .

A business case can also become a key document for a project manager when planning, creating milestones, and evaluating progress.

Other names and uses for business cases are financial justification, cost-benefit analysis (CBA) , total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis , and return on investment (ROI) analysis . Nonprofits and government entities sometimes refer to business cases as case statements .

What Is Business Case Analysis (BCA)?

A business case analysis (BCA) looks not only at lowest costs, but also at technical value and other nonquantitative factors in what is known as a best-value analysis . The BCA addresses the triple constraints of time, money, and scope, and it can include measures such as performance, reliability, viability, and supportability.

Although business case analysis is used interchangeably with business case , some experts consider the analysis to be part of the business case as a whole.

What Is a Business Case Used For?

A business case helps a company or an organization prepare for new ventures or changes. This document is a crucial building block of project success and underpins the foundations of  senior-level involvement and strong planning. Business cases summarize the benefits of an endeavor, clarifying a project’s business value to help stakeholders make decisions.

A good business case should focus less on the technology, domain knowledge, or specific deliverables and more on the users of a product and the goals of a project. In the same vein, a project manager should focus not only on creating output, but also on delivering value. An initiative can offer many types of value, including contributing to strategic aims, increasing efficiency, and supporting compliance. Insufficient attention to the details of a business case and the accompanying research can lead to poor project results.

Business cases usually describe these items:

  • A business problem or opportunity
  • Possible solutions and their benefits and disadvantages (sometimes known as disbenefits )
  • Risks associated with the main solution
  • Implementation timeline
  • Consequences for implementing a solution and for retaining the status quo
  • Resources required for the initiative or project

Advantages of a Business Case

A business case may seem like just another document destined for the shelf or the shredder, but it can offer real advantages:

  • All stakeholders have similar expectations concerning the value and benefits of an initiative to an organization.
  • You can convert a business case into a project plan with milestones. You increase the chances of a project’s success with planning.
  • A business case becomes a gauge for determining whether an endeavor continues to offer value during execution and after a team produces a deliverable.
  • Project planners can more easily establish objectives and goals.
  • You can more easily discern success.
  • Teams apply the right resources more efficiently.

Who Prepares a Business Case?

You might think that business cases are the purview of financial officers and accountants. In fact, people who have direct knowledge of processes and teams should be responsible for creating these documents.

Some pundits say that the individual who advocates change must enact the change, so anyone in any role could assume the responsibilities for producing a business case. This includes consultants, line managers, or IT managers. In some organizations, the project sponsor or project manager may guide the preparation of the business case and include input from relevant departments and SMEs.

When Do You Need a Business Case?

It’s no longer enough to complete a project and present a deliverable. In an economy that often seems as unstable as it was in 2008, stakeholders want to see that a deliverable creates value and benefits for an organization. This is particularly true for complex projects or those that  require justification for enlisting external resources. Public sector projects frequently need business cases.

What's in a Business Case?

A business case outlines for a decision maker the benefits and business value of a proposed initiative. The term business case frequently refers to a written document that is submitted for review or presented at a meeting, but can also apply to an informal, spoken proposal.

What Should Be in a Business Case?

A well-written business case flows logically from presenting a problem or opportunity through the advantages and disadvantages of solutions to describing the recommended solution. When you require great detail, you can chunk text into sub-sections so that the content is easier to scan, as well as faster and less overwhelming to read. Following are the common sections of a business case in sequential order:

  • Executive summary
  • Problem statement
  • Analysis and financial details
  • Recommendation

Many organizations have pre-established templates for writing business cases. If your organization doesn’t, search online for free, easy-to-use business case templates for construction business cases, one-page business cases, and more. Depending on the narrative needs of the business case, it can contain many possible sections:

  • Preface: A preface may indicate the intended audience and any related documents.
  • Table of Contents: If your document is delivered as a PDF file, consider hyperlinking your table of contents to the appropriate sections.
  • What is the problem?
  • What do you believe is the value of solving the problem?
  • How much are you asking for?
  • When will we start seeing benefits?

     “I’ve had some presentations that don't get beyond that first page,” Maholic muses.

