Developing a Thesis Statement

Many papers you write require developing a thesis statement. In this section you’ll learn what a thesis statement is and how to write one.

Keep in mind that not all papers require thesis statements . If in doubt, please consult your instructor for assistance.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement . . .

  • Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic.
  • Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper.
  • Is focused and specific enough to be “proven” within the boundaries of your paper.
  • Is generally located near the end of the introduction ; sometimes, in a long paper, the thesis will be expressed in several sentences or in an entire paragraph.
  • Identifies the relationships between the pieces of evidence that you are using to support your argument.

Not all papers require thesis statements! Ask your instructor if you’re in doubt whether you need one.

Identify a topic

Your topic is the subject about which you will write. Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic; or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper.

Consider what your assignment asks you to do

Inform yourself about your topic, focus on one aspect of your topic, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts, generate a topic from an assignment.

Below are some possible topics based on sample assignments.

Sample assignment 1

Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II.

Identified topic

Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis

This topic avoids generalities such as “Spain” and “World War II,” addressing instead on Franco’s role (a specific aspect of “Spain”) and the diplomatic relations between the Allies and Axis (a specific aspect of World War II).

Sample assignment 2

Analyze one of Homer’s epic similes in the Iliad.

The relationship between the portrayal of warfare and the epic simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64.

This topic focuses on a single simile and relates it to a single aspect of the Iliad ( warfare being a major theme in that work).

Developing a Thesis Statement–Additional information

Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic, or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper. You’ll want to read your assignment carefully, looking for key terms that you can use to focus your topic.

Sample assignment: Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II Key terms: analyze, Spain’s neutrality, World War II

After you’ve identified the key words in your topic, the next step is to read about them in several sources, or generate as much information as possible through an analysis of your topic. Obviously, the more material or knowledge you have, the more possibilities will be available for a strong argument. For the sample assignment above, you’ll want to look at books and articles on World War II in general, and Spain’s neutrality in particular.

As you consider your options, you must decide to focus on one aspect of your topic. This means that you cannot include everything you’ve learned about your topic, nor should you go off in several directions. If you end up covering too many different aspects of a topic, your paper will sprawl and be unconvincing in its argument, and it most likely will not fulfull the assignment requirements.

For the sample assignment above, both Spain’s neutrality and World War II are topics far too broad to explore in a paper. You may instead decide to focus on Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis , which narrows down what aspects of Spain’s neutrality and World War II you want to discuss, as well as establishes a specific link between those two aspects.

Before you go too far, however, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts. Try to avoid topics that already have too much written about them (i.e., “eating disorders and body image among adolescent women”) or that simply are not important (i.e. “why I like ice cream”). These topics may lead to a thesis that is either dry fact or a weird claim that cannot be supported. A good thesis falls somewhere between the two extremes. To arrive at this point, ask yourself what is new, interesting, contestable, or controversial about your topic.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times . Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Derive a main point from topic

Once you have a topic, you will have to decide what the main point of your paper will be. This point, the “controlling idea,” becomes the core of your argument (thesis statement) and it is the unifying idea to which you will relate all your sub-theses. You can then turn this “controlling idea” into a purpose statement about what you intend to do in your paper.

Look for patterns in your evidence

Compose a purpose statement.

Consult the examples below for suggestions on how to look for patterns in your evidence and construct a purpose statement.

  • Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis
  • Franco turned to the Allies when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from the Axis

Possible conclusion:

Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: Franco’s desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power.

Purpose statement

This paper will analyze Franco’s diplomacy during World War II to see how it contributed to Spain’s neutrality.
  • The simile compares Simoisius to a tree, which is a peaceful, natural image.
  • The tree in the simile is chopped down to make wheels for a chariot, which is an object used in warfare.

At first, the simile seems to take the reader away from the world of warfare, but we end up back in that world by the end.

This paper will analyze the way the simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64 moves in and out of the world of warfare.

Derive purpose statement from topic

To find out what your “controlling idea” is, you have to examine and evaluate your evidence . As you consider your evidence, you may notice patterns emerging, data repeated in more than one source, or facts that favor one view more than another. These patterns or data may then lead you to some conclusions about your topic and suggest that you can successfully argue for one idea better than another.

For instance, you might find out that Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis, but when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from them, he turned to the Allies. As you read more about Franco’s decisions, you may conclude that Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: his desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power. Based on this conclusion, you can then write a trial thesis statement to help you decide what material belongs in your paper.

Sometimes you won’t be able to find a focus or identify your “spin” or specific argument immediately. Like some writers, you might begin with a purpose statement just to get yourself going. A purpose statement is one or more sentences that announce your topic and indicate the structure of the paper but do not state the conclusions you have drawn . Thus, you might begin with something like this:

  • This paper will look at modern language to see if it reflects male dominance or female oppression.
  • I plan to analyze anger and derision in offensive language to see if they represent a challenge of society’s authority.

At some point, you can turn a purpose statement into a thesis statement. As you think and write about your topic, you can restrict, clarify, and refine your argument, crafting your thesis statement to reflect your thinking.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Compose a draft thesis statement

If you are writing a paper that will have an argumentative thesis and are having trouble getting started, the techniques in the table below may help you develop a temporary or “working” thesis statement.

Begin with a purpose statement that you will later turn into a thesis statement.

Assignment: Discuss the history of the Reform Party and explain its influence on the 1990 presidential and Congressional election.

Purpose Statement: This paper briefly sketches the history of the grassroots, conservative, Perot-led Reform Party and analyzes how it influenced the economic and social ideologies of the two mainstream parties.

Question-to-Assertion

If your assignment asks a specific question(s), turn the question(s) into an assertion and give reasons why it is true or reasons for your opinion.

Assignment : What do Aylmer and Rappaccini have to be proud of? Why aren’t they satisfied with these things? How does pride, as demonstrated in “The Birthmark” and “Rappaccini’s Daughter,” lead to unexpected problems?

Beginning thesis statement: Alymer and Rappaccinni are proud of their great knowledge; however, they are also very greedy and are driven to use their knowledge to alter some aspect of nature as a test of their ability. Evil results when they try to “play God.”

Write a sentence that summarizes the main idea of the essay you plan to write.

Main idea: The reason some toys succeed in the market is that they appeal to the consumers’ sense of the ridiculous and their basic desire to laugh at themselves.

Make a list of the ideas that you want to include; consider the ideas and try to group them.

  • nature = peaceful
  • war matériel = violent (competes with 1?)
  • need for time and space to mourn the dead
  • war is inescapable (competes with 3?)

Use a formula to arrive at a working thesis statement (you will revise this later).

  • although most readers of _______ have argued that _______, closer examination shows that _______.
  • _______ uses _______ and _____ to prove that ________.
  • phenomenon x is a result of the combination of __________, __________, and _________.

What to keep in mind as you draft an initial thesis statement

Beginning statements obtained through the methods illustrated above can serve as a framework for planning or drafting your paper, but remember they’re not yet the specific, argumentative thesis you want for the final version of your paper. In fact, in its first stages, a thesis statement usually is ill-formed or rough and serves only as a planning tool.

As you write, you may discover evidence that does not fit your temporary or “working” thesis. Or you may reach deeper insights about your topic as you do more research, and you will find that your thesis statement has to be more complicated to match the evidence that you want to use.

You must be willing to reject or omit some evidence in order to keep your paper cohesive and your reader focused. Or you may have to revise your thesis to match the evidence and insights that you want to discuss. Read your draft carefully, noting the conclusions you have drawn and the major ideas which support or prove those conclusions. These will be the elements of your final thesis statement.

Sometimes you will not be able to identify these elements in your early drafts, but as you consider how your argument is developing and how your evidence supports your main idea, ask yourself, “ What is the main point that I want to prove/discuss? ” and “ How will I convince the reader that this is true? ” When you can answer these questions, then you can begin to refine the thesis statement.

Refine and polish the thesis statement

To get to your final thesis, you’ll need to refine your draft thesis so that it’s specific and arguable.

  • Ask if your draft thesis addresses the assignment
  • Question each part of your draft thesis
  • Clarify vague phrases and assertions
  • Investigate alternatives to your draft thesis

Consult the example below for suggestions on how to refine your draft thesis statement.

Sample Assignment

Choose an activity and define it as a symbol of American culture. Your essay should cause the reader to think critically about the society which produces and enjoys that activity.

  • Ask The phenomenon of drive-in facilities is an interesting symbol of american culture, and these facilities demonstrate significant characteristics of our society.This statement does not fulfill the assignment because it does not require the reader to think critically about society.
Drive-ins are an interesting symbol of American culture because they represent Americans’ significant creativity and business ingenuity.
Among the types of drive-in facilities familiar during the twentieth century, drive-in movie theaters best represent American creativity, not merely because they were the forerunner of later drive-ins and drive-throughs, but because of their impact on our culture: they changed our relationship to the automobile, changed the way people experienced movies, and changed movie-going into a family activity.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast-food establishments, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize America’s economic ingenuity, they also have affected our personal standards.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast- food restaurants, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize (1) Americans’ business ingenuity, they also have contributed (2) to an increasing homogenization of our culture, (3) a willingness to depersonalize relationships with others, and (4) a tendency to sacrifice quality for convenience.

This statement is now specific and fulfills all parts of the assignment. This version, like any good thesis, is not self-evident; its points, 1-4, will have to be proven with evidence in the body of the paper. The numbers in this statement indicate the order in which the points will be presented. Depending on the length of the paper, there could be one paragraph for each numbered item or there could be blocks of paragraph for even pages for each one.

Complete the final thesis statement

The bottom line.

As you move through the process of crafting a thesis, you’ll need to remember four things:

  • Context matters! Think about your course materials and lectures. Try to relate your thesis to the ideas your instructor is discussing.
  • As you go through the process described in this section, always keep your assignment in mind . You will be more successful when your thesis (and paper) responds to the assignment than if it argues a semi-related idea.
  • Your thesis statement should be precise, focused, and contestable ; it should predict the sub-theses or blocks of information that you will use to prove your argument.
  • Make sure that you keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Change your thesis as your paper evolves, because you do not want your thesis to promise more than your paper actually delivers.

In the beginning, the thesis statement was a tool to help you sharpen your focus, limit material and establish the paper’s purpose. When your paper is finished, however, the thesis statement becomes a tool for your reader. It tells the reader what you have learned about your topic and what evidence led you to your conclusion. It keeps the reader on track–well able to understand and appreciate your argument.

thesis example in sentence

Writing Process and Structure

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Getting Started with Your Paper

Interpreting Writing Assignments from Your Courses

Generating Ideas for

Creating an Argument

Thesis vs. Purpose Statements

Architecture of Arguments

Working with Sources

Quoting and Paraphrasing Sources

Using Literary Quotations

Citing Sources in Your Paper

Drafting Your Paper

Generating Ideas for Your Paper

Introductions

Paragraphing

Developing Strategic Transitions

Conclusions

Revising Your Paper

Peer Reviews

Reverse Outlines

Revising an Argumentative Paper

Revision Strategies for Longer Projects

Finishing Your Paper

Twelve Common Errors: An Editing Checklist

How to Proofread your Paper

Writing Collaboratively

Collaborative and Group Writing

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thesis Statements

What this handout is about.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Introduction

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence near the beginning of your paper (most often, at the end of the first paragraph) that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. (Check out our handout on understanding assignments for more information.)

How do I create a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis” that presents a basic or main idea and an argument that you think you can support with evidence. Both the argument and your thesis are likely to need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement. For more ideas on how to get started, see our handout on brainstorming .

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis, ask yourself the following :

  • Do I answer the question? Re-reading the question prompt after constructing a working thesis can help you fix an argument that misses the focus of the question. If the prompt isn’t phrased as a question, try to rephrase it. For example, “Discuss the effect of X on Y” can be rephrased as “What is the effect of X on Y?”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? If your thesis simply states facts that no one would, or even could, disagree with, it’s possible that you are simply providing a summary, rather than making an argument.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? Thesis statements that are too vague often do not have a strong argument. If your thesis contains words like “good” or “successful,” see if you could be more specific: why is something “good”; what specifically makes something “successful”?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? If a reader’s first response is likely to  be “So what?” then you need to clarify, to forge a relationship, or to connect to a larger issue.
  • Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change. It’s okay to change your working thesis to reflect things you have figured out in the course of writing your paper. Remember, always reassess and revise your writing as necessary.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? If a reader’s first response is “how?” or “why?” your thesis may be too open-ended and lack guidance for the reader. See what you can add to give the reader a better take on your position right from the beginning.

Suppose you are taking a course on contemporary communication, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: “Discuss the impact of social media on public awareness.” Looking back at your notes, you might start with this working thesis:

Social media impacts public awareness in both positive and negative ways.

You can use the questions above to help you revise this general statement into a stronger thesis.

  • Do I answer the question? You can analyze this if you rephrase “discuss the impact” as “what is the impact?” This way, you can see that you’ve answered the question only very generally with the vague “positive and negative ways.”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not likely. Only people who maintain that social media has a solely positive or solely negative impact could disagree.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? No. What are the positive effects? What are the negative effects?
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? No. Why are they positive? How are they positive? What are their causes? Why are they negative? How are they negative? What are their causes?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? No. Why should anyone care about the positive and/or negative impact of social media?

