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Letter of Introduction Examples and Writing Tips

resume letter of introduction template

Types of Introduction Letters

Tips for writing a letter of introduction, letter of introduction examples, letter introducing two people, letter introducing yourself, more introduction letter examples, related types of letters.

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Do you need to write a letter introducing yourself to a prospective employer, a networking contact, or a potential new client? A well-written letter of introduction can result in a valuable relationship, and help you find a new job or acquire a new client. Learn why and how to send a letter, email, or LinkedIn message introducing yourself, so that you can make the best possible impression on the reader.

Surveys report that 70% to 80% (some even as high as 85%) of job seekers say that networking has helped them find a new job. However, this doesn’t mean that every networking success story involves a direct connection. Sometimes, it’s less about who you know, and more about who your friends know. A letter of introduction is one way to forge a new connection.

There are two types of letters of introduction.

  • In the first type, you introduce a connection to someone else you know . That someone might be a potential candidate for employment, or someone looking for career assistance.
  • In the other type of letter of introduction, you write to someone you haven’t met . You introduce yourself to ask them for a  job referral  or  request assistance with a job search .

A letter of introduction can be a useful way to network and gain job search advice, or even possibly a job opportunity.

The most important tip to remember when writing a letter of introduction is to keep it short and to the point. The person you are contacting is a busy professional, and you want to get his or her attention right away.

Use a Professional Tone

When writing your letter, make sure the tone matches your relationship. If you are close friends, you can write in a slightly less formal style. However, if you are introducing yourself for the first time, make sure your letter is extremely professional.

Mention Who You're Introducing

First, include a quick introduction that explains who you are, or a short synopsis of the person you are introducing.

Explain Why You're Writing

Then, briefly describe what you would like to accomplish by sending your letter. Does the other person wish to apply for a job opening? Are you hoping to set up an  informational interview  for yourself? Be as clear as possible.

Share Your Contact Information

Conclude with a description of how the recipient of the letter can either get in touch with you or the third party. Make it as easy as possible for the recipient to respond.

Proofread and Edit

Whether or not you are already acquainted, be sure to thoroughly edit and proofread your letter before sending it.

In many cases, the letter can be sent via email, because that's the quickest and easiest way to connect.

This is a letter of introduction example for introducing two people. Download the letter of introduction template (compatible with Google Docs and Word) or see below for more examples.

The Balance

This letter is written as an introduction to connect two people, and is typically sent to someone you know well.

Letter of Introduction Example: Introducing Two People

Barbara Nygaard 123 Main Street Anytown, CA 12345 555-212-1234 barbara.nygaard@email.com

April 11, 2022

Bob Smith Talent Evaluation Acme Recruiting 123 Business Rd. Business City, NY 54321

I'm writing to introduce you to Janice Dolan, who I have the pleasure of being acquainted with through the Brandon Theater Group. I am the Technical Director for the group, as you know, and I have worked with Janice on several local theater projects. She is a terrific stage manager with over ten years of experience.

Janice is interested in relocating to the San Francisco area in the near future and would appreciate any recommendations you could offer her for conducting a job search for a theater position and any help you can provide with the logistics of relocating to California.

I've attached her resume for your review, and you can contact her at janicedolan@email.com or 555-555-5555. Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Barbara Nygaard

This letter is an example of a letter written to introduce yourself.

Letter of Introduction Example Introducing Yourself

Subject: Introduction From Katherine Sussman

Dear Mr. Randall,

My name is Katherine Sussman, and I am currently a recruitment associate for XYZ Recruiting. I have been working as a recruiter for the past three years.

I am interested in moving from recruitment work in a large corporation to internal recruitment for a nonprofit. I used to work in development for ABC Nonprofit and would love to bring my current skills to a similar nonprofit. I know you do this kind of work for Sunshine Nonprofit, and I would appreciate hearing a bit about your experience in this field. I would love to arrange a time to meet with you for an informational interview.

I have attached my resume for your review. If you have time for a brief conversation, please let me know. You can contact me via email (ksussman@email.com) or phone (555-555-5555). I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you so much.

Katherine Sussman

Here's more information on introducing yourself, including how to introduce yourself in an email, and tips for saying thank you for an introduction.