  • Description of the Product or Service: When proposing a new object or concept, detail what the deliverable is and how it works.
  • A Problem Statement or Mission Statement: By describing the problem or the mission of the organization, you can contextualize the proposed initiative.
  • Business Drivers for the Initiative: Indicate what benefits will contribute to the strategic aims of the organization.
  • Finance Section: Explain how much the project will cost and whether it is affordable. Detail the cash flow. Describe the expenses to execute (or not execute) the project in a cost comparison against forecasted benefits. Conduct a sensitivity analysis , a technique for determining how the different values of an independent variable affect a dependent variable.
  • Financial and nonfinancial benefits
  • Quality improvements
  • Cost savings through efficiencies
  • Added revenue
  • Competitiveness
  • Improved customer services
  • Options: What are the possible solutions to the problem? Usually, you narrow this list to 3 to 5 viable choices. Frequently, you include a “do nothing” option and a benchmark option. Some organizations require the do-nothing option; others require it only if the do-nothing option is a legitimate possibility. Quantify the benefits of each potential solution. Also, outline the risks, issues, and interdependencies for each solution.
  • What is required?
  • How is it done?
  • Who does what?
  • When will things happen?
  • Assessments or Analysis: Your analysis should list assumptions and consider cash flow and costs. Describe the risks of the project and the plans to deal with them. Also, discuss how you will leverage opportunities. Describe the context of your undertaking using PESTLE (political, economic, sociological, technological, legal, and environmental) analysis.
  • Project Approach: Detail the organization of the project, including governance and accountability, roles and responsibilities, and the schedule of progress reporting. Describe the purchasing strategy for completing the endeavor. Will you lease equipment? Rent office space? Hire contractors or employees?
  • Recommendation and Next Steps: Note the recommended solution and immediate required action.
  • Appendix: Add supporting documentation here, such as spreadsheets, charts, or drawings.

Considerations for Executive Presentations

The sections that comprise a business case may vary depending on your house style and the type of initiative. Jim Maholic says, “I package my business cases this way: I set up a one-hour meeting, so I have maybe 20 slides, but 10 to 15 slides are plenty. In reality, I might have 100 slides, but I add those in an appendix.” You may have credible supporting information, but you don’t want to bore your audience of decision makers by slogging through each slide.

“They might allocate an hour, but honestly, you're going to get their attention for 10 to 15 minutes, and then they'll start checking email and stuff,” Maholic adds. “You really have to be crisp in how you do this and know where you're going.

“Start with, ‘We have this problem,’ followed by, ‘Here are the people that we talked to who validated that this is a problem. They offered ideas about solving this problem, so we could see this substantial benefit,’” he notes.

“What matters in an executive meeting is that I answer the main questions: What is the problem? What is the cost of not solving it? What are the benefits of solving it? And when do we see the benefits? You may address additional questions later in the meeting or after the meeting, on an individual, offline basis,” Maholic says.

Business Case Templates

Using templates, you can more easily create business cases because you can focus on your research and fill in the blanks. The following free, downloadable templates are customizable for your organization’s needs.

Business Case Presentation Template

Business Case Presentation Template

You can lengthen this short PowerPoint presentation template to accommodate more detail. The business case presentation template includes spaces for describing the following elements: the project name, the executive summary, the project description, the financials, the recommended solution, the assumptions and dependencies, the options, and the benefits.

‌ Download Business Case Presentation Template - PowerPoint

Simple Business Case Template

Simple Business Case Template

A simple business case template serves a small project or a small organization. It can cover extensive details if necessary. It includes spaces for describing the following elements of the case: the title, the executive summary, the business objective, the target users, the financials and costs, the assumptions and dependencies, the implementation strategy, the required resources, and the project governance and reporting.

Download Simple Business Case Template

Word | PDF  | Smartsheet

Healthcare Business Case Template

Healthcare Business Case Template

A healthcare business case template helps you explain the current setup and how the proposed solution can create improvements. It provides space for a one-page executive summary, context for the problem or opportunity, a description of the current situation, an explanation of the proposed changes, and details of how the changes can affect your organization and any other entities.

Download Healthcare Business Case Template

Word | Google Docs

New Product Business Case Template

New Product Business Case Template

A new product business case template explores the business landscape for a new product or service. In addition to the meta information, such as the title, the author, and the executive summary, the template includes space to describe the current mission statement, the proposed product or service, the marketing strategy, an analysis of competitors, SWOT analysis , an overview of the implementation plan, and financial details.

Download New Product Business Case Template

Preparing to Write the Business Case

You can expedite your business process by understanding business case structure and using a template. In addition, having the correct perspective and following best practices can contribute to your success.

Why Are You Doing the Project?

Before you start researching and writing, understand why you want to initiate a project. The goal of a project is to solve problems. What is a problem? A problem prevents your organization from achieving its full potential. To begin, determine what problem the project is trying to solve.