After thinking about your answers to these questions, you decide to focus on the one impact you feel strongly about and have strong evidence for:

Because not every voice on social media is reliable, people have become much more critical consumers of information, and thus, more informed voters.

This version is a much stronger thesis! It answers the question, takes a specific position that others can challenge, and it gives a sense of why it matters.

Let’s try another. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.

You begin to analyze your thesis:

  • Do I answer the question? No. The prompt asks you to analyze some aspect of the novel. Your working thesis is a statement of general appreciation for the entire novel.

Think about aspects of the novel that are important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain develops a contrast between life on the river and life on the shore.
  • Do I answer the question? Yes!
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not really. This contrast is well-known and accepted.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? It’s getting there–you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation. However, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? Not yet. Compare scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions and anything else that seems interesting.
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?”

After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

Through its contrasting river and shore scenes, Twain’s Huckleberry Finn suggests that to find the true expression of American democratic ideals, one must leave “civilized” society and go back to nature.

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Anson, Chris M., and Robert A. Schwegler. 2010. The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers , 6th ed. New York: Longman.

Lunsford, Andrea A. 2015. The St. Martin’s Handbook , 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St Martin’s.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 2018. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing , 8th ed. New York: Pearson.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Christy Friend, Daniel Seward, and Maxine Hairston. 2010. The Scott, Foresman Handbook for Writers , 9th ed. Boston: Pearson Education.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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How to write a thesis statement + examples

Thesis statement

What is a thesis statement?

Is a thesis statement a question, how do you write a good thesis statement, how do i know if my thesis statement is good, examples of thesis statements, helpful resources on how to write a thesis statement, frequently asked questions about writing a thesis statement, related articles.

A thesis statement is the main argument of your paper or thesis.

The thesis statement is one of the most important elements of any piece of academic writing . It is a brief statement of your paper’s main argument. Essentially, you are stating what you will be writing about.

You can see your thesis statement as an answer to a question. While it also contains the question, it should really give an answer to the question with new information and not just restate or reiterate it.

Your thesis statement is part of your introduction. Learn more about how to write a good thesis introduction in our introduction guide .

A thesis statement is not a question. A statement must be arguable and provable through evidence and analysis. While your thesis might stem from a research question, it should be in the form of a statement.

Tip: A thesis statement is typically 1-2 sentences. For a longer project like a thesis, the statement may be several sentences or a paragraph.

A good thesis statement needs to do the following:

  • Condense the main idea of your thesis into one or two sentences.
  • Answer your project’s main research question.
  • Clearly state your position in relation to the topic .
  • Make an argument that requires support or evidence.

Once you have written down a thesis statement, check if it fulfills the following criteria:

  • Your statement needs to be provable by evidence. As an argument, a thesis statement needs to be debatable.
  • Your statement needs to be precise. Do not give away too much information in the thesis statement and do not load it with unnecessary information.
  • Your statement cannot say that one solution is simply right or simply wrong as a matter of fact. You should draw upon verified facts to persuade the reader of your solution, but you cannot just declare something as right or wrong.

As previously mentioned, your thesis statement should answer a question.

If the question is:

What do you think the City of New York should do to reduce traffic congestion?

A good thesis statement restates the question and answers it:

In this paper, I will argue that the City of New York should focus on providing exclusive lanes for public transport and adaptive traffic signals to reduce traffic congestion by the year 2035.

Here is another example. If the question is:

How can we end poverty?

A good thesis statement should give more than one solution to the problem in question:

In this paper, I will argue that introducing universal basic income can help reduce poverty and positively impact the way we work.

  • The Writing Center of the University of North Carolina has a list of questions to ask to see if your thesis is strong .

A thesis statement is part of the introduction of your paper. It is usually found in the first or second paragraph to let the reader know your research purpose from the beginning.

In general, a thesis statement should have one or two sentences. But the length really depends on the overall length of your project. Take a look at our guide about the length of thesis statements for more insight on this topic.

Here is a list of Thesis Statement Examples that will help you understand better how to write them.

Every good essay should include a thesis statement as part of its introduction, no matter the academic level. Of course, if you are a high school student you are not expected to have the same type of thesis as a PhD student.

Here is a great YouTube tutorial showing How To Write An Essay: Thesis Statements .

thesis example in sentence

Enago Academy

What Makes a Thesis Statement Spectacular? — 5 things to know

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Table of Contents

What Is a Thesis Statement?

A thesis statement is a declarative sentence that states the primary idea of an essay or a research paper . In this statement, the authors declare their beliefs or what they intend to argue in their research study. The statement is clear and concise, with only one or two sentences.

Thesis Statement — An Essential in Thesis Writing

A thesis statement distills the research paper idea into one or two sentences. This summary organizes your paper and develops the research argument or opinion. The statement is important because it lets the reader know what the research paper will talk about and how the author is approaching the issue. Moreover, the statement also serves as a map for the paper and helps the authors to track and organize their thoughts more efficiently.

A thesis statement can keep the writer from getting lost in a convoluted and directionless argument. Finally, it will also ensure that the research paper remains relevant and focused on the objective.

Where to Include the Thesis Statement?

The thesis statement is typically placed at the end of the introduction section of your essay or research paper. It usually consists of a single sentence of the writer’s opinion on the topic and provides a specific guide to the readers throughout the paper.

6 Steps to Write an Impactful Thesis Statement

Step 1 – analyze the literature.

Identify the knowledge gaps in the relevant research paper. Analyze the deeper implications of the author’s research argument. Was the research objective mentioned in the thesis statement reversed later in the discussion or conclusion? Does the author contradict themselves? Is there a major knowledge gap in creating a relevant research objective? Has the author understood and validated the fundamental theories correctly? Does the author support an argument without having supporting literature to cite? Answering these or related questions will help authors develop a working thesis and give their thesis an easy direction and structure.

Step 2 – Start with a Question

While developing a working thesis, early in the writing process, you might already have a research question to address. Strong research questions guide the design of studies and define and identify specific objectives. These objectives will assist the author in framing the thesis statement.

Step 3 – Develop the Answer

After initial research, the author could formulate a tentative answer to the research question. At this stage, the answer could be simple enough to guide the research and the writing process. After writing the initial answer, the author could elaborate further on why this is the chosen answer. After reading more about the research topic, the author could write and refine the answers to address the research question.

Step 4 – Write the First Draft of the Thesis Statement

After ideating the working thesis statement, make sure to write it down. It is disheartening to create a great idea for a thesis and then forget it when you lose concentration. The first draft will help you think clearly and logically. It will provide you with an option to align your thesis statement with the defined research objectives.

Step 5 – Anticipate Counter Arguments Against the Statement

After developing a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This list of arguments will help you refute the thesis later. Remember that every argument has a counterargument, and if yours does not have one, what you state is not an argument — it may be a fact or opinion, but not an argument.

Step 6 – Refine the Statement

Anticipating counterarguments will help you refine your statement further. A strong thesis statement should address —

  • Why does your research hold this stand?
  • What will readers learn from the essay?
  • Are the key points of your argumentative or narrative?
  • Does the final thesis statement summarize your overall argument or the entire topic you aim to explain in the research paper?

thesis example in sentence

5 Tips to Create a Compelling Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a crucial part of any academic paper. Clearly stating the main idea of your research helps you focus on the objectives of your paper. Refer to the following tips while drafting your statement:

1. Keep it Concise

The statement should be short and precise. It should contain no more than a couple of sentences.

2. Make it Specific

The statement should be focused on a specific topic or argument. Covering too many topics will only make your paper weaker.

3. Express an Opinion

The statement should have an opinion on an issue or controversy. This will make your paper arguable and interesting to read.

4. Be Assertive

The statement should be stated assertively and not hesitantly or apologetically. Remember, you are making an argument — you need to sound convincing!

5. Support with Evidence

The thesis should be supported with evidence from your paper. Make sure you include specific examples from your research to reinforce your objectives.

Thesis Statement Examples *

Example 1 – alcohol consumption.

High levels of alcohol consumption have harmful effects on your health, such as weight gain, heart disease, and liver complications.

This thesis statement states specific reasons why alcohol consumption is detrimental. It is not required to mention every single detriment in your thesis.

Example 2 – Benefits of the Internet

The internet serves as a means of expediently connecting people across the globe, fostering new friendships and an exchange of ideas that would not have occurred before its inception.

While the internet offers a host of benefits, this thesis statement is about choosing the ability that fosters new friendships and exchange ideas. Also, the research needs to prove how connecting people across the globe could not have happened before the internet’s inception — which is a focused research statement.

*The following thesis statements are not fully researched and are merely examples shown to understand how to write a thesis statement. Also, you should avoid using these statements for your own research paper purposes.

A gripping thesis statement is developed by understanding it from the reader’s point of view. Be aware of not developing topics that only interest you and have less reader attraction. A harsh yet necessary question to ask oneself is — Why should readers read my paper? Is this paper worth reading? Would I read this paper if I weren’t its author?

A thesis statement hypes your research paper. It makes the readers excited about what specific information is coming their way. This helps them learn new facts and possibly embrace new opinions.

Writing a thesis statement (although two sentences) could be a daunting task. Hope this blog helps you write a compelling one! Do consider using the steps to create your thesis statement and tell us about it in the comment section below.

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25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

JBirdwellBranson

Understanding what makes a good thesis statement is one of the major keys to writing a great research paper or argumentative essay. The thesis statement is where you make a claim that will guide you through your entire paper. If you find yourself struggling to make sense of your paper or your topic, then it's likely due to a weak thesis statement.

Let's take a minute to first understand what makes a solid thesis statement, and what key components you need to write one of your own.

Perfecting Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement always goes at the beginning of the paper. It will typically be in the first couple of paragraphs of the paper so that it can introduce the body paragraphs, which are the supporting evidence for your thesis statement.

Your thesis statement should clearly identify an argument. You need to have a statement that is not only easy to understand, but one that is debatable. What that means is that you can't just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute . An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic.

Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's cuteness is derived from its floppy ears, small body, and playfulness." These are three things that can be debated on. Some people might think that the cutest thing about puppies is the fact that they follow you around or that they're really soft and fuzzy.

All cuteness aside, you want to make sure that your thesis statement is not only debatable, but that it also actually thoroughly answers the research question that was posed. You always want to make sure that your evidence is supporting a claim that you made (and not the other way around). This is why it's crucial to read and research about a topic first and come to a conclusion later. If you try to get your research to fit your thesis statement, then it may not work out as neatly as you think. As you learn more, you discover more (and the outcome may not be what you originally thought).

Additionally, your thesis statement shouldn't be too big or too grand. It'll be hard to cover everything in a thesis statement like, "The federal government should act now on climate change." The topic is just too large to actually say something new and meaningful. Instead, a more effective thesis statement might be, "Local governments can combat climate change by providing citizens with larger recycling bins and offering local classes about composting and conservation." This is easier to work with because it's a smaller idea, but you can also discuss the overall topic that you might be interested in, which is climate change.

So, now that we know what makes a good, solid thesis statement, you can start to write your own. If you find that you're getting stuck or you are the type of person who needs to look at examples before you start something, then check out our list of thesis statement examples below.

Thesis statement examples

A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.