  • How to Introduce Yourself in an Email
  • Sample Thank-You Letter for an Introduction
  • Tips for Writing a Letter Requesting Career Advice

People often confuse a letter of introduction with other types of job search letters:

A cover letter is a document sent with your resume and other job application materials. Your cover letter serves as an introduction to your resume. Sometimes, you’ll mention a referral from a mutual acquaintance who told you about the job or passed on the hiring manager’s name. The letter explains why you are qualified for the specific job for which you are applying.

A referral letter is a letter you write to someone you don’t know following a lead by a mutual acquaintance. In the letter, you would begin by mentioning your common contact, and then make your request—perhaps you are applying to a job they have available, or you are looking to conduct an informational interview or learn about career opportunities.

A letter of recommendation is a letter written by someone who is familiar with your academic work or your job skills and can endorse your candidacy for a position. The letter would be addressed to the admission officer, department head, or hiring manager, and would include specific skills and experiences that highlight your suitability for the position you’re applying to.

Key Takeaways

  • A letter of introduction can forge a new connection. Use these letters to introduce yourself to a potential new client or employer, or to do the same for one of your contacts.
  • Keep your letter concise and to the point. The reader is a busy professional. State your purpose early on.
  • Consider sending your introduction via email. If time is of the essence, emailing your note can help make an introduction quickly.
  • Edit and proofread before sending. Even if you know the recipient well, make sure your letter is perfect before you mail or send it.

PayScale. " How Many Jobs Are Found Through Networking, Really ?"

How To Write A Letter Of Introduction For Job Seekers (Samples Included)

Jeff Gillis 0 Comments

letter of introduction

By Jeff Gillis

Updated 6/14/2022.

For many job seekers, nothing’s more frustrating than the words, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.”

What if you don’t know anyone? Perhaps you’ve moved to a new city, switched industries, or simply didn’t recognize the importance of networking until recently. How can talented individuals in this situation play catch-up and get their careers started?

It isn’t impossible, and you don’t have to be obnoxious to get in front of the right people. In fact, there’s an entire method for introducing yourself to people you’ve never met but would like to know. It’s called sending a Letter of Introduction.

What Exactly Is a Letter of Introduction?

So, what is a letter of introduction? A letter of introduction is, according to Military One Source , correspondence that “notifies an employer of your qualifications and interest to be considered for potential future positions.”

However, it can also be more. For example, you could send a letter of introduction to a potential new network contact, allowing you to expand your circle.

Essentially, the letter of introduction is a way to reach out to someone asking to make their acquaintance and, if they’re willing, find out about job opportunities or forge new connections in your desired industry. It’s a polite way to get your name in front of important people without infringing on their time or accosting them in a coffee shop.

It’s also important to understand what an introduction letter is not. It isn’t your resume , it’s not a cover letter , and it’s not a short story detailing your early life, dreams, and ambitions. You don’t send one in response to a current job posting.

Instead, it’s a brief, clear, and concise explanation of who you are as a professional and why you are writing. This reason could be that you’re looking for a job, or you’re hoping to chat with them to gain some insight into the industry you wish to enter.

Types of Introduction Letters

An introduction letter can be used to introduce yourself to someone new or to introduce a friend or colleague to someone you know. Introduction letters are either formal or informal. Typically speaking, an informal introduction letter is used in the second case where Person A is introducing Person B to Person C.

How to Write the Different Kinds of Letters of Introduction

Writing an informal introduction letter to introduce someone to a third party is rather simple. Since you know the person you’re introducing them to, you can rely on your own judgment when choosing your wording. For this article, we’ll focus on a relatively formal letter, even if it’s to a colleague. Such a letter should include the following features:

  • An explanation of why you’re writing
  • A brief description of who you’re introducing them to, relevant details like their job, and how you personally know them
  • A few lines on what that person needs (i.e., advice on entering the tech world with a finance background) and why you thought your colleague would be a useful resource
  • The job seeker’s contact information, ideally both their telephone number and email address

Today, most people send letters of introduction via email. Be mindful of how you send that email. For instance, there’s a difference between sending a letter of introduction and a referral letter.

Let’s say your friend needs a freelance copywriter. You worked with a great copywriter previously, and you tell your friend you’ll send their details.

In this case, you’re mainly sending a referral, as you’re connecting a professional connection to a friend with a specific need. While this is an amazing thing to do – as 72 percent of interviews are referrals – it isn’t the same as a letter of introduction.

Now, let’s change the circumstances a bit. In this scenario, let’s pretend your friend owns a copywriting agency.