Projects have deliverables, whether tangible or intangible. Think of an outcome as the result created by the deliverables. Benefits represent quantifiable improvements derived from an outcome. When a customer or team member can leverage these benefits, they become advantages.

Do Your Business Case Research

To start, review the mission statement(s) for the organization or the project. Identify the sources of data for your business case. One way to encourage the acceptance of your proposal is to discuss your rough estimates of the costs and resources with a project sponsor or customer before you embark on the business case. This helps you and the sponsor understand each other’s expectations and lessens the chance of sticker shock during the executive presentation. Then interview the people who conduct the day-to-day work and get their perspective on problems and possible solutions.

Do the Business Case Math

You must consider whether the returns justify the request. “If we're asking for $3 million, we've got to show that the project benefits far exceed that amount,” asserts Maholic. “With returns of $10, $15, or $20 million, you're going to get their attention. If you say the benefits are $300 million, they're going to think you've fallen off the truck somewhere, because that's not realistic. On the other hand, if you show benefits of $3.5 million for a cost of $3 million, that's probably not going to beat the projected return of any other project that comes across their desk.”

Consider Who the Business Case Is For

Whether the business case comes in document form or as a presentation, the project sponsor and key stakeholders will study it. Consider the key audience for each section of your document and write with that audience in mind.

The most convincing arguments for projects are those that your team can initiate and wrap up within six months, as well as produce considerable quantifiable results. Especially when big money is on the table, your proposal will compete with others from different departments. “No company has all the money it wants to invest in everything — it has to prioritize. The business case helps evaluate what the return will be for each of the projects that comes across the board's desk for approval,” explains Maholic.

Furthermore, a business case presents estimates. A business case should be built on sound research, but no one has a lock on certitude. “I think first-time business case writers in particular get caught up in building some great story. But seasoned executives get requests all the time, and they're not buffaloed by clever-sounding words or fancy spreadsheets,” Maholic cautions.

“Your ideas have to be rooted in something sensible, not just, ‘I bet we can raise revenues by 15 percent,’” he explains. Grand plans may be possible, but the key, according to Maholic, is to help decision makers understand how it is possible.

How Do You Write a Business Case?

When you have the main questions in mind and a sense of the required sections and format, you can begin to write. Consider limiting the number of authors to ensure an effective writing effort that’s consistent in style and voice. Then follow these tips:

  • Concisely cover the core content with enough detail, so stakeholders can make an informed decision.
  • Compare options, so decision makers understand the landscape.
  • Be clear, concise, and captivating.
  • Avoid jargon as much as possible.
  • Demonstrate the value of the project to the business by creating a credible and accurate argument.
  • Clearly describe the landscape for the initiative, including its dependencies. Enumerating these dependencies is crucial because contextual changes can alter the project parameters or eliminate the need for the project altogether.
  • Focus on the business and the business value rather than the knowledge domain covered by the intended project deliverable.

How Do You Know You Have Enough Detail?

You determine the length of your business cases according to the scope and complexity of your proposed endeavour. A complex project means a long business case; a small, short project means a short business case.

However, Maholic cautions against adding too much detail — conciseness can be a challenge. “You may take 4 to 6 weeks to create a business. You might talk to 50 or 100 people. There's this gnawing urge in some people to show everything they've collected in the executive presentation. Look how hard we worked. Look how smart I am . That's just awful.

“You have enough data and slides when you can answer those 4 or 5 basic questions. There may be 100 other slides, but those are supporting detail,” he says.

Common Mistakes in Writing Business Cases

You can strengthen your business case by avoiding common mistakes:

  • Forget What Your White Papers Say: Maholic finds that when salespeople create cases for customers, they frequently rely on the benefits outlined in a product’s white papers. He notes, “Saying your product cuts costs by Y percent is a great place to start, but it has to be balanced by what's in front of you regarding a particular customer.” He continues, “As a salesperson, you may say that your product can increase revenue by 5 percent. That may be true for past customers, but this particular customer may have three straight years of declining revenues. It's silly to say that a product is going to both arrest a decline and bump up revenue by 5 percent. You have to think things through. That’s the analysis part. You can't just mouth off.”
  • Spreadsheets Are not the Main Show: "Too often, I think, people hear business case , and they jump right to building a spreadsheet,” Maholic says. “They're eager to build the mother of all spreadsheets and show how smart they are by demonstrating the mother of all spreadsheets. While certainly spreadsheets are necessary to show the math, the spreadsheet is only a small part of the solution. Spreadsheets don't really articulate the problem or indicate who you talked to or what you analyzed to get to that solution,” he adds.
  • Arguments Do not Equal More Money: Sometimes, people believe that a strong case justifies a more generous price tag. Not so, says Maholic: “As a decision maker, having a better business case doesn't mean I'm going to roll over and say, ‘Sure, you can charge me an extra million dollars.’ A good business case means the project has the value to go forward. Now, we're going to start negotiating and I'm still going to work to get the best price I can. People who've done business cases before know that. But people who are new to them don't completely understand that.”
  • Remember That It’s About Value, Not About Toys: For startups, the coolness factor of the technology or product may carry some weight, but for most organizations, a business case must focus on the business value without getting lost in the domain knowledge and technical details. Maholic explains: “Nobody at the executive level cares what the throughput ratio is of this process or that stack. What they want to know is, ‘Do I get revenue more quickly? Do I cut costs more deeply? Tell me what the value of doing X is, and then you can go off and buy whatever toys you want to in order to do X.’”