  • Vaccinations Because many children are unable to vaccinate due to illness, we must require that all healthy and able children be vaccinated in order to have herd immunity.
  • Educational Resources for Low-Income Students Schools should provide educational resources for low-income students during the summers so that they don't forget what they've learned throughout the school year.
  • School Uniforms School uniforms may be an upfront cost for families, but they eradicate the visual differences in income between students and provide a more egalitarian atmosphere at school.
  • Populism The rise in populism on the 2016 political stage was in reaction to increasing globalization, the decline of manufacturing jobs, and the Syrian refugee crisis.
  • Public Libraries Libraries are essential resources for communities and should be funded more heavily by local municipalities.
  • Cyber Bullying With more and more teens using smartphones and social media, cyber bullying is on the rise. Cyber bullying puts a lot of stress on many teens, and can cause depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts. Parents should limit the usage of smart phones, monitor their children's online activity, and report any cyber bullying to school officials in order to combat this problem.
  • Medical Marijuana for Veterans Studies have shown that the use of medicinal marijuana has been helpful to veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Medicinal marijuana prescriptions should be legal in all states and provided to these veterans. Additional medical or therapy services should also be researched and implemented in order to help them re-integrate back into civilian life.
  • Work-Life Balance Corporations should provide more work from home opportunities and six-hour workdays so that office workers have a better work-life balance and are more likely to be productive when they are in the office.
  • Teaching Youths about Consensual Sex Although sex education that includes a discussion of consensual sex would likely lead to less sexual assault, parents need to teach their children the meaning of consent from a young age with age appropriate lessons.
  • Whether or Not to Attend University A degree from a university provides invaluable lessons on life and a future career, but not every high school student should be encouraged to attend a university directly after graduation. Some students may benefit from a trade school or a "gap year" where they can think more intensely about what it is they want to do for a career and how they can accomplish this.
  • Studying Abroad Studying abroad is one of the most culturally valuable experiences you can have in college. It is the only way to get completely immersed in another language and learn how other cultures and countries are different from your own.
  • Women's Body Image Magazines have done a lot in the last five years to include a more diverse group of models, but there is still a long way to go to promote a healthy woman's body image collectively as a culture.
  • Cigarette Tax Heavily taxing and increasing the price of cigarettes is essentially a tax on the poorest Americans, and it doesn't deter them from purchasing. Instead, the state and federal governments should target those economically disenfranchised with early education about the dangers of smoking.
  • Veganism A vegan diet, while a healthy and ethical way to consume food, indicates a position of privilege. It also limits you to other cultural food experiences if you travel around the world.
  • University Athletes Should be Compensated University athletes should be compensated for their service to the university, as it is difficult for these students to procure and hold a job with busy academic and athletic schedules. Many student athletes on scholarship also come from low-income neighborhoods and it is a struggle to make ends meet when they are participating in athletics.
  • Women in the Workforce Sheryl Sandberg makes a lot of interesting points in her best-selling book, Lean In , but she only addressed the very privileged working woman and failed to speak to those in lower-skilled, lower-wage jobs.
  • Assisted Suicide Assisted suicide should be legal and doctors should have the ability to make sure their patients have the end-of-life care that they want to receive.
  • Celebrity and Political Activism Although Taylor Swift's lyrics are indicative of a feminist perspective, she should be more politically active and vocal to use her position of power for the betterment of society.
  • The Civil War The insistence from many Southerners that the South seceded from the Union for states' rights versus the fact that they seceded for the purposes of continuing slavery is a harmful myth that still affects race relations today.
  • Blue Collar Workers Coal miners and other blue-collar workers whose jobs are slowly disappearing from the workforce should be re-trained in jobs in the technology sector or in renewable energy. A program to re-train these workers would not only improve local economies where jobs have been displaced, but would also lead to lower unemployment nationally.
  • Diversity in the Workforce Having a diverse group of people in an office setting leads to richer ideas, more cooperation, and more empathy between people with different skin colors or backgrounds.
  • Re-Imagining the Nuclear Family The nuclear family was traditionally defined as one mother, one father, and 2.5 children. This outdated depiction of family life doesn't quite fit with modern society. The definition of normal family life shouldn't be limited to two-parent households.
  • Digital Literacy Skills With more information readily available than ever before, it's crucial that students are prepared to examine the material they're reading and determine whether or not it's a good source or if it has misleading information. Teaching students digital literacy and helping them to understand the difference between opinion or propaganda from legitimate, real information is integral.
  • Beauty Pageants Beauty pageants are presented with the angle that they empower women. However, putting women in a swimsuit on a stage while simultaneously judging them on how well they answer an impossible question in a short period of time is cruel and purely for the amusement of men. Therefore, we should stop televising beauty pageants.
  • Supporting More Women to Run for a Political Position In order to get more women into political positions, more women must run for office. There must be a grassroots effort to educate women on how to run for office, who among them should run, and support for a future candidate for getting started on a political career.

Still stuck? Need some help with your thesis statement?

If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you're on the right track. It's always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.

After you're done writing, it's important to have someone take a second look at your paper so that you can ensure there are no mistakes or errors. It's difficult to spot your own mistakes, which is why it's always recommended to have someone help you with the revision process, whether that's a teacher, the writing center at school, or a professional editor such as one from ServiceScape .

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Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Developing Strong Thesis Statements

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These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing.

The thesis statement or main claim must be debatable

An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people.

Example of a non-debatable thesis statement:

This thesis statement is not debatable. First, the word pollution implies that something is bad or negative in some way. Furthermore, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is unambiguously good.

Example of a debatable thesis statement:

This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money. Others might feel that we should be spending more money on education. Still others could argue that corporations, not the government, should be paying to limit pollution.

Another example of a debatable thesis statement:

In this example there is also room for disagreement between rational individuals. Some citizens might think focusing on recycling programs rather than private automobiles is the most effective strategy.

The thesis needs to be narrow

Although the scope of your paper might seem overwhelming at the start, generally the narrower the thesis the more effective your argument will be. Your thesis or claim must be supported by evidence. The broader your claim is, the more evidence you will need to convince readers that your position is right.

Example of a thesis that is too broad:

There are several reasons this statement is too broad to argue. First, what is included in the category "drugs"? Is the author talking about illegal drug use, recreational drug use (which might include alcohol and cigarettes), or all uses of medication in general? Second, in what ways are drugs detrimental? Is drug use causing deaths (and is the author equating deaths from overdoses and deaths from drug related violence)? Is drug use changing the moral climate or causing the economy to decline? Finally, what does the author mean by "society"? Is the author referring only to America or to the global population? Does the author make any distinction between the effects on children and adults? There are just too many questions that the claim leaves open. The author could not cover all of the topics listed above, yet the generality of the claim leaves all of these possibilities open to debate.

Example of a narrow or focused thesis:

In this example the topic of drugs has been narrowed down to illegal drugs and the detriment has been narrowed down to gang violence. This is a much more manageable topic.

We could narrow each debatable thesis from the previous examples in the following way:

Narrowed debatable thesis 1:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just the amount of money used but also how the money could actually help to control pollution.

Narrowed debatable thesis 2:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just what the focus of a national anti-pollution campaign should be but also why this is the appropriate focus.

Qualifiers such as " typically ," " generally ," " usually ," or " on average " also help to limit the scope of your claim by allowing for the almost inevitable exception to the rule.

Types of claims

Claims typically fall into one of four categories. Thinking about how you want to approach your topic, or, in other words, what type of claim you want to make, is one way to focus your thesis on one particular aspect of your broader topic.

Claims of fact or definition: These claims argue about what the definition of something is or whether something is a settled fact. Example:

Claims of cause and effect: These claims argue that one person, thing, or event caused another thing or event to occur. Example:

Claims about value: These are claims made of what something is worth, whether we value it or not, how we would rate or categorize something. Example:

Claims about solutions or policies: These are claims that argue for or against a certain solution or policy approach to a problem. Example:

Which type of claim is right for your argument? Which type of thesis or claim you use for your argument will depend on your position and knowledge of the topic, your audience, and the context of your paper. You might want to think about where you imagine your audience to be on this topic and pinpoint where you think the biggest difference in viewpoints might be. Even if you start with one type of claim you probably will be using several within the paper. Regardless of the type of claim you choose to utilize it is key to identify the controversy or debate you are addressing and to define your position early on in the paper.

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Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is arguable, which means a thoughtful reader could disagree with it and therefore needs your careful analysis of the evidence to understand how you arrived at this claim. You arrive at your thesis by examining and analyzing the evidence available to you, which might be text or other types of source material.

A thesis will generally respond to an analytical question or pose a solution to a problem that you have framed for your readers (and for yourself). When you frame that question or problem for your readers, you are telling them what is at stake in your argument—why your question matters and why they should care about the answer . If you can explain to your readers why a question or problem is worth addressing, then they will understand why it’s worth reading an essay that develops your thesis—and you will understand why it’s worth writing that essay.

A strong thesis will be arguable rather than descriptive , and it will be the right scope for the essay you are writing. If your thesis is descriptive, then you will not need to convince your readers of anything—you will be naming or summarizing something your readers can already see for themselves. If your thesis is too narrow, you won’t be able to explore your topic in enough depth to say something interesting about it. If your thesis is too broad, you may not be able to support it with evidence from the available sources.

When you are writing an essay for a course assignment, you should make sure you understand what type of claim you are being asked to make. Many of your assignments will be asking you to make analytical claims , which are based on interpretation of facts, data, or sources.

Some of your assignments may ask you to make normative claims. Normative claims are claims of value or evaluation rather than fact—claims about how things should be rather than how they are. A normative claim makes the case for the importance of something, the action that should be taken, or the way the world should be. When you are asked to write a policy memo, a proposal, or an essay based on your own opinion, you will be making normative claims.

Here are some examples of possible thesis statements for a student's analysis of the article “The Case Against Perfection” by Professor Michael Sandel.  

Descriptive thesis (not arguable)  

While Sandel argues that pursuing perfection through genetic engineering would decrease our sense of humility, he claims that the sense of solidarity we would lose is also important.

This thesis summarizes several points in Sandel’s argument, but it does not make a claim about how we should understand his argument. A reader who read Sandel’s argument would not also need to read an essay based on this descriptive thesis.  

Broad thesis (arguable, but difficult to support with evidence)  

Michael Sandel’s arguments about genetic engineering do not take into consideration all the relevant issues.

This is an arguable claim because it would be possible to argue against it by saying that Michael Sandel’s arguments do take all of the relevant issues into consideration. But the claim is too broad. Because the thesis does not specify which “issues” it is focused on—or why it matters if they are considered—readers won’t know what the rest of the essay will argue, and the writer won’t know what to focus on. If there is a particular issue that Sandel does not address, then a more specific version of the thesis would include that issue—hand an explanation of why it is important.  

Arguable thesis with analytical claim  

While Sandel argues persuasively that our instinct to “remake” (54) ourselves into something ever more perfect is a problem, his belief that we can always draw a line between what is medically necessary and what makes us simply “better than well” (51) is less convincing.

This is an arguable analytical claim. To argue for this claim, the essay writer will need to show how evidence from the article itself points to this interpretation. It’s also a reasonable scope for a thesis because it can be supported with evidence available in the text and is neither too broad nor too narrow.  

Arguable thesis with normative claim  

Given Sandel’s argument against genetic enhancement, we should not allow parents to decide on using Human Growth Hormone for their children.

This thesis tells us what we should do about a particular issue discussed in Sandel’s article, but it does not tell us how we should understand Sandel’s argument.  

Questions to ask about your thesis  

  • Is the thesis truly arguable? Does it speak to a genuine dilemma in the source, or would most readers automatically agree with it?  
  • Is the thesis too obvious? Again, would most or all readers agree with it without needing to see your argument?  
  • Is the thesis complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of argument?  
  • Is the thesis supportable with evidence from the text rather than with generalizations or outside research?  
  • Would anyone want to read a paper in which this thesis was developed? That is, can you explain what this paper is adding to our understanding of a problem, question, or topic?
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The Thesis Sentence

The thesis sentence is arguably the most important sentence in an academic paper. Without a good, clear thesis that presents an intriguing arguable point, a paper risks becoming unfocused, aimless, not worth the reader's time.

The Challenge of the Thesis Sentence

Because the thesis sentence is the most important sentence of a paper, it is also the most difficult to write. Readers expect a great deal of a thesis sentence: they want it to powerfully and clearly indicate what the writer is going to say, why she is going to say it, and even how it is that she is going to go about getting it said. In other words, the job of the thesis sentence is to organize, predict, control, and define the paper's argument.

In many cases, a thesis sentence will not only present the paper's argument, it will also point to and direct the course that the argument is going to take. In other words, it may also include an "essay map" - i.e., phrases or clauses that map out for the reader (and the writer) the argument that is to come. In some cases, then, the thesis sentence not only promises an argument, it promises the structure of that argument as well.

The promises that a thesis sentence makes to a reader are important ones and must be kept. It's helpful sometimes to explain the thesis as a kind of contract between reader and writer: if this contract is broken, the reader will feel frustrated and betrayed. Accordingly, the writer must be very careful in the development of the thesis.

Working on the Thesis Sentence

Chances are if you've had trouble following or deciphering the argument of a paper, there's a problem with the thesis. If a tutor's first response to a paper is that he doesn't know what the paper is about, then the thesis sentence is either absent from the paper, or it's hiding. The first thing you might wish to do is to ask the writer what his thesis is. He may point to a particular sentence that he thinks is his thesis, giving you a very good place to start.

Let's say that you've read a paper in which you've encountered this thesis:

Although heterosexuality has long been regarded as the only natural expression of sexuality, this view has been recently and strongly challenged by the gay rights movement.

What's wrong with this sentence? Many things, the most troublesome of which is that it argues nothing. Who is going to deny that the heteronormative view has been challenged by the gay rights movement? At this point, you need to ask the writer some questions. In what specific ways has the gay rights movement challenged heterosexuality? Do these ways seem reasonable to the writer? Why or why not? What argument does he intend to make about this topic? Why does he want to make it? To whom does he want to make it?

After giving the writer some time to think about and talk about these questions, you'll probably want to bring up another problem that is certain to arise out of a thesis like this one: the matter of structure. Any paper that follows a thesis like this one is likely to ramble. How can the reader figure out what all the supporting paragraphs are doing when the argument itself is so ill-defined? You'll want to show the writer that a strong thesis suggests - even helps to create - strong topic sentences. (More on this when we consider matters of structure, below).

But before we move on to other matters, let's consider the problem of this thesis from another angle: its style. We can see without difficulty that the sentence presents us with at least two stylistic problems: 1) this thesis, which should be the most powerful sentence of the paper, employs the passive voice, and 2) the introductory clause functions as a dangling modifier (who regards heterosexuality as the only natural way to express sexuality?).