Your professional connection is looking for a full-time gig and asks you to introduce them to someone who works in an agency. When you send the message out, you aren’t referring your professional contact for a specific opening. Instead, you’re letting your friend know a bit about who they are and providing contact details that allow your friend to reach out to your professional connection if they so choose. That’s an introduction letter.

When writing a letter of introduction for yourself, the steps are almost identical with a few subtle differences:

  • Dive right into who you are and what you do
  • Include a few lines about why you’re writing to them and specific details about what you’d like from them, like industry insights or information on job opportunities.
  • Provide information on how they can reach you, how you look forward to speaking with them, and a thank you for their time
  • End with a respectful sign-off

Letter of Introduction Samples

In some cases, it’s far easier to see how to approach a situation by checking out a few examples. Here is a sample letter of introduction for when you’re writing on behalf of someone else and another for when you’re writing on behalf of yourself:

Introductory Letter on Behalf of Someone Else

Hi Jane Doe, It was a pleasure catching up with you at the networking event last week! I’d like to take a moment to introduce you to John Smith, a project manager with nearly a decade of experience, specifically in the technology niche. I’ve personally worked with him several times during his time with ABC Corp, and I’ve grown to trust his expertise over the years. Currently, John is exploring new opportunities and was hoping to connect with you about potential future openings at your company. I’ve attached his resume for you to review, and you can also find him on LinkedIn using the link in that document. If you’d like to touch base by phone, you can contact him at 555-555-5555. While I’m not aware of any current hiring needs on your end, I do believe John would be an asset. Sincerely, James

Introductory Letter on Behalf of Yourself

Dear John Doe, My name is Jane Smith, and I’m a marketing manager with ten years of experience in the field, focused mainly on the food and beverage space. I’ve long been a fan of your company – XYZ Inc. – particularly its recent campaign for leading snack food manufacturer ABC Co. If you have the time, I would love to talk to you about opportunities with your company, as well as gain career insights from a leader in the field, such as yourself. If you’re available, I can be reached at 555-555-5555. You can also reply to this email and view my portfolio using the link in my signature. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you. Best, Jane Smith

These are rather formal examples of an introductory letter, focusing on professionals in the project management niche. Additionally, they’re relatively simple, showing you the general structure to follow.

In some cases, you could expand on various points based on the nuances of the company and what the job seeker has to offer. However, it’s crucial to keep things concise. Now isn’t the time to tell someone’s life story. Instead, the goal is to make an initial connection that can be built upon later.

It’s also true that less formal letters sometimes work. However, you don’t want to run the risk of alienating someone you don’t know with what feels like a gimmick or a sales letter. That’s why formal is often the way to go, regardless of whether you’re introducing yourself or someone else.

Use these examples as a letter of introduction template, giving you a solid starting point. Then, adjust the details as needed to ensure it makes the best possible impression.

Putting It All Together

A letter of introduction allows you to even the playing field when it comes to the game of “who knows who.” If you can dedicate time to send a letter (or email) of introduction each week to people you’d like to meet, a certain percentage will likely reply back – so long as you don’t simply cut and paste the same letter for everyone.

Whether it’s to land a new job or break into a new industry, take advantage of the power of introductory letters.

resume letter of introduction template

Co-founder and CTO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Jeff is a featured contributor delivering advice on job search, job interviews and career advancement, having published more than 50 pieces of unique content on the site , with his work being featured in top publications such as INC , ZDnet , MSN and more.

Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

About The Author

Jeff gillis.

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Co-founder and CTO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Jeff is a featured contributor delivering advice on job search, job interviews and career advancement, having published more than 50 pieces of unique content on the site , with his work being featured in top publications such as INC , ZDnet , MSN and more. Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page .

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resume letter of introduction template

Career Sidekick

How to Write a Letter of Introduction (With Examples)

By Priya Jain

Published: January 22, 2024

Priya Jain

Writer & Career Coach

Writing a letter of introduction serves as a tool for individuals and businesses to establish new connections, explore opportunities, or introduce services and products. An effectively written letter of introduction can open doors to job opportunities, business collaborations, and networking.

Whether you’re a freelancer seeking new clients, a business looking to forge new partnerships, or an individual exploring job opportunities, a compelling introduction letter can set the stage for fruitful interactions.

In this article, we explain what a letter of introduction is, explore what to include, and give examples you can use while creating your letter. 

What Is a Letter of Introduction?

A letter of introduction is a document that introduces one party to another. It can serve various purposes in different contexts, including professional, academic, or personal settings. 