Steps to Produce a Business Case

Your organization may have a tribal understanding of the best process for creating a business case. Some employees may advocate for following the Ds , which refer to the steps to produce a business case. The Ds can include as many as six steps, but generally focus on these four:

  • Discover your problem or opportunity.
  • Design your solutions and alternatives.
  • Develop the details that describe the pros and cons of each potential solution.
  • Deploy the business case.

Some advocates add the Define step to the beginning of the process and the Deliver step to the end. For best results, create your business case in the following order:

  • Determine your problem or opportunity.
  • Research the context for your proposal as appropriate: When developing a new product, your research may focus on the market; when acquiring new training or software, you may review current internal processes; and when making a new purchase, you may interview dozens of team members who use current tools and procedures.
  • Compare alternative approaches and recommend the most appropriate strategy.
  • Gather supporting data and evidence for the recommended approach.
  • Write the business case.
  • Write the executive summary.
  • Edit your business case draft.
  • Present your business case to either the final authority or the personnel who will be instrumental in implementing the case plan.

‌ Download Business Case Process Checklist  

The Business Case in Project Development

Contrary to what you might imagine, the business case can be a living document. Starting with the review process, stakeholders may reject, cancel, postpone, accept, or adjust the business case. To some extent, the business case becomes the guidebook for your initiative. Stakeholders and the project manager should refer to the business case throughout the lifecycle of the project to ensure that efforts (and intentions) remain on track.

What Are the Features of a Project Business Case?

A well-considered business case offers the following characteristics: an easy-to-understand description of the business value of the initiative and the immediate benefits of the project, including details of the positive impact on organizational strategy.

How Do You Analyze a Business Case?

In university-level business schools, business case studies (or case studies) function as teaching tools to help students use their analytic skills. Case studies describe a company and how it employs a solution. Following is the suggested approach for students analyzing a case:

  • Review the case in detail. Identify the key issues.
  • Determine 2 to 5 essential problems.
  • Look for solutions to those problems.
  • Describe your recommended solution.

What Is a Full Business Case?

A business case is a structured, detailed document that presents the justification for the commitment of financial and other resources to an endeavor. Business cases help you gain the support of management and other stakeholders, as well as approval for projects and programs.

What Is a Business Case in Project Management?

An approved business case can have a long life. Although the project sponsor ultimately owns the business case, it is the project manager who uses the business case as the guidebook for expectations and dependencies. In addition, the business case becomes an important document in an organization’s project portfolio management process. During this process, a company balances its resources with its strategic objectives to determine the livelihood of all the projects it undertakes.

History and Origins of Business Cases

The formal business case has its roots in 19th-century Europe, particularly with the work of French-Italian engineer-economist Jules Dupuit. His contribution included statistical tools to identify, measure, and value the benefits beyond merely determining the lowest bidder. Specifically, Dupuit is credited with inventing what he called the benefit-cost analysis . Today, professionals recognize the value of business cases outside of public works and government. Both nonprofit and for-profit organizations regularly use business cases.

Resources and Examples for Creating Your Business Case

If you’re new to business cases, you don’t have to start empty-handed. We offer resources to help you begin writing. Please see the following examples and templates:

  • Here’s an example of a business case in a classic document format . This particular business case argues against a capital investment.
  • This example presents three business cases for one higher education department . The  presentation comes in a slide format.
  • In this article, Jim Maholic offers a template for creating your business case .