Both stylistic problems point to something at work in the sentence: the writer obliterates the actors - heterosexuals and homosexuals alike - by using the dangling modifier and the passive voice. Why does he do that? Is he avoiding naming the actors in these sentences because he's not comfortable with the positions they take? Is he unable to declare himself because he feels paralyzed by the sense that he must write a paper that is politically correct? Or does he obliterate the actors with the passive voice because he himself wishes to remain passive on this topic?

These are questions to pose to the writer, though they must be posed gently. In fact, you might gently pose these questions via a discussion of style. For instance, you might also suggest that the writer rewrite the sentence in the active voice:

Although our society has long regarded heterosexuality as the only natural expression of sexuality, members of the gay rights movement have challenged this view strongly.

This active construction helps us to see clearly what's missing:

Although our society has long regarded heterosexuality as the only natural expression of sexuality, members of the gay rights movement have challenged this view strongly, arguing XYZ.

This more active construction also makes it clear that merely enumerating the points the author wants to make is not the same thing as creating an argument. The writer should now be able to see that he needs to go one step further - he needs to reveal his own position on the gay rights movement. The rest of the paper will develop this position.

In short, there are many ways to begin work on a writer's thesis sentences. Almost all of them will lead you to other matters important to the paper's success: its structure, its language, its style. Try to make any conversation you have about thesis sentences point to other problems with the writing. Not only is this strategy efficient, but it also encourages a writer to see how important a thesis is to the overall success of his essay.

Talking Your Way to a Workable Thesis

For the sake of making (we hope) a somewhat humorous illustration of the matter at hand, we offer the following scenario, which shows how tutor and tutee can talk their way to a workable thesis - and, indeed, to a good essay. So sit back, and enjoy this "break" in your training.

Imagine (though it is indeed quite a stretch) that a freshman composition teacher has the audacity to assign a paper on cats (the animals, not the play). The students may write any kind of paper they like - narration, description, compare/contrast, etc. - as long as their essays contain a thesis (that is, that they argue some point) concerning cats. A writer comes to you for help in developing her thesis. You read the assignment, and then you tell the writer that she first must choose the kind of paper she would like to do. She decides to do a narrative because she thinks she has more freedom in the narrative form. Then you ask her what she has to say about cats. "I don't like them," is her reply.

"OK," you say, "that's a start. Why don't you like them?" The writer has lots of reasons: they smell, they're aloof, they shed, they keep you up nights when they're in heat, they're very middle class, they steal food off of the table, they don't get along with dogs (the writer loves dogs), and on, and on. After brainstorming for a while, you tell the writer to choose a few points on which she'd like to focus - preferably those points that she feels strongly about or those which seem unusual. She picks three: cats smell, they steal food, and they are middle class. She offers her thesis: "I don't like cats because they are smelly, thieving, and middle class."

"O.K.," you say, "It's not a very sophisticated thesis but we can use it for now. After all, it defines your stance, it controls your subject, it organizes your argument, and it predicts your strategy - all the things that a thesis ought to do. Now let's consider how to develop the thesis, point by point."

You begin to ask questions about cats and their smell. "What do they smell like?" you say. The writer thinks awhile, and then says, "They smell like dirty gym shorts, like old hamburgers, like my eighth-grade math teacher's breath." The writer laughs, particularly fond of the final simile. Then she adds, "My boyfriend has a cat. A Tom. When he moved into his first apartment, that cat sprayed all over the place, you know, marking his territory. The place stunk so bad that I couldn't even go there for a week. Can you imagine? Your boyfriend gets his first apartment, and you can't even go in the place for a week?"

The writer has sparked your imagination; you think that she can spark her teacher's imagination as well. "Why don't you do your narrative about your boyfriend's cat? You could tell the story - or you could make up a story - about going over there for dinner, hoping for a romantic evening, and being put off by the cat." The writer likes this idea and goes off to write her draft. She returns with the following story about her boyfriend and his cat.

She was hoping for a romantic dinner; he was making her favorite meal. She could smell the T-bone and the apple pie before she even got to his door. But when she opened the door, her appetite was obliterated: the smell of cat spray smelled worse than her eighth-grade math teacher's breath. Of course, because she remained hopeful for a romantic evening, she put on her best face, tried not to grimace, and gave her boyfriend the flowers she'd picked up on the way. They chat; everything is going fine; he goes to the kitchen to check on dinner; she hears his shriek. The cat has stolen all of the food! Upon searching, they find the cat under the sofa, not only with their dinner, but with the writer's wallet, her favorite picture of her mom torn in half, her new leather jacket now full of cat hairs. This cat not only stinks, he's a thief as well. Still, the evening need not be a total waste. They order pizza, have some wine. She and her man talk; their moods improve, and she decides that it might be a nice time to kiss. She pulls the old yawn trick to get her arm around him, and just as she's ready to kiss him the cat jumps into his lap. "Oh, Pookie, Pookie, Pookie," her boyfriend says, giving himself over to the purring cat. "Damn lap cat," the writer says to herself, and leaves it at that. She has written a paper illustrating that cats are smelly, thieving, and middle class. She has fulfilled her thesis.

Now, you like this paper. It's got a great voice, and it's got humor. You feel, however, that the writer should refine the thesis. It has served the writer well in helping her to organize, control, predict, and define her essay; however, she needs now to consider how to choose words and a tone which will hook the reader and reel him in. You explain to the writer that her thesis can be humorous, that she can feel free to be extreme, because a funny, exaggerated thesis would suit this funny, exaggerated paper.

After some doodling and some dialogue, the writer comes up with the following thesis: "All cats should be exterminated because they are the stinking, kleptomaniacal darlings of the bourgeoisie." You laugh; you like it. Moreover, the thesis has given the writer an ending for her essay: she exterminates the cat in her boyfriend's microwave, convinces him to get a goldfish instead, and the two of them live happily ever after. The writer is happy. The tutor is happy. The paper works.

While you will likely not encounter a "cat" assignment at Dartmouth, this sort of experience with writing a thesis is a common one. Even when papers are more sophisticated than this one - even when the subject is Hitler's rise to power, or Freud's treatment of taboo - writers will often write a working thesis, one that guides them through the writing process. Then they will return to the thesis, sometimes several times before their paper is finished, revising it to better fit their paper's increasingly refined argument and tone.

Polishing the Thesis Sentence

Look at the sentence's structure. Is the main idea of the paper placed appropriately in the main clause? If there are parallel points made in the paper, does the thesis sentence signal this to the reader via some parallel structure? If the paper makes an interesting but necessary aside, is that aside predicted - perhaps in a parenthetical element? Remember: the structure of the thesis sentence also signals much to the reader about the structure of the argument. Be sure that the thesis reflects, reliably, what the paper itself is going to say.

As to the style of the sentence: hold the thesis sentence to the highest stylistic standards. Help a writer to make sure that it is as clear and concise as it can be, and that its language and phrasing reflect confidence, eloquence, and grace.

Mastering the Thesis Statement: Examples and Tips for Academic Success

What is the thesis statement? When it comes to writing an essay , there are many things that we must take into consideration in order to create a well-written and respected piece of work. One such thing is the thesis statement. Every good essay should have one and it needs to be well-written and well-thought-out. In this article, we are going to be looking at exactly what a thesis statement is and what it is used for as well as looking at some examples of the thesis statement as a way to gain a greater understanding of what its function is.

A thesis statement plays a crucial role in any well-crafted essay, as it helps both the writer and the reader establish the central point of the paper. Typically found near the end of the introduction, this sentence succinctly conveys the main idea the writer intends to communicate throughout the essay. Crafting a strong thesis statement increases the likelihood that the resulting essay will be cohesive, persuasive, and engaging for the audience.

Creating an effective thesis statement can, at times, be a challenging process. One useful method is to begin by exploring examples that illustrate the various ways in which thesis statements can be constructed, depending on the type of essay or paper being written. Studying these examples can help budding writers grasp the principles behind crafting compelling thesis statements, and serve as inspiration for their own work.

Table of Contents

What Is A Thesis Statement?

Definition and purpose.

In the most simple terms, a thesis statement is a short statement that provides insight into what the essay is going to be about. They are used to enlighten the audience on a variety of things, including:

  • The main argument or point to be discussed.
  • The purpose of the essay.
  • The point of view of the author on a specific topic.

A thesis statement is a sentence that encapsulates the central point or main idea of a paper or essay. It is typically found near the end of the introduction and serves as a guide to the reader, outlining the writer’s stance on the topic. The thesis statement not only answers the question asked but also acts as a roadmap for the paper, indicating what the reader can expect throughout the rest of the paper.

The purpose of a thesis statement is two-fold:

  • To convey a clear and concise argument or position on the topic.
  • To inspire further discussion and responses from the audience.

It’s crucial for a thesis statement to be focused, specific, and arguable. A strong thesis is easy to understand and provides a solid foundation for supporting evidence within the paper.

Types of Thesis Statements

Argumentative thesis statement.

An argumentative thesis statement is a claim that takes a strong position on an issue. This type of thesis statement aims to persuade the reader to accept the writer’s viewpoint by presenting logical reasoning and supporting evidence. It is essential to have a clear and concise argumentative thesis statement to guide the rest of the essay.

For example: “ Public transportation should be free in metropolitan areas to reduce carbon emissions and economic inequalities.”

Expository Essay Thesis Statement

An expository essay thesis statement highlights a specific issue or fact that the writer will explain or analyze throughout the essay. This type of thesis should be informative and objective, without taking a strong stance on the issue.

For example: “ High-level competitive athletes face numerous physical, mental, and emotional challenges throughout their careers. ”

Persuasive Thesis Statement

A persuasive thesis statement is similar to an argumentative thesis statement, but it aims to convince the reader to take action or adopt the writer’s viewpoint through emotional appeal and relatable examples. The persuasive thesis statement should be thought-provoking and debatable.

For example: “ Animal shelters should require background checks and home visits to ensure responsible pet adoption and prevent animal abuse. ”

Compare and Contrast Thesis Statement

A compare-and-contrast thesis statement sets the stage for an essay comparing or contrasting two or more subjects. This type of thesis statement may highlight similarities, differences, or a mix of both. It is crucial to establish a basis for comparison to provide a clear focus for the essay.

For example: “ While both public and private universities offer a variety of educational opportunities, the differences in cost, class size, and campus environment directly impact a student’s experience .”

By understanding and applying these types of thesis statements, writers can effectively tailor their essays’ tone and focus to suit their specific purpose and audience.

How Is A Thesis Statement Used?

As we mentioned a thesis statement is used to point out the main argument of the essay. There are certain rules that should be followed by the thesis statement. Let’s take a look at these in a little more detail.

  • A thesis statement should appear in the introduction of the essay to layout the main topic and the author’s stance on it. It should also appear in the conclusion of the essay, where the author can refer back to it.
  • A thesis statement should be a short statement of only one or two sentences that delivers clear and concise information.
  • The thesis statement will directly answer the main question posed by the essay, for example, if the essay question were ‘What is the biggest tourist attraction in France?’ The thesis statement might directly reply to this with ‘With over 6 million visitors each year, the Eiffel Tower is clearly the biggest tourist attraction in France.’ If the essay topic doesn’t contain a question, you can fashion one yourself.
  • Many people use the ‘so what?’ technique when writing a thesis statement. If a reader is likely to think ‘so what?’ when starting your essay, you can use the thesis statement to form a relationship and a connection to the issue that will engage the reader and make them care about what is going to be talked about.
  • Similarly to the above point, a thesis statement should answer why or how questions that the reader may have. Look again at the example of the Eiffel Tower, the statement clearly shows the reader why the tower is the biggest tourist attraction in France using real statistics that cannot be ignored. But in the same breath, gives the reader the chance to dispute the information. This is another key point to the thesis statement. A reader should be able to look at the thesis statement and disagree with it, this might encourage them to research the topic themselves.
  • A thesis statement should agree with the body of the essay. If it does not, then it should be amended. Using the example of the French tourist attraction once again, the body of that essay would need to go into further detail about the tourist attractions in France and further prove why the Eiffel Tower is the most popular.

Creating a Strong Thesis Statement

Identifying your topic and scope.

When creating a strong thesis statement, it is essential to first identify your topic and the scope of your paper. You should consider the central idea you want to communicate and its impact on your field of study, whether it’s art, education, or environmental studies. A solid thesis statement should focus on a single aspect of your research, avoiding general terms or abstractions. Keep it clear and specific to ensure it effectively guides both you and the reader through your argument.

Forming a Debatable Claim

An argumentative thesis statement should present a debatable claim, one that reasonable people could disagree with. This means that it should not merely be a statement of fact, but rather an assertion that invites different opinions. For example, a debatable claim on nationalism could be, “Nationalism contributed to the rise of populism in the 21st century.” This claim allows for various arguments, opinions, and contextual interpretations.

Providing Evidence

A strong thesis statement should also set the stage for presenting evidence supporting your claim. In a research paper, this means providing an overview of the key elements and sources you will use to build your argument. For an argumentative essay, be prepared to provide well-researched and detailed evidence to back up your claim, whether it’s regarding renewable energy sources, the history of race and gender, or the role of nationalism in shaping global politics.