This letter can be used to introduce oneself or by someone else to introduce a third party. The key purpose is establishing a connection or a rapport with the recipient, usually with a specific goal, such as exploring job opportunities, proposing business collaborations, or extending networks.

Individuals can use letters of introduction in social settings, like joining a new club or group, where you want to introduce yourself to the members. These letters often introduce a third party, like a colleague or a friend, to your contacts. This can be particularly helpful in professional networking or recommending someone for a job or project .

The Difference Between a Letter of Introduction and a Cover Letter

A letter of introduction and a cover letter are very different. Letters of introduction are generally used when you want to establish a new relationship that may or may not be job-related. It could be an introduction to a potential business partner, a networking contact, or a new community or group. 

On the other hand, a cover letter is job-related. It’s sent alongside a resume when applying for a job. The cover letter focuses on why the applicant is suitable for a specific job, highlighting skills and experiences directly relevant to the job description. It’s more tailored to a particular role or company.

Letter of Introduction Examples

Here are some examples you can take inspiration from:

Job Application Letter of Introduction

This letter aims to introduce yourself to a potential employer, highlight relevant skills and experiences, express interest in the position, and provide a glimpse of your personality.

You can use this example to write a job application introduction letter:

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I am writing to express my keen interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With [X years] of experience in [relevant field/industry], I have developed a comprehensive skill set that aligns with your team’s requirements.

My experience at [Previous Company] involved [mention key responsibilities or projects related to the new job]. I am particularly excited about the opportunity at [Company Name] because of [reasons specific to the company or role].

Enclosed is my resume, which further outlines my achievements. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss how my experience and skills can contribute to the continued success of [Company Name].

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of contributing to your esteemed team.

[Your Name] [Your Contact Information]

Networking Introduction Letter

A networking introduction letter is a valuable tool for establishing new professional connections . It’s a way of introducing yourself to someone in your industry or field whom you haven’t met but wish to connect with for networking purposes.

Here’s an example:

Dear [Contact’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. I am [Your Name], currently working as a [Your Job Title] at [Your Company]. I came across your profile on [LinkedIn/Professional Event] and was impressed by your extensive experience in [relevant field/industry].

I am reaching out to expand my professional network in the [specific industry or field] and would value the opportunity to learn from your insights. [Mention any mutual connections or shared interests, if applicable].

If you are open, I would appreciate talking with you briefly. I want to hear about your experiences, particularly regarding [specific topic or question].

Thank you for considering my request. I understand the value of your time and would be flexible to accommodate your schedule.

Best regards,

Cold Outreach Letter of Introduction

A cold outreach letter of introduction is used when contacting someone who does not know you or is not expecting your communication. It’s typically used professionally to introduce yourself, your company, or your products/services to a potential client, partner, or employer.

Here’s an example:  

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

My name is [Your Name], and I am the [Your Position] at [Your Company]. I am reaching out to introduce our company and the innovative solutions we offer in [specific service or product area].

I believe that [Recipient’s Company] could significantly benefit from our [services/products], especially in [specific area of improvement or opportunity you’ve identified in their business]. We have partnered successfully with companies like yours, such as [mention any relevant clients or case studies], and achieved [mention specific results or improvements].

I would love the opportunity to discuss this further with you. Would you be available for a brief call next week? I am also attaching a brief overview of our services for your reference.

Thank you for your time, and I look forward to working together.

Warm regards,

Letter of Introduction Template

Creating a letter of introduction involves a structured approach to presenting your information effectively.

Here’s a template that you can adapt based on your specific needs:

[Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State, Zip Code] [Email Address] [Phone Number]

[Recipient’s Name] [Recipient’s Title] [Company/Organization Name] [Company Address] [City, State, Zip Code]

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

[Introductory Paragraph: Briefly introduce yourself, stating your name and current position or role. Explain how you came across the recipient, their work, or their organization.]

[Second Paragraph: State the purpose of your letter. Are you seeking a job opportunity, looking to network, or proposing a collaboration? Be specific about your intentions and why you are contacting this particular individual or company.]

[Third Paragraph: Concisely overview your relevant background and experience. Focus on key aspects of your career or education that align with the purpose of your letter.]

[Fourth Paragraph: Highlight one or two significant accomplishments or skills. Use specific examples demonstrating your capabilities and how they relate to the recipient’s needs or interests.]