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CLOTHING RETAIL CASE STUDY asos A-Level Business edexcel 2024

CLOTHING RETAIL CASE STUDY asos A-Level Business edexcel 2024

Subject: Business and finance

Age range: 16+

Resource type: Worksheet/Activity

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Last updated

8 January 2024

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a level business case study

The topic for A-level business Edexcel paper 3 in June 2024 will be clothing retail and manufacturing industries.

This resource along with others similar will be great practice for students to gain knowledge of the market and be best prepared for the A-level paper 3.

Clothing retail and the manufacturing industry is a wide scope and offers lots to talk about. from the move to online shopping and the decline of the high-street to production methods and ethics.

This resource is about the rise of asos and their marketing methods.

At the end of the extract there are practice question students can attempt in order for them to build the skills required for the A-level exams.

A-Level business studies is a great subject to introduce students to the world of economics and how to run a business. It builds the foundations of important skills such as financial planning, data reading and interpreting and much more

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CLOTHING RETAIL FULL REVISION A-level Business Edexcel 2024

The topic for A-level business Edexcel paper 3 in June 2024 will be clothing retail and manufacturing industries. This resource along with others similar will be great practice for students to gain knowledge of the market and be best prepared for the A-level paper 3. Clothing retail and the manufacturing industry is a wide scope and offers lots to talk about. from the move to online shopping and the decline of the high-street to production methods and ethics. This bundle includes: a full 2 hour Edexcel style practice exam paper. 100 marks ( 8, 10, 12, 20, 8, 10, 12, 20) x5 case studies (ASOS, Shein, primark, GymShark, adidas) A full edexcel style guided mark scheme is included for the practice paper. A-Level business studies is a great subject to introduce students to the world of economics and how to run a business. It builds the foundations of important skills such as financial planning, data reading and interpreting and much more Who are Phillips Resources? At Phillips Resources we use your feedback to create the highest quality and most desired resources so that students can get the grades they desire and teachers are trusting in the resources they use and also are left stress free from not having to create their own resources as often. sign up to our free newsletter at: https://phillipsresources.co.uk/pages/subscribe-for-free

x5 Clothing retail CASE STUDIES for paper 3 2024 Edexcel

The topic for A-level business Edexcel paper 3 in June 2024 will be clothing retail and manufacturing industries. These resources along with others similar will be great practice for students to gain knowledge of the market and be best prepared for the A-level paper 3. Clothing retail and the manufacturing industry is a wide scope and offers lots to talk about. from the move to online shopping and the decline of the high-street to production methods and ethics. Within the bundle are 5 case studies (ASOS. Shein, Primark, GymShark, Adidas) each one is an overview of the company highlighting factors relevant the the edexcel specification. Production methods Marketing methods Entrepreneurs Brand image Ethical Considerations Pricing strategies Mission statements + more At the end of the extract there are practice question students can attempt in order for them to build the skills required for the A-level exams. A-Level business studies is a great subject to introduce students to the world of economics and how to run a business. It builds the foundations of important skills such as financial planning, data reading and interpreting and much more Who are Phillips Resources? At Phillips Resources we use your feedback to create the highest quality and most desired resources so that students can get the grades they desire and teachers are trusting in the resources they use and also are left stress free from not having to create their own resources as often.

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OCR A-Level Business Past Papers

We have worked hard to compile every OCR A-Level Business past paper by topic and exam board! So if you’re revising for OCR A-Level Business, you can find all of the questions that have been ever asked by OCR in one single document - useful, no?

June 2022 OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431)

  • 2022 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2022 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2022 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme

November 2021 OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431)

  • 2021 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2021 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2021 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme

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November 2020 OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431)

  • 2020 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2020 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2020 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2020 | AS Business Studies: The local business environment – H031/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2020 | AS Business Studies: The Wider business enviroment – H031/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme

June 2019 OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431)

  • 2019 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2019 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2019 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2019 | AS Business Studies: The local business environment – H031/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2019 | AS Business Studies: The Wider business enviroment – H031/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme

June 2018 OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431)

  • 2018 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2018 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2018 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2018 | AS Business Studies: The local business environment – H031/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2018 | AS Business Studies: The Wider business enviroment – H031/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme

OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431) - OCR A-Level Business Studies June 2017

  • 2017 | A-Level Business Studies: Operating in a local business environment – H431/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2017 | A-Level Business Studies: The UK business enviroment – H431/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2017 | A-Level Business Studies: The Global business environment – H431/03 Question Paper Mark Scheme

OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H031, H431) - OCR A-Level Business Studies June 2016

  • 2016 | AS Business Studies: The local business environment – H031/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | AS Business Studies: The Wider business enviroment – H031/02 Question Paper Mark Scheme

OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H030, H430) - OCR A-Level Business Studies June 2016

  • 2016 | AS Business Studies: An Introduction to Business – F291/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | AS Business Studies: Business Functions – F292/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | A2 Business Studies: Marketing– F293/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | A2 Business Studies: Accounting – F294/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | A2 Business Studies: People in Organisations – F295/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | A2 Business Studies: Business Production – F296/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2016 | A2 Business Studies: Strategic Management – F297/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme

OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H030, H430) - OCR A-Level Business Studies June 2015

  • 2015 | AS Business Studies: An Introduction to Business – F291/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | AS Business Studies: Business Functions – F292/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | A2 Business Studies: Marketing– F293/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | A2 Business Studies: Accounting – F294/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | A2 Business Studies: People in Organisations – F295/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | A2 Business Studies: Business Production – F296/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2015 | A2 Business Studies: Strategic Management – F297/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme

a level business case study

OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers (H030, H430) - OCR A-Level Business Studies June 2014

  • 2014 | AS Business Studies: An Introduction to Business – F291/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | AS Business Studies: Business Functions – F292/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | A2 Business Studies: Marketing– F293/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | A2 Business Studies: Accounting – F294/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | A2 Business Studies: People in Organisations – F295/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | A2 Business Studies: Business Production – F296/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme
  • 2014 | A2 Business Studies: Strategic Management – F297/01 Question Paper Mark Scheme

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➨what is ocr a-level business studies.

OCR A-Level Business Studies is an advanced level qualification in business studies offered by OCR, a leading UK-based exam board. The course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and practices of business, and is typically taken by students aged 16-18.

➨What topics are covered in OCR A-Level Business Studies?

The OCR A-Level Business Studies course covers a wide range of topics, including marketing, accounting, finance, operations management, and business strategy. Students will also explore key business theories, such as supply and demand, market structures, and the impact of globalization.

➨How is OCR A-Level Business Studies assessed?

OCR A-Level Business Studies is assessed through a combination of exams and coursework. The exams are typically taken at the end of the two-year course and will test students' knowledge and understanding of the key topics covered. Coursework may take the form of essays, presentations, case studies, or practical tasks.

➨What can I do with an OCR A-Level Business Studies qualification?

An OCR A-Level Business Studies qualification can open up a range of career opportunities, including roles in marketing, finance, management, and human resources. It can also provide a strong foundation for further study in related fields, such as business management, economics, and accounting.

➨How can I prepare for OCR A-Level Business Studies exams?

To prepare for OCR A-Level Business Studies exams, it is recommended that students create a study plan and revise regularly. They should also practice past exam papers to familiarize themselves with the format and types of questions that may be asked. Additionally, attending revision sessions and seeking support from teachers and peers can be helpful.

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a level business case study

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Profit sharing partnership in beef cattle fattening business (case study at nusa fauna company).

The purpose of this study was to analyze 1) the application of technical aspects at Nusa Fauna Cattle Farming business, 2) the income level of beef cattle farmers with a profit-sharing system between capital owners and farmers, and their contribution to the total income of the Nusa Fauna Cattle Farm business, and 3) the effectiveness of the partnership at Nusa Fauna cattle farming business. The current research was carried out through observation and interviews with the research respondents, including 11 farmers who were partner members of the Nusa Fauna Cattle Farming Business. In this case, samples were obtained through a deliberate sampling technique. Furthermore, research data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive methods, particularly the Pearson correlation test. The results showed that the application of technical aspects was classified as moderate, obtaining a score of 66.15% based on the technical guidelines issued by the Directorate General of Livestock (1992).

Furthermore, the contribution of income from the livestock business was 22.58% smaller than the primary income of farmers, which was 77.42%, indicating that the business was classified as a side business. In addition, based on the Pearson correlation test that has been conducted, the partnership implemented in the business has been effective. In this case, the variables that had a positive effect on increasing revenue sequentially are facility support, level of education, livestock experience, attitudes towards partnerships, technical aspects, technological support, and age of the cattle farmers. Meanwhile, income and cosmopolitan variables had a negative and insignificant effect.