Here are some tips to help you write a strong thesis statement:

  • Make sure it’s clear and concise, typically consisting of one or two sentences.
  • Ensure that it’s focused and specific enough to be “proven” within the boundaries of your paper.
  • Position it near the end of your essay’s introduction or within the first paragraph.

By following these guidelines and being mindful of your topic, scope, and evidence, you will be able to craft a powerful thesis statement that engages your audience and sets the stage for a successful research or argumentative paper.

Explore more: How To Write A Thesis Statement

Thesis Statement Examples

Argumentative thesis examples.

An argumentative thesis aims to establish a position and persuade the reader with evidence and reasoning. Examples include:

  • Though populism may fundamentally challenge traditional political structures, its effects on social and economic policies are necessary for a more equitable society.
  • Social media platforms are responsible for the increasing polarization of opinions and must adopt measures to limit the spread of misinformation.

Expository Essay Thesis Examples

An expository essay thesis presents facts, evidence, or an explanation without taking a persuasive stance. Examples include:

  • The process of photosynthesis is fundamental to the survival of plants and the ecosystems they support, providing energy for growth and reproduction.
  • Urbanization has led to numerous social, economic, and environmental consequences, including increased housing demand, traffic congestion, and pollution.

Persuasive Thesis Examples

A persuasive thesis seeks to convince the reader of a particular argument or opinion. Examples include:

  • The benefits of implementing a universal basic income outweigh the potential drawbacks, as it can alleviate poverty and provide residents with more financial security.
  • Investing in renewable energy sources is essential for combating climate change and ensuring a sustainable future for subsequent generations.

Compare and Contrast Thesis Examples

A compare and contrast thesis highlights the similarities and differences between two or more subjects. Examples include:

  • While both traditional and online education offer unique advantages and challenges, the flexibility and accessibility of online learning make it a more suitable option for students juggling work and personal responsibilities.
  • Despite similarities in their genre and themes, the novels “Pride and Prejudice” and “Wuthering Heights” differ significantly in their narrative styles and characterization.

Using these examples, you can create strong thesis statements tailored to your essay’s specific topic and goals. Remember to provide a clear and concise thesis that effectively showcases your argument, opinion, or comparison in a confident, knowledgeable, and neutral tone.

Thesis Statement Examples: Issues to Consider

Impact on society.

When creating a thesis statement, it’s essential to consider the potential impacts on society. The chosen topic may address issues such as education, war, and nationalism. For example, the thesis statement might analyze the effects of changing educational policies on different classes of society. This could include exploring access to education for low-income households or the impact of privatization on public schools. It is crucial to examine how the thesis topic relates to societal issues and incorporates them into the statement.

Related: Social Issues

Race, Gender, and Class

It is important to address issues related to race, gender, and class when developing thesis statements. For instance, research papers might examine inequalities in the workplace or disparities in access to resources. Such studies should think about context and historical background, comparing and contrasting the experiences of different groups. Here are some examples.

  • Gender : An examination of the gender pay gap across various industries
  • Race : A comparison of racial profiling incidents in law enforcement across different communities
  • Class : Exploring the impact of socio-economic status on healthcare access and outcomes

Consider using tables and bullet points to help present data and findings more effectively.

Environmental Concerns

Lastly, incorporating environmental concerns into thesis statements is essential, especially in today’s world, where sustainability and environmental protection are vital. Research papers might address issues such as pollution, waste management, or the effects of climate change on marginalized communities. For example, a thesis statement could focus on exploring the consequences of a specific eco-friendly initiative in a local community, or how environmental policies have evolved over time.

Keep in mind to maintain a confident, knowledgeable, neutral, and clear tone of voice throughout the section, focusing on accurate information and avoiding exaggerated or false claims.

Examples of Thesis Statements in Different Essay Types

In a narrative essay , the thesis statement revolves around the story being told. It is typically centered on a specific event, person, or experience that had a significant impact on the writer. The thesis statement in a narrative essay serves as a brief preview of what the reader can expect. It should provide some insight into the writer’s personal connection to the topic and help set the stage for the narrative to unfold.

For example:

The moment she won the lottery, Mary’s life changed forever, teaching her the importance of cherishing every moment with her loved ones.

An analytical essay breaks down a topic into its main components and presents an evaluation or interpretation of the topic based on those components. The thesis statement in an analytical essay should clearly state the issue or idea that will be analyzed and its essential elements. This type of statement should provide enough information to guide the reader through the essay and highlight the central points of analysis.

By examining the symbolism, characterization, and theme of “The Great Gatsby,” it becomes evident that Fitzgerald uses these techniques to criticize the American Dream’s materialism and superficiality.

Argumentative

In an argumentative essay , the thesis statement takes a clear, definitive stance on a specific issue or question. This type of thesis statement aims to persuade readers of the writer’s viewpoint and provide logical and supporting evidence to back up the claim. The thesis should be concise, specific, and controversial enough to encourage debate from various perspectives.

Although some people argue that video games can be beneficial, this essay will demonstrate that excessive video gaming is linked to increased violent behavior, addiction, and social isolation, and therefore requires stricter regulation.

Cause and Effect

A cause-and-effect essay explores the relationship between certain events, actions, or conditions and their respective outcomes. The thesis statement in a cause-and-effect essay should establish the connection between the cause and the effect, asserting a causal connection between the two. This type of thesis statement should present a clear, coherent structure to guide the reader through the essay and should establish the relationship between the cause and the effect.

The widespread use of smartphones has led to increased incidents of sleep deprivation among teenagers, resulting in declining academic performance, mood disorders, and health issues.

These are examples of how thesis statements can vary based on the type of essay and showcase the importance of tailoring the thesis statement to fit the specific requirements of each essay style.

More Thesis Statement Examples

Now that we are clear on what a thesis statement is and how it can be used, we are going to take a look at some examples of strong and effective thesis statements. This will give you a better idea on what they should contain and how they function within an essay.

American Education

The American education system has been evolving, and it is essential to have a clear thesis statement when discussing the topic. Here’s an example:

The integration of technology in American schools has significantly enhanced the learning experience of students, resulting in improved academic performance.

In this example, it highlights the positive impact of technology on the education system. It also provides a concise view that can be explored and supported through research and relevant statistics.

Internet and Society

The internet has changed the way society functions in various capacities. Here is a thesis statement example that can be used to discuss the relationship between the internet and society:

The widespread use of the internet has drastically altered societal interactions, affecting the population’s ability to communicate, access information, and maintain personal privacy.

This statement outlines the primary effects of the internet on society and can be further developed through specific examples and analysis. This statement can be supported through studies, data, and real-life cases that demonstrate the impact of the internet on communication, information access, and privacy concerns.

List of Thesis Statement Examples

  • Owing to the fact that many children are not being vaccinated because of illness, it is now imperative that we make it a requirement that healthy children are vaccinated in order to stop the spread of disease.
  • For families on a low income, schools should provide basic equipment such as pens, calculators and laptops.
  • Whilst school uniforms are expensive, they do provide security and a sense of belonging to students and for this reason, are an integral part of the school system.
  • Many public libraries are closing down due to lack of interest but these are important resources within the community and we should fight to keep them open.
  • With the internet becoming ever more popular and accessible to teenagers, cyber bullying is massively on the rise. A large number of cyber bullying cases end in suicide and it is down to parents and schools to tackle this growing problem.
  • Cannabis is not legal in many countries and states and this is for good reason. The drug is known to diminish the brain cells and regardless of how it might relax pain and anxiety, it should not be legalised.
  • Too many people are taking time of work for stress-related reasons and so it is more important than ever for workplaces to provide internal activities to combat this problem.
  • Many parents do not like the idea of their children being taught sex education at an early age but unfortunately in this day and age, it is a necessity if we want to keep children safe.

Avoiding Common Mistakes

When writing a thesis statement, it is essential to avoid common mistakes that may weaken your argument or confuse your reader. In this section, we will discuss two main pitfalls to avoid: Overgeneralizing and Using Weak or Vague Language.

Overgeneralizing

Overgeneralizing refers to making broad, sweeping claims in your thesis statement without providing specific, concrete evidence to support them. To avoid overgeneralization, focus on providing a clear and concise argument, grounded in solid research and evidence. Brainstorm specific examples or points you will address in your paper that support your thesis. For example, if your thesis is about a controversial topic, make sure your argument is based on valid research and takes a clear direction, rather than making generalized statements.

To prevent overgeneralization in your thesis statement:

  • Narrow the focus of your argument.
  • Ensure your claim is specific and backed up by evidence.
  • Be consistent with the goals and direction outlined in your paper.

Using Weak or Vague Language

Using weak or vague language in your thesis statement can result in a lack of clarity and create confusion for your reader. To maintain a strong, clear, and convincing thesis, avoid using weak or unclear terms, such as “interesting” or “might.” Instead, use assertive and definitive language that demonstrates your confidence and knowledge of the subject matter. For instance, if you are writing about a potential solution to a problem, make sure to express your stance in a strong, clear way to entice your reader and promise valuable insights.

To strengthen the language of your thesis statement:

  • Avoid using vague or ambiguous terms.
  • Use clear, specific language that directly communicates your argument.
  • Stay focused on your main points and the direction of your paper.

Keeping these tips in mind and utilizing clear language will contribute to a stronger, more effective thesis statement.

Crafting Engaging Introductions and Conclusions

Writing a hook.

A successful introduction begins with an attention-grabbing hook. A hook is an opening statement that piques the reader’s interest and encourages them to continue reading. There are various types of hooks, such as using a quote, posing a question, or stating an intriguing fact. The hook should be relevant to the topic and set the tone for the rest of the article.

Connecting Thesis Statement to Conclusion

The conclusion of an academic paper should restate the thesis statement and summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs. However, it’s important to do this in a way that doesn’t merely repeat the same information, but instead provides a sense of closure and emphasizes the significance of the topic.

One way to achieve this is by connecting the thesis statement to the conclusion through the use of topic sentences and counterarguments. A well-crafted topic sentence should introduce the main idea of a body paragraph, while a counterargument addresses potential objections to the thesis statement. Utilizing these elements effectively throughout the paper creates a sense of cohesion and allows for a smooth transition from the introduction to the conclusion.

By incorporating engaging hooks and thoughtfully connecting the thesis statement to the conclusion, the reader is more likely to be drawn into the article and appreciate the depth of the content presented.

Thesis Statement Infographic

Thesis Statement: Definition, Useful Tips and Examples of Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is made up of one or two sentences and gives the author the chance to tell the reader what the essay is going to be about as well as their stance on the topic. It should be clear and concise and should always tie in with the body paragraphs of the essay .

Whilst there are many points to consider when writing a thesis statement, a well-written one can answer a question and engage the reader in the essay. Sticking with the ‘rules’ of the thesis statement will allow the author to craft a well-written and relevant essay.

FAQs on Thesis Statement

What is a thesis statement.

A thesis statement is a sentence or two in an essay or research paper that presents the main argument or central idea of the paper. It tells the reader what to expect, guides the structure of the paper, and directly answers the question or topic being discussed.

How do I write a thesis statement?

There are four simple steps to write a thesis statement:

  • Start with a question : Identify the topic or question your paper will explore.
  • Write your initial answer : This should be a concise statement that provides a preliminary answer to the question.
  • Develop your answer : Expand on your initial answer by considering its implications, context, and evidence.
  • Refine your thesis statement : Revise and refine your statement to make it clear, specific, and arguable.

Where should the thesis statement be placed?

The placement of the thesis statement varies depending on the type of paper or essay. However, a common place for the thesis statement is at the end of the introduction paragraph, making it easier for the reader to identify the main argument early in the text.

What makes a good thesis statement?

A good thesis statement should be:

  • Clear : It should communicate your main point without confusion.
  • Specific : It should focus on a single topic or argument.
  • Arguable : It should present a claim that people can reasonably disagree on.
  • Relevant : It should relate to the purpose of the paper and contribute to its overall message.

What are the different types of thesis statements?

There are two main types of thesis statements:

  • Analytical : An analytical thesis breaks down an issue or idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents the breakdown and evaluation to the audience.
  • Expository (explanatory) : An expository thesis explains something to the audience.

Remember, as you work on your thesis statement, keep the rest of your paper in mind to ensure that it aligns with the paper’s overall content and objective.

  • How To Write An Essay
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  • Topic Sentence
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Last Updated on May 11, 2023

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101 Thesis Statement Examples

thesis statement examples and definition, explained below

The biggest thing to remember when writing a thesis statement is that it has to present a point of view .

Too often, my students present statements that are vague and don’t present an argument or perspective.

E.g. this is a bad statement that I often see:

  • “Climate Change and Rising Temperatures”

This is a topic, not a thesis statement. But I see it far too often. Instead, you’ll want to present a perspective that you’ll defend in your piece, e.g:

  • “Cliimate change will cause a mass refugee crisis by 2050.”

Below, I’ll present 101 examples of good thesis statements. Look through them for inspiration, then at the end of this article, take a look at my checklist of suggestions for using your thesis statement in a dissertation or essay.