[Fifth Paragraph: Mention any personal qualities or soft skills that set you apart and are relevant to the context of your introduction. Relate these traits to how they can be beneficial in achieving the goals outlined in your letter.]

[Call to Action: Clearly state what you hope to achieve with this letter. Whether it’s a follow-up meeting, a phone call, or further discussions, provide a clear action you’d like the recipient to take.]

Thank you for taking the time to read my letter. I am very interested in [discussing further, learning more about, etc.] and look forward to the possibility of [working together, meeting you, etc.]. Please contact me at [your email address] or [phone number].

[Your Name] [Attachments: Mention attachments such as your resume, portfolio, or other relevant documents.]

What You Need to Include in a Letter of Introduction

Incorporating specific elements in your letter of introduction can significantly enhance its effectiveness.

Here’s a breakdown of what to include following your provided structure:

Begin with a formal greeting. This is the initial greeting and sets the tone for the letter. Use a formal tone like “Dear [Recipient’s Name]”. If the recipient’s name is unknown, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” are alternatives. Personalizing the salutation, however, is preferable if you know the recipient’s name.

Introduction

Introduce yourself by stating your name and your current position or role in a professional context. This section should be brief, offering a snapshot of who you are. For instance, “My name is Jane Doe, and I am a Marketing Manager at XYZ Corporation.”

Purpose of the Letter

Clearly articulate why you are writing this letter. This might be to introduce yourself in a job search context, to propose a business collaboration, or to establish a new professional relationship. Be specific about why you’re contacting this particular individual or organization.

Background Information

Provide a concise overview of your professional background relevant to the purpose of your letter. This could include your current job, professional journey, or key areas of expertise. The aim is to give the reader context about your professional standing.

Relevant Accomplishments

Highlight significant achievements that are pertinent to the recipient. These could be successful projects you’ve led, awards you’ve won, or specific contributions you’ve made in previous roles. The objective is to showcase your competence and success in areas relevant to the letter’s purpose.

Personal Qualities

Share personal attributes that make you well-suited for the intended purpose of your letter. For instance, you might emphasize qualities like leadership, innovation, or collaborative skills if you are applying for a job. This part is about showing your personality and fit.

Call to Action

This is a crucial component where you suggest the next steps. It could be a request for a follow-up meeting, a phone call, or an invitation to review your application. Make it clear what you want the recipient to do next.

Conclude your letter with a formal and professional closing. Common closings include “Sincerely”, “Best regards”, or “Kind regards”, followed by your full name. This part signifies the end of your letter respectfully.

Attachments

If you include additional documents, such as a resume or portfolio, mention them here. For example, “Enclosed, please find my resume, which provides further details about my professional experience.”

What Not to Include in a Letter of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, it’s important to be aware of certain elements that should be avoided.

Here are what not to include: 

Unsubstantiated Claims

Your letter should avoid making broad statements about your abilities or achievements without providing specific examples or evidence to support them. For instance, rather than simply stating that you’re an excellent communicator, provide a brief example or mention a relevant accomplishment demonstrating this skill. The goal is to be as concrete and specific as possible to build credibility.

Clichés and Overused Phrases

Avoid overused phrases and clichés that don’t add substantive information to your introduction. Phrases like “team player,” “hard worker,” or “go-getter” are commonly used and don’t distinguish you from other candidates. Instead, use unique descriptions specifically tailored to your experiences and qualifications.

Unrealistic Promises

Be cautious about making promises or commitments that you might not be able to fulfill. Overpromising to impress can backfire if you cannot deliver on those promises later. It’s important to be honest and realistic about what you can offer to the potential employer or contact.

Best Practices for Writing Letters of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, following these best practices can greatly enhance the effectiveness and professional impact of your letter:

Tailoring the Letter to the Audience

By researching and familiarizing yourself with the recipient’s work and organization, you can ensure that your letter speaks directly to their needs and interests. Personalization in the letter demonstrates that you have taken the time to understand who they are and what they value, which can significantly increase the effectiveness of your message.

Keeping It Concise and Focused

An effective letter conveys your message in a clear, succinct manner. Long letters can dilute the impact of your key points and lose the reader’s interest. 

Structuring your letter with a clear beginning, middle, and end helps maintain this focus. The introduction should grab attention, the body should elaborate on your purpose and relevant qualifications, and the conclusion should reiterate your intent and suggest the next steps.

Showcasing Personality and Authenticity

An impactful letter is about what you say and how you say it. Infusing