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    a level business case study

  3. How to Write a Business Case Study: Tips, Steps, Mistakes

    a level business case study

  4. 12+ Case Study Examples

    a level business case study

  5. 15+ Professional Case Study Examples [Design Tips + Templates]

    a level business case study

  6. 31+ Case Study Samples

    a level business case study

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  4. Business Studies Ch.1 Q.27 to 60

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  6. How China Got Rich? Business Case Study

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Cambridge International AS & A Level

    Cambridge International AS & A Level BUSINESS 9609/32 Paper 3 Case Study October/November 2020 INSERT 3 hours INFORMATION This insert contains the case study. You may annotate this insert and use the blank spaces for planning. Do not write your answers on the insert. This document has 8 pages. Blank pages are indicated. DC (LK) 191922/3

  2. Case Studies And Analysis

    AS and A Level: Case Studies and Analysis Home … Case Studies and Analysis Relevance 516 results found Business Economics Reasons fuel prices is increased rapidly? * Because of the hurricane Katrina devastation which destroyed nine (9) oil refineries in the US Gulf Cost of Mexico which has resulted in less oil being refined.

  3. In the News

    Collections In the News - A-Level Business Last updated 18 Dec 2023 Here is a growing collection of topical case studies, complete with worksheet and suggested answers, for A-Level Business McDonald's CosMc Launch: A-Level Business in the News 18th December 2023 Increased price of branded goods affecting shoppers: A-Level Business in the News

  4. Business

    Here's a case study-based activity for A-Level Business students to help them consider the issue of resistance to change and how change can be managed. Read more Essential Teaching Resources for GCSE and A-Level Business for 2023/24

  5. Cambridge International AS and A Level case studies

    Find out how Cambridge learners achieve success with Cambridge International AS and A Level. Read a case study. Skip to main content. ... Business Studies - 0450 Syllabus overview; Past papers, examiner reports and specimen papers ; Published resources; Business Studies (9-1) - 0986 ...

  6. A-Level Business Edexcel CASE STUDIES

    10 case studies for the A-Level business Edexcel specification These 10 case studies cover a wide range of topics including global marketing, motivation, branding, profit, production, CSR, entrepreneurs, trading blocs, market research, sources of finance, and more

  7. A range of Business case studies than can be used for A Level business

    A range of Business case studies than can be used for A Level business. | Teaching Resources A range of Business case studies than can be used for A Level business. Subject: Business and finance Age range: 16+ Resource type: Worksheet/Activity File previews docx, 89.77 KB docx, 28.35 KB docx, 41.75 KB docx, 138.57 KB docx, 19.3 KB

  8. Business AS Paper 2 Case Study

    https://caiebusiness.com/past-paper-solutions-as-paper2/Step by step guide of how to answer Business AS Paper 2 Case Study questions.1:40 How to read and ana...

  9. Practice Mini Case Study for AQA A-Level Business Paper 2

    Here is a practice case study with some 9 analysis and 16 mark "open" questions for student preparing for AQA A-Level Business Paper 2. The case study is on Brompton Bicycle Limited (which we've also featured in one of our full Paper 3 Mock Exam Papers ). DOWNLOAD THE BROMPTON PRACTICE CASE STUDY HERE (PDF) EXAM QUESTIONS TO TRY

  10. Business Case Studies : AS and A Level

    Longman, 2002 - Business - 318 pages. Motivates students through a wide range of case studies based on popular and core issues that focus on key teaching points.Over 100 Case Studies including Nokia and Sony Playstation.Case Studies increase in difficulty to cater for all abilities, with practice synoptic exercises in the latter part of the book.

  11. 7 Favorite Business Case Studies to Teach—and Why

    ROB AUSTINProfessor, Ivey Business School. "This might seem like an odd choice, but my favorite case to teach is an old operations case called Fabritek 1992. The latest version of Fabritek 1992 is dated 2009, but it is my understanding that this is a rewrite of a case that is older (probably much older). There is a Fabritek 1969 in the HBP ...

  12. How To Get An A Or A* In A-Level Business Studies

    When taking A-Level Business Studies exams, it's important to avoid common mistakes, such as overlooking key details in case studies or misinterpreting exam questions. Misunderstanding the question and providing irrelevant information is one such mistake.

  13. Edexcel A-Level Business Studies Past Papers

    Edexcel A-Level Business Studies is assessed through a combination of exams and coursework. The exams are typically taken at the end of the two-year course and will test students' knowledge and understanding of the key topics covered. Coursework may take the form of essays, presentations, case studies, or practical tasks.

  14. PDF A-level Business

    A-level Business Ian Marcousé ... progression pathway and case studies that illustrate core points. AQA Business for AS Ian Marcousé, Andy Hammond, Nigel Watson 9781471835803 Mar-15 £24.99 AQA Business for A-level Ian Marcousé, Andy Hammond, Nigel Watson 9781471835698 Sep-15 £34.99

  15. How to Write a Business Case (Template Included)

    Step 1: Identify the Business Problem Projects aren't created for projects' sake. They should always be aligned with business goals. Usually, they're initiated to solve a specific business problem or create a business opportunity. You should "Lead with the need."