Examples of strong Thesis Statements

For persuasive essays.

  • Animal Rights: “Animals in captivity have innate rights, including the right to regularly live outside of cages and the right to be free from abuse.”
  • School Uniforms Bad : “School uniforms should be banned in all schools because they restrict individuality and free expression.”
  • School Uniforms Good : “School uniforms are good because they teach young people the importance of following rules and dressing appropriately.”
  • Climate Change: “Mitigating climate change effects is the responsibility of all individuals, who should take active steps to decrease their environmental footprints.”
  • Class Sizes: “Class sizes in schools should never exceed 23, so that all children get sufficient time with their teacher.”
  • Health Foods: “Goods and services taxes should not be applied to health foods in order to make them more accessible to all, while sugar taxes should be implemented to discourage sugar consumption.”
  • Urban Housing: “All new urban housing should be built for low-cost housing, and elite or expensive housing developments should be banned.”
  • Physical Education: “Physical education should be mandatory in schools at all grade levels because it has a positive effect not only on health, but also social skills required in the 21st Century.”
  • Reading Habits: “Parents should set the standard of reading daily by reading in front of their children, rather than simply by telling their students to go to their rooms and read.”
  • Public Libraries: “Public libraries should receive increased funding because they act as important community hubs, especially for the poor and disadvantaged.”

for High School Topics

  • Literature: “In Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ the moral development that Jem and Scout experience is a direct result of their ability to develop empathy across racial lines.”
  • History: “The fall of the Roman Empire can be attributed to no single cause, but rather should attributed to three main factors: internal disputes, economic decline, and barbarian raids.”
  • Social Media: “Adults’ moralistic concerns about children’s social media use is undermined by the fact most adults are more addicted to the internet than their children.”
  • Education: “Online education is not as good for society as in-person education because it does not equip young people with real-life interpersonal skills.”
  • Climate Change: “Climate change is an unstoppable force and any efforts to mitigate its effects are too little, too late.”
  • Artificial Intelligence Good: “Our society is currently experiencing an unjustified moral panic about AI, which will actually improve humans’ lives by creating greater efficiency and productivity, coupled with lower prices for consumers.”
  • Artificial Intelligence Bad: “The rise of AI tools will lead to mass layoffs and a greater economic divide between the haves and have-nots.”
  • Music: “The evolution of rap music since its emergence in the 1980s, and especially its incorporation into the mainstream, represents another victory for civil rights and the recognition of African Americans to American culture .”
  • Sports: “The greatest benefit from youth sports is not necessarily physical health, but rather soft skills like leadership , teamwork, and self-esteem that are learned during gameplay.
  • Digital Divide: “Today’s extensive use of technology into classrooms, while helping to create a more interactive and gamified learning environment, has also had a negative effect on equality of opportunities and outcomes due to disparities in student access to technology.”

for Psychology Topics

  • Childhood Trauma: “Trauma in childhood is a major cause of long-term mental health problems and comes with extreme social costs, and therefore, early intervention should become the key focus for young people immediately after traumatic events.”
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) should be a core therapeutic strategy for all counselors and therapists due to the extensive evidence of its positive effects on the most common mental health issues facaed today.”
  • Effects of Sleep Deprivation: “Chronic sleep deprivation, a key driver or physical and mental health issues, as well as long-term health, is exacerbated by social and cultural factors such as long work hours and the hustle culture.
  • Social Media and Mental Health: “The use of social media amongst teens should be more heavily regulated in order to decrease incidences of mental health issues between the ages of 12 and 25.”
  • Mindfulness Meditation: “Mindfulness meditation has shown promise as a tool in reducing stress and improving mental clarity, with potential implications for treating mood disorders.”
  • Influence of Parenting Styles: “The helicopter parenting style leads to poorer academic, interpersonal, and social outcomes than authoritative parenting.
  • Nature vs. Nurture: “In understanding human behavior, both nature and nurture have an effect on a person’s actions, but nature is the factor over which we have the most control.”
  • Habituation: “Habituation to irrelevant stimuli is an essential skill for psychological development in middle childhood.
  • Music Therapy: “Music therapy can provide emotional and psychological benefits for students studying for exams.”
  • Cognitive Development: “Piaget’s theory of cognitive development fails to account for differences in the development of language and critical thinking skills across cultural divides.

for Sociology Topics

  • Income Inequality: “The widening income gap between the top 10% and the rest of Americans is a direct result of three decades of neoliberal economic policies designed to favor overall wealth creation at the expense of shared prosperity.”
  • Gender Roles: “Gender is/is not a social construct reproduced through media and parenting.
  • Ethnic Enclaves: “Ethnic enclaves in major cities is a natural result of immigrants gravitating toward others who share their language and culture, and therefore can provide support during times of integration.”
  • Globalization Bad: “Globalization has been a net negative in society due to the dilution of local identities around the world.”
  • Globalization Good: “While globalization has displaced many people around the world, its net benefit has been the rise of the middle-class in developing nations, a period of unprecedented peace, and greater opportunities for all.”
  • Education Inequality: “The key driver of economic inequality is the disintegration of trust between parents and the educational establishment.”
  • Social Media: “Social media algorithms are directly responsible for greater political polarization and the rise of authoritarianism.”
  • Crime and Society: “Crime tends to occur as a result of lack of opportunity, meaning greater job opportunities in disadvantaged areas will be the best approach for reducing crime rates in society.”
  • Immigration: “While immigration has caused some social tension throughout the past decades, it has on balance both enricheed the cultural fabric of society and increased overall prosperity.”
  • Environmental Sociology: “The environmental crisis, as a societal issue, is intrinsically linked with economic practices, consumption patterns, and power structures.”
  • Moral Panic: “The supposed threats posed by migrants is simply an example of moral panic that is experienced by every generation.”

for Nursing Topics

  • Palliative Care: “Palliative care is essential not only for the health of patients but as a moral imperative for a compassionate society.”
  • Patient Safety: “Governments should control, regulate, and police rising safety standards in healthcare institutions for the protection of the entire population.”
  • Bedside Manner: “The most important skill for a healthcare practitioner is the soft skill of compassion for patients.”
  • Nurse Shortages: “The current nursing shortage is not a result of an aging workforce but in fact a direct result of poor wages and workplace conditions.”
  • Mental Health Nursing: “Mental health nurses need to take on an educational role when it comes to changing societal beliefs about mental health conditions.”
  • Nursing Leadership: “Strong nursing leadership positively influences patient outcomes because it leads to a more cohesive team environment and more motivated staff.”
  • Evidence-based Practice : “Evidence-based practice in nursing should be at the center of a nurse’s activities, and nurses should consistently reflect on whether their beliefs are based on evidence or anecdote.”
  • Technology in Nursing: “The integration of technology in nursing, while increasing efficiency and accuracy, also raises ethical considerations regarding patient privacy and data security.”
  • Health Promotion: “Health promotion is a significant aspect of nursing practice, which empowers individuals to take control of their health and reduce health disparities.”
  • Cultural Competency: “Cultural competency in nursing is essential for ensuring people of diverse cultural backgrounds are willing to seek out help at early stages of illness.”
  • Nurse Burnout: “Nurse burnout, characterized by emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, is directly causing poorer outcomes for patients and, therefore, should be addressed as a social health concern rather than simply a workplace and wages dispute.”

for Education Topics

  • Standardized Testing: “Standardized testing should be immediately stopped due to its inability to accurately assess critical and creative thinking, and the amount of stress it causes among children.
  • Digital Learning: “Digital learning is a positive move in education because it opens the door to more differentiated and personalized learning experiences for children.”
  • Bilingual Education: “Bilingual education should be compulsory in all primary schools because it improves cognitive and social skills and also promotes cultural diversity and inclusion .
  • Teacher Training: “ Continuous professional development for teachers is essential for adapting to educational trends, improving teaching strategies , and ultimately improving educational outcomes.
  • School Starting Later: “A later start to school will allow teenagers to sleep in for longer, which in turn will lead to less fatigue and higher test scores.”
  • School Starting Earlier: “If school started earlier and ended earlier, students would have more daytime to engage in extracurricular activities, which will in-turn improve children’s holistic development.:
  • Four-Day School Week: “A four-day school week will allow for greater productivity while also allowing sufficient time for children to rest and recover during the 3-day weekends.”
  • Education Funding: “The disparity in education funding between low-income and affluent districts contributes to systemic inequities and is an explainer for diverging outcomes.”
  • Early Childhood Education: “The best way to improve overall outcomes (educational, health, and holistic) is to implement free and compulsory early childhood education from Age 3.”
  • Homework: “Homework is bad for student development because it prevents young people from pursuing hobbies, spending time outdoors, and recovering from long school days.”
  • Hidden Curriculum: “Schools should actively engage in a ‘hidden curriculum’ by promoting nationalistic values, obedience to authority, and interpersonal respect.”

for Business Studies Topics

  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Bad: “Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) gets in the way of efficient and productive business practices and, on balance, does little to improve social and environmental outcomes.”
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Good: “Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) should be mandatory for all businesses as it ensures humane practices within a capitalist framework.”
  • Business Ethics: “Ethical business practices is not only the moral behaior, but also good business practice, because it contributes to a positive brand reputation and can even allow a company to command a higher market rate for their goods and services.”
  • Entrepreneurship: “Entrepreneurship is the core of prosperity and job creation, and therefore, entrepreneurs should not face excessive taxes if they find success in the marketplace.”
  • Workplace Diversity: “Workplace diversity enhances business performance by fostering creativity, innovation, and broader perspectives, leading to improved problem-solving and decision-making.”
  • Marketing Strategy: “Digital marketing is the future of client acquisition because it allows for better targeting than traditional marketing strategies.”
  • Leadership Styles: “Transformational leadership is a superior leadership model to the great man theory because its focus is on the team rather than the leader.
  • Globalization: “The breaking-down of trade tariffs throughout the past 40 years has been the greatest driver of economic growth in all of human history.”
  • Supply Chain Management: “When a business reaches a certain size, its greatest opportunity for decreasing costs is through improving logistics and diversifying its supply chain.”
  • Environmental Stewardship: “All businesses carry a moral responsibility to strive toward a net positive impact on the environment.”

for Economics Topics

  • Financial Crisis: “The 2008 financial crisis, a result of lax regulation and risky financial practices, highlighted the need for a more robust and transparent financial system.”
  • Economic Impact of Climate Change: “Climate change should be addressed not only due to its potential social impact, but because it is the greatest long-term threat to current economic systems.”
  • Healthcare Economics: “While free markets are usually the best way to deliver goods and services, a universal healthcare model may in fact lead to lower costs due to the unique bureaucratic problems in open healthcare markets.”
  • Fiscal Policy: “Proactive fiscal policy plays a crucial role in stabilizing the economy during economic downturns and promoting long-term growth.”
  • Behavioral Economics: “Behavioral economics continues to be the most important branch of economics because it effectively explains how economic levers can cause widespread social change.”
  • Gig Economy: “The gig economy has had a positive effect on society because it allows all individuals to act as entrepreneurs, fill gaps in the market, and find work without having to apply for a job in a traditional company.”
  • Economics of Education: “Every dollar of education investment is worthwhile, because it pays strong dividends in terms of future economic output and social opportunities to all..”

for Communications and Journalism Topics

  • Social Media Good: “Social media platforms have had the greatest positive impact on democracy of any technology, because they allow for citizen journalism and skirting around the elite gatekeepers.”
  • Social Media Bad : “The spread of fake news in the digital age is the greatest threat to democracy, which is why schools need now more than ever to teach critical and logical thinking skills.”
  • Crisis Communication: “While crisis communication is not a skill needed every day in a communications job, when it is needed, it’s the most important skill for a communication studies major to have.”
  • Journalistic Ethics: “Anybody posting online, including on blogs or social media, should have the responsibility to follow journalistic ethics, including the obligation for truthfulness, fairness, and objectivity.”
  • Media Representation: “Media representation has historically been exclusionary, and as a result, large media companies carry a social responsibility to implement on-screen diversity quotas.”
  • Storytelling: “Above logical arguments (logos), storytelling and an appeal to emotions (pathos) is the most effective way to spread a message and convince an audience of an argument..”
  • Media Convergence: “Media convergence, characterized by the integration of different media platforms, is the greatest opportunity yet for media companies to reach a wide and diverse audience.”
  • Audience Capture: “While digital media has allowed for greater feedback from audiences, the phenomenon of audience capture (where broadcasters change their message to meet the desires of audience) is overall bad for truth in journalism.”
  • Freedom of the Press : “Freedom of the press is the most essential vehicle for ensuring a free and democratic society because it allows for a fully-informed citizenry.”
  • Groupthink : “Social media leads to greater amounts of group think than traditional mass media ever did.

for History Topics

  • Treaty of Versailles: “If the Treaty of Versailles set the conditions for WWII, then the main lesson from the Treaty was that the victors should be graceful in their victory and focus on shared reconstruction rather than excessive punishment.”
  • Civil Rights Movement: “The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s led to the greatest and most rapid expansion of access to natural rights in human history.”
  • Fall of the Roman Empire: “The fall of the Roman Empire was a complex event influenced by a confluence of factors, including political instability, economic crisis, and external invasions.”
  • Lessons from History: “While history does not repeat, it does rhyme.”
  • Colonialism: “The effects of colonialism are still felt today in colonized nations, and reparations should be made.”
  • Technology: “History shows that technological inventions tend to be the catalysts for rapid social change .”

for Engineering Topics

  • Renewable Energy Technologies: “Climate change cannot be solved by taxation, but must be solved by renewable energy innovations.”
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Engineering: “The integration of artificial intelligence in engineering will help to significantly optimize design processes, leading to more affordable and higher-quality engineering products.”
  • Bioengineering: “Bioengineering will dramatically improve both the length and quality of life in the next 30 years.”
  • Engineering Ethics: “Engineering ethics, which encompass responsibility, integrity, and respect for the public and the environment, are integral for ensuring the safety and well-being of society.”
  • Structural Engineering: “In the face of increasing climate change threats, structural engineering must adapt to incorporate resilience against natural disasters in infrastructure design.”