  16. Top 40 Most Popular Case Studies of 2021

    Orders for Yale SOM case studies increased by almost 50% compared to 2020. The top 40 cases were supervised by 19 different Yale SOM faculty members, several supervising multiple cases. CRDT compiled the Top 40 list by combining data from its case store, Google Analytics, and other measures of interest and adoption.

  17. Leadership

    Defining Leadership. Leadership is the ability to motivate, influence, direct and guide individuals or a group to achieve organisational goals. It's a pivotal aspect of management, and involves establishing a clear vision and then mobilising individuals towards achieving that vision. Importantly, leadership differs from management.

  18. Edexcel A Level Business (Year 2) Topic Worksheets and Case Studies

    Jim Riley. 7th September 2016. Our Edexcel A Level Business teaching team have completed their superb, comprehensive suite of lesson worksheets and cases for the Year 2 teaching content of Edexcel A Level Business. This resource really is an essential part of every well-prepared departments preparations for Theme 3 and Theme 4.

  19. How to Write a Business Case

    In university-level business schools, business case studies (or case studies) function as teaching tools to help students use their analytic skills. Case studies describe a company and how it employs a solution. Following is the suggested approach for students analyzing a case: Review the case in detail. Identify the key issues.

  20. CLOTHING RETAIL CASE STUDY asos A-Level Business edexcel 2024

    The topic for A-level business Edexcel paper 3 in June 2024 will be clothing retail and manufacturing industries. These resources along with others similar will be great practice for students to gain knowledge of the market and be best prepared for the A-level paper 3. Clothing retail and the manufacturing industry is a wide scope and offers ...

  21. AS and A Level Business

    The A Level Business course encourages learners to: Develop an enthusiasm for studying business. Gain an holistic understanding of business in a range of contexts. Develop a critical understanding of organisations and their ability to meet society's needs and wants. Understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives.

  22. OCR A-Level Business Studies Past Papers

    "Prepare for success in the OCR A-Level Business Studies exam with our comprehensive resources, including past papers, revision guides, and online courses. Our expertly crafted materials cover all key topics in business studies, from marketing and finance to operations and human resources. Develop your critical thinking and analytical skills, and gain the knowledge and confidence needed to ...

  23. Latest update for BTEC Business teachers

    As assignments provide a final assessment, they will draw on the specified range of teaching content for the learning aims. The specified content is compulsory. The evidence for assessment need not cover every aspect of the teaching content as learners will normally be given particular examples, case studies or contexts in their assignments.

  24. Free courses and qualification for adults to boost their skills

    Free courses include: Skills Bootcamps: Free, flexible courses of up to 16 weeks which help you develop new skills that employers are looking for, available in areas from digital to health and social care. Free Courses For Jobs: The government might pay for you to take a course that helps you learn new skills or apply for work.

  25. Practice Mini Case Study for AQA A-Level Business Paper 2

    2nd March 2020 Here is a practice case study with some 9 analysis and 16 mark "open" questions for student preparing for AQA A-Level Business Paper 2. The case study is on ITV plc. There is no formal mark scheme for these questions.

  26. Planning for A Successful Robotic Process Automation (Rpa) Project and

    In today's fast-paced business world, automation is essential for companies to remain competitive. The use of Robotic Process Automation (RPA) has proven to be a game-changer for many organizations, including multinational consumer retail companies. However, implementing RPA at an enterprise-wide scale can be a daunting task. In this real life case study, we take a deep dive into the process ...

  27. Practice Exam Questions

    Practice Mini Case Study for AQA A-Level Business Paper 2 - Brompton Bicycle Limited Practice Exam Questions. Test 15 The Edge in AQA A Level Business - Paper 1 MCQ Blast for 2019 Practice Exam Questions. Edexcel A Level Business - MCQ Revision Blast Test 4: All Themes ...

  28. Profit Sharing Partnership in Beef Cattle Fattening Business (Case

    The purpose of this study was to analyze 1) the application of technical aspects at Nusa Fauna Cattle Farming business, 2) the income level of beef cattle farmers with a profit-sharing system between capital owners and farmers, and their contribution to the total income of the Nusa Fauna Cattle Farm business, and 3) the effectiveness of the partnership...