Checklist: How to use your Thesis Statement

✅ Position: A thesis statement takes a clear stance on a topic, presenting an argument rather than just stating a fact. ✅ Specificity: It addresses a specific aspect of the topic, providing focus for the essay. ✅ Conciseness: Typically, a thesis statement is one to two sentences long. It should be concise, clear, and easily identifiable. ✅ Arguable: The claim made in a thesis statement should be something that could be disagreed with or debated. ✅ Direction: The thesis statement guides the direction of the essay, providing a roadmap for the argument. ✅ Evidence-based: While the thesis statement itself doesn’t include evidence, it sets up an argument that can be supported with evidence in the body of the essay. ✅ Placement: Generally, the thesis statement is placed at the end of the introduction of an essay.

There’s a lot to think about when coming up with your thesis statement. If you can’t come up with one yet, and you know the topic you need to cover, I’d recommend doing some background reading on the topic and let the data inform your thesis (which is how the true academic researchers do it!). If you’re writing an academic dissertation, you’d want to come up with the thesis statement after you have conducted your literature review. And for that, read my guide on literature reviews.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 31 Great Teachable Moment Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ SOLO Taxonomy - 5 Levels of Learning Complexity
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ Remedial Education - Advantages, Disadvantages & Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ What is Hidden Curriculum? - Examples, Pros & Cons

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  • Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process . It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to your field.

Generally, an outline contains information on the different sections included in your thesis or dissertation , such as:

  • Your anticipated title
  • Your abstract
  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review, research methods, avenues for future research, etc.)

In the final product, you can also provide a chapter outline for your readers. This is a short paragraph at the end of your introduction to inform readers about the organizational structure of your thesis or dissertation. This chapter outline is also known as a reading guide or summary outline.

Table of contents

How to outline your thesis or dissertation, dissertation and thesis outline templates, chapter outline example, sample sentences for your chapter outline, sample verbs for variation in your chapter outline, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis and dissertation outlines.

While there are some inter-institutional differences, many outlines proceed in a fairly similar fashion.

  • Working Title
  • “Elevator pitch” of your work (often written last).
  • Introduce your area of study, sharing details about your research question, problem statement , and hypotheses . Situate your research within an existing paradigm or conceptual or theoretical framework .
  • Subdivide as you see fit into main topics and sub-topics.
  • Describe your research methods (e.g., your scope , population , and data collection ).
  • Present your research findings and share about your data analysis methods.
  • Answer the research question in a concise way.
  • Interpret your findings, discuss potential limitations of your own research and speculate about future implications or related opportunities.

For a more detailed overview of chapters and other elements, be sure to check out our article on the structure of a dissertation or download our template .

To help you get started, we’ve created a full thesis or dissertation template in Word or Google Docs format. It’s easy adapt it to your own requirements.

 Download Word template    Download Google Docs template

Chapter outline example American English

It can be easy to fall into a pattern of overusing the same words or sentence constructions, which can make your work monotonous and repetitive for your readers. Consider utilizing some of the alternative constructions presented below.

Example 1: Passive construction

The passive voice is a common choice for outlines and overviews because the context makes it clear who is carrying out the action (e.g., you are conducting the research ). However, overuse of the passive voice can make your text vague and imprecise.

Example 2: IS-AV construction

You can also present your information using the “IS-AV” (inanimate subject with an active verb ) construction.

A chapter is an inanimate object, so it is not capable of taking an action itself (e.g., presenting or discussing). However, the meaning of the sentence is still easily understandable, so the IS-AV construction can be a good way to add variety to your text.

Example 3: The “I” construction

Another option is to use the “I” construction, which is often recommended by style manuals (e.g., APA Style and Chicago style ). However, depending on your field of study, this construction is not always considered professional or academic. Ask your supervisor if you’re not sure.

Example 4: Mix-and-match

To truly make the most of these options, consider mixing and matching the passive voice , IS-AV construction , and “I” construction .This can help the flow of your argument and improve the readability of your text.

As you draft the chapter outline, you may also find yourself frequently repeating the same words, such as “discuss,” “present,” “prove,” or “show.” Consider branching out to add richness and nuance to your writing. Here are some examples of synonyms you can use.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or research bias, make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

Research bias

  • Anchoring bias
  • Halo effect
  • The Baader–Meinhof phenomenon
  • The placebo effect
  • Nonresponse bias
  • Deep learning
  • Generative AI
  • Machine learning
  • Reinforcement learning
  • Supervised vs. unsupervised learning

 (AI) Tools

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When you mention different chapters within your text, it’s considered best to use Roman numerals for most citation styles. However, the most important thing here is to remain consistent whenever using numbers in your dissertation .

The title page of your thesis or dissertation goes first, before all other content or lists that you may choose to include.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical first steps in your writing process. It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding what kind of research you’d like to undertake.

  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review , research methods , avenues for future research, etc.)

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

George, T. (2023, November 21). Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Scribbr. Retrieved January 8, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/dissertation/dissertation-thesis-outline/

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Thesis Sentence Examples, How to Write, Tips

thesis sentence exam

What is the Thesis Sentence? – Definition

What is the best example of a thesis sentence, 100 thesis sentence examples.

thesis sentence examples

  • Electric vehicles have the potential to drastically reduce carbon emissions, leading us toward a sustainable future.
  • Online education offers unparalleled flexibility but lacks the personal touch of traditional classroom settings.
  • Globalization brings economic growth; however, it also exacerbates income inequalities within countries.
  • Artificial intelligence poses both opportunities for efficiency and ethical dilemmas in decision-making processes.
  • Childhood obesity is a growing concern, directly linked to sedentary lifestyles and processed food consumption.
  • Mental health awareness needs greater emphasis in schools to combat rising cases of student depression.
  • Space exploration provides not just scientific advancement but also unifies humanity in exploration.
  • Modern architecture reflects a blend of functionality and aesthetics, representing societal values.
  • Organic farming promises a sustainable solution to the environmental crises caused by conventional agricultural practices.
  • Music therapy can play a pivotal role in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders.
  • Virtual reality transforms not only gaming but also medical training and therapy.
  • Renewable energy sources are the key to addressing the looming global energy crisis.
  • Animal testing is an ethically contentious issue, with alternatives emerging in recent scientific advancements.
  • Social media platforms influence public opinion more powerfully than traditional media.
  • Remote work culture has its merits in work-life balance but can erode team cohesion.
  • Digital currencies represent the future of trade, though they introduce new regulatory challenges.
  • Youth sports contribute not only to physical health but also to discipline and teamwork skills.
  • Urban green spaces are essential for mental health, biodiversity, and counteracting pollution in cities.
  • E-commerce has revolutionized shopping, yet it poses challenges to brick-and-mortar stores and local economies.
  • Cultural exchange programs promote global unity and understanding, dismantling stereotypes.
  • Preservation of indigenous languages is crucial for maintaining cultural heritage and diversity.
  • The gig economy provides flexibility for workers but often lacks job security and benefits.
  • Online privacy is endangered by the rise of data breaches and surveillance capitalism.
  • Children’s exposure to screens impacts cognitive development and necessitates stricter parental controls.
  • Nuclear energy remains a double-edged sword: a potent energy source but with disposal concerns.
  • Modern tourism threatens historical sites but boosts local economies.
  • Adopting pets from shelters can help reduce the stray animal crisis and promotes humane treatment.
  • Mindfulness meditation reduces stress levels and has potential applications in clinical therapy.
  • Fast fashion contributes to environmental degradation, advocating for sustainable consumption.
  • Artificial sweeteners , while calorie-free, may have unforeseen health impacts.
  • Urban farming holds the promise of food sustainability in densely populated cities.
  • Mandatory voting laws could increase political participation but question voluntary democratic engagement.
  • Homeschooling offers personalized education but might limit social interactions.
  • Antibiotic resistance is a burgeoning global crisis spurred by over-prescription and misuse.
  • Gender-neutral parenting challenges traditional norms and fosters an inclusive environment.
  • Augmented reality will reshape education, making it more interactive and immersive.
  • Binge-watching culture is reshaping entertainment consumption and impacts mental health.
  • Marine conservation zones protect biodiversity and ensure sustainable fishing practices.
  • Intermittent fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, including cognitive and cardiac improvements.
  • Digital detox retreats answer the modern need to disconnect and recharge mentally.
  • Museums in the digital age must evolve to remain relevant and engage younger generations.
  • Public transport investments reduce urban congestion and carbon footprints.
  • Plant-based diets mitigate environmental degradation and promote holistic health.
  • Consumer data collection straddles the line between business intelligence and privacy invasion.
  • Urban vertical gardens can revolutionize urban agriculture and combat pollution.
  • Telemedicine is revolutionizing healthcare access, especially in remote areas.
  • Biodegradable packaging is the future of sustainability in the retail industry.
  • Microfinancing empowers grassroots entrepreneurs, especially in developing countries.
  • Language learning apps are democratizing education but cannot replace traditional methods entirely.
  • Carpooling and ride-sharing reduce urban emissions and promote a shared economy.
  • Theaters in the digital age face challenges from streaming platforms but offer a unique experience.
  • 3D printing will revolutionize manufacturing, reducing waste and speeding production.
  • Sleep’s role is underestimated in cognitive function and overall health.
  • Ocean cleanup initiatives combat the plastic crisis but require global cooperation.
  • Gamified learning platforms enhance student engagement and retention.
  • Blockchain technology offers secure data management but is energy-consuming and requires widespread adoption.
  • Historical fiction novels blend factual events with imaginative storytelling, enhancing both education and entertainment.
  • Zero waste initiatives promote sustainable living, combating the throwaway culture of modern society.
  • Telecommuting benefits the environment and worker satisfaction, but challenges team dynamics.
  • Green architecture is the intersection of design and sustainability, making it vital for future urban planning.
  • Astronomical tourism opens the wonders of the universe but requires careful management to protect natural nightscapes.
  • The rise of audiobooks redefines reading, making literature accessible in our multitasking age.
  • Gene editing techniques hold promise for medical breakthroughs, yet they introduce ethical dilemmas.
  • Agroforestry practices enhance biodiversity, soil health, and offer economic benefits to farmers.
  • Veganism goes beyond diet; it’s an ethical stance against animal exploitation.
  • Cloud computing streamlines data storage but introduces security concerns.
  • Holistic medicine integrates mind and body healing, challenging conventional medical paradigms.
  • Subscription-based business models resonate with modern consumers, ensuring steady revenue for businesses.
  • Cultural immersion travel deepens understanding, combating shallow tourist experiences.
  • Biometrics is revolutionizing security, yet poses personal privacy risks.
  • Freelance economies offer freedom and flexibility, contrasting the stability of traditional job markets.
  • Biodiversity conservation is essential for ecosystem stability and the survival of humanity.
  • Mental health days acknowledge the importance of psychological well-being in the workplace.
  • Solar power technology is rapidly advancing, making it a feasible replacement for fossil fuels.
  • Civic education is crucial in fostering informed and active citizens in democracies.
  • Edible insect consumption addresses food sustainability and introduces new culinary experiences.
  • Urban beekeeping supports declining bee populations and promotes local food production.
  • Mobile health apps enhance personal health management but require stringent data protection measures.
  • Trade school education is equally valuable as traditional college degrees, offering practical skills.
  • Elderly care robots alleviate human caregiver burdens but prompt questions about emotional connections.
  • Second language acquisition enriches cognitive abilities and cultural understanding.
  • Craftsmanship in the digital age celebrates hands-on creation amidst automated mass production.
  • Ocean wave energy conversion is a promising, untapped sustainable energy resource.
  • Diverse representation in media is essential for societal inclusivity and combating stereotypes.
  • Microplastics in water sources pose severe environmental and health concerns.
  • Fair trade products support ethical consumerism and uplift marginalized producers.
  • Hybrid learning models combine online and offline methods, optimizing educational outcomes.
  • Multi-generational households foster family bonding but present unique challenges.
  • Urban rewilding projects revitalize natural habitats in cityscapes, supporting biodiversity.
  • Digital art forms elevate traditional art through technology, yet spark debates on authenticity.
  • Food forest initiatives enhance sustainable agriculture, merging productivity with ecosystem health.
  • Biophilic design in offices boosts worker productivity and well-being.
  • Rainwater harvesting is a sustainable solution to global water scarcity issues.
  • Paperless offices reduce environmental impact and increase organizational efficiency.
  • Drama therapy offers transformative healing, using performance as a therapeutic tool.
  • Ethical AI development balances technological advancement with humane considerations.
  • Micro-adventures encourage local exploration, redefining the concept of travel.
  • Refurbishing old buildings preserves historical heritage and is environmentally responsible.
  • Inclusive toy designs reflect diverse societies, promoting acceptance from a young age.
  • Afforestation projects combat deforestation, sequester carbon, and restore habitats.

Thesis Sentence Examples for Essay

  • Climatic changes influence biodiversity, challenging ecosystems worldwide.
  • Digital currencies have revolutionized the global financial system, making transactions more transparent.
  • Remote working is a viable alternative to traditional office environments, promoting flexibility.
  • Ancient civilizations left imprints on modern cultures, influencing art, politics, and philosophy.
  • E-learning platforms provide democratized education, making knowledge accessible to all.
  • Artificial intelligence is redefining industries, enhancing efficiency, and customer experiences.
  • Organic farming supports sustainable agriculture, providing healthier produce options.
  • Sports and physical activities contribute to improved mental health and overall well-being.
  • Alternative energy sources are the key to addressing global warming and ensuring sustainable energy.
  • The role of media is pivotal in shaping public opinion, especially in this digital age.

Thesis Sentence Examples for High School

  • Uniforms in schools promote equality among students, reducing social discriminations.
  • Extracurricular activities enhance the overall development of high school students.
  • Advanced technology has reshaped classroom dynamics, promoting interactive learning.
  • Peer pressure in high schools plays a significant role in shaping teenagers’ personalities.
  • Summer vacations provide students with a break, enhancing productivity during academic years.
  • Counseling sessions in schools benefit students, addressing their emotional and academic needs.
  • School libraries encourage reading habits, supporting comprehensive learning.
  • Health education should be a mandatory part of the high school curriculum.
  • Bullying in schools affects students’ mental health, necessitating strict preventive measures.
  • Homework assignments reinforce classroom teachings, ensuring better understanding.

Thesis Sentence Starter Examples

  • Given the rising pollution, eco-friendly vehicles are the need of the hour.
  • In the realm of literature, Shakespeare’s works stand unmatched in their depth.
  • Considering the health benefits, regular exercise should be a daily routine for everyone.
  • Amidst technological advancements, preserving privacy is paramount.
  • With the surge in online communication, face-to-face interactions remain invaluable.
  • Observing the economic patterns, sustainable business models prove more beneficial long-term.
  • Facing the challenge of global warming, renewable energy sources become indispensable.
  • Through centuries of art evolution, Renaissance art holds a special place in history.
  • Given the prevalence of mental health issues, therapy and counseling are essential services.
  • In light of recent events, community building becomes vital for societal progress.

How do you start a thesis sentence?

  • Understand the Question: Before diving in, understand the essay prompt or research question thoroughly. Knowing the question helps you tailor the thesis effectively.
  • Brainstorm: Jot down initial ideas that come to mind. This rough list can be refined later.
  • Narrow Down: Ensure your thesis focuses on a specific aspect instead of being overly broad. For instance, instead of “Eating vegetables is good,” specify why and how, like “Eating leafy greens aids digestion due to their high fiber content.”
  • Take a Stand: A thesis isn’t just a statement; it often presents an argument. Make sure you’re presenting a perspective or an opinion.
  • Be Clear and Concise: Avoid jargon and complicated sentences. Keep it direct and to the point.
  • Avoid Clichés and Generalizations: Using worn-out phrases or overly generalized statements weakens your thesis.
  • Ensure it’s Debatable: An effective thesis often presents an argument that could be challenged. For instance, “Social media affects mental health” is more debatable than “The earth revolves around the sun.”
  • Revise and Refine: After drafting, revisit your thesis. Can it be clearer or more concise? Does it thoroughly represent what your essay will discuss?
  • Seek Feedback: Sharing your thesis with peers or mentors can provide valuable insights.
  • Position Appropriately: Typically, the thesis is placed at the end of the introduction, setting the stage for the rest of the essay.

What is a thesis sentence in an essay?

  • Specificity: It pinpoints the main topic of your essay, avoiding vague generalizations.
  • Assertiveness: It takes a clear stance or position on the topic.
  • Relevance: It sets the tone and direction for the entire essay, ensuring that readers know what to expect.
  • Debatable Nature: Good thesis sentences can be argued, offering a perspective or viewpoint on a subject.
  • Clarity: It’s articulated in clear and straightforward language.
  • Conciseness: It’s typically just one or two sentences long, no matter how complex the topic might be.
  • Guide for the Reader: Think of it as a map or guidepost for your readers, giving them a clear idea of what the essay will discuss.

How do you write a Thesis Sentence? – Step by Step Guide

  • Research Your Topic: Before you can form an opinion or argument, you need to have a clear understanding of your topic. Dive into trusted resources and gather information.
  • Understand the Prompt: If you’re writing an essay based on a prompt, make sure you fully grasp what’s being asked.
  • Brainstorm Ideas: Note down any thoughts, perspectives, or arguments related to your topic. This brainstorming can form the foundation of your thesis.
  • Narrow Your Focus: A good thesis is specific and to the point. Narrow down your topic to a specific aspect that you want to focus on.
  • Formulate an Opinion: Your thesis should not just state a fact. It should convey an opinion or take a stance on an issue.
  • Use Clear and Concise Language: Avoid complex jargon or overly long sentences. Your thesis should be understandable to a broad audience.
  • Ensure It’s Debatable: Your thesis should present a claim or argument that others could reasonably dispute.
  • Position Properly: Typically, your thesis sentence should be placed at the end of your essay’s introductory paragraph.
  • Revise and Refine: Don’t hesitate to revisit and tweak your thesis as your essay evolves. Sometimes, as you write and explore your topic further, your thesis might need adjustment.
  • Seek Feedback: Have peers or instructors review your thesis sentence. They might offer invaluable insights or ways to strengthen it.

Tips for Using Thesis Sentences

  • Stay Consistent: Ensure that your essay remains consistent with your thesis. Each paragraph should contribute to or elaborate on the argument or claim you’ve made.
  • Avoid Generalizations: Phrases like “Everyone knows,” “Since the beginning of time,” or “All people think” tend to weaken your thesis. Stick to specifics.
  • Steer Clear of Clichés: Originality strengthens your thesis. Relying on clichéd phrases or ideas can dilute its impact.
  • Stay Flexible: As you delve deeper into writing your essay, you might find more relevant points that can make your thesis even stronger. Don’t be rigid; be ready to adjust your thesis if needed.
  • Use Strong Language: Words like “might,” “maybe,” “perhaps,” can make your thesis sound uncertain. Choose assertive language to convey confidence in your argument.
  • Support Your Thesis: Throughout your essay, continuously provide evidence and examples that back up the claim made in your thesis.
  • Reiterate Your Thesis: In your conclusion, restate your thesis (though not verbatim) to remind readers of your main argument as you wrap up your essay.

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  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement: Fill-in-the-Blank Formula

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  2. How to Write a Good Thesis Statement

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  3. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  4. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  5. What Is The Thesis Statement? Examples of Thesis Statements

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  6. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

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VIDEO

  1. How to Write Thesis? Thesis Writing Tips #thesis #shorts #assignment

  2. Thesis Statement vs Topic Sentence I Learn Essay Writing I #essay #paragraph #css #learnwriting

  3. Demo of Thesis Statement

  4. Thesis Defense Group I

  5. Thesis statements and topic sentences

  6. How to Write a Short, In-Class Essay, Definition, ENC 1101, Miami Dade College

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Essay How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan. A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay. It usually comes near the end of your introduction.

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    A thesis statement is a sentence in a paper or essay (in the opening paragraph) that introduces the main topic to the reader. As one of the first things your reader sees, your thesis statement is one of the most important sentences in your entire paper—but also one of the hardest to write!

  3. Creating a Thesis Statement, Thesis Statement Tips

    1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience. An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.

  4. Developing a Thesis Statement

    A thesis statement . . . Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic. Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper. Is focused and specific enough to be "proven" within the boundaries of your paper.

  5. Thesis Statements

    directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel. makes a claim that others might dispute.

  6. Writing a Thesis Statement

    Argumentative Thesis Statement: Making a Claim Analytical Thesis Statement: Analyzing an Issue Expository Thesis Statement: Explaining a Topic Related Video Tutorials Still Confused? Please reach out to your instructor or email the Writing Center for assistance! Get Help

  7. What Is a Thesis?

    What Is a Thesis? | Ultimate Guide & Examples Published on September 14, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023. A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master's program or a capstone to a bachelor's degree. Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience.

  8. PDF Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences

    •A thesis statement can appear as one sentence (see examples C and D) or several sentences (see examples A and B); this is dependent on the requirements of your rhetorical context. ** Note: these are general guidelines for constructing a strong thesis statement and topic sentences in a thesis driven essay; always refer to your assignment or ...

  9. How to Format a Thesis for a Research Paper

    Write with Grammarly What is a thesis statement in a research paper? A thesis statement is a single sentence in a research paper that plainly and succinctly explains the main point the research attempts to prove. For example, if you were researching the effects of exercise on stress, your thesis statement might be:

  10. How to write a thesis statement + Examples

    A good thesis statement needs to do the following: Condense the main idea of your thesis into one or two sentences. Answer your project's main research question. Clearly state your position in relation to the topic. Make an argument that requires support or evidence.

  11. Thesis statement: Tips and Examples

    A thesis statement is a declarative sentence that states the primary idea of an essay or a research paper. In this statement, the authors declare their beliefs or what they intend to argue in their research study. The statement is clear and concise, with only one or two sentences. Thesis Statement — An Essential in Thesis Writing

  12. 25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

    For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute. An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic. Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's cuteness is derived from its floppy ears, small body, and playfulness."

  13. Strong Thesis Statements

    Example of a debatable thesis statement: At least 25 percent of the federal budget should be spent on limiting pollution. This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money.

  14. Thesis Statement Examples

    Here are six more thesis statement examples for you to consider: Bad: Everyone should exercise. - Why should I? What's in it for me? Good: Americans should add exercise to their daily morning routine because it not only keeps their bodies at a healthy weight but also reduces the risk of high blood pressure.

  15. Thesis

    Here are some examples of possible thesis statements for a student's analysis of the article "The Case Against Perfection" by Professor Michael Sandel. Descriptive thesis (not arguable)

  16. The Thesis Sentence

    The promises that a thesis sentence makes to a reader are important ones and must be kept. It's helpful sometimes to explain the thesis as a kind of contract between reader and writer: if this contract is broken, the reader will feel frustrated and betrayed. Accordingly, the writer must be very careful in the development of the thesis.

  17. Mastering the Thesis Statement: Examples and Tips for Academic ...

    A thesis statement is a sentence that encapsulates the central point or main idea of a paper or essay. It is typically found near the end of the introduction and serves as a guide to the reader, outlining the writer's stance on the topic. ... Examples of Thesis Statements in Different Essay Types Narrative. In a narrative essay, the thesis ...

  18. 15 Thesis Statement Examples to Inspire Your Next Argumentative ...

    1. A good argumentative thesis is focused and not too broad. It's important to stay focused! Don't try to argue an overly broad topic in your essay, or you're going to feel confused and unsure about your direction and purpose. Don't write: "Eating fast food is bad and should be avoided."

  19. 101 Thesis Statement Examples (2024)

    Checklist: How to use your Thesis Statement. Position: A thesis statement takes a clear stance on a topic, presenting an argument rather than just stating a fact. Specificity: It addresses a specific aspect of the topic, providing focus for the essay. Conciseness: Typically, a thesis statement is one to two sentences long.It should be concise, clear, and easily identifiable.

  20. Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples

    Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples. Published on September 9, 2022 by Tegan George.Revised on July 18, 2023. It can be difficult to know where to start when writing your thesis or dissertation.One way to come up with some ideas or maybe even combat writer's block is to check out previous work done by other students on a similar thesis or dissertation topic to yours.

  21. How to write a thesis statement (with examples)

    To answer that, let's think about what 'thesis' means. From the Greek thésis, meaning 'proposition', your thesis is your main argument. It is the position you have to support and defend for the remainder of your essay.

  22. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    You can find a thesis and dissertation outline template below, as well as a chapter outline example, and example sentences and words. Table of contents How to outline your thesis or dissertation Dissertation and thesis outline templates Chapter outline example Sample sentences for your chapter outline

  23. 100+ Thesis Sentence Examples, How to Write, Tips

    Thesis Sentence Examples, How to Write, Tips Embarking on academic writing or preparing a pivotal argument for your essay? The heart of your piece lies in its thesis sentence. A succinct, powerful statement, the thesis guides readers, setting the tone for what's to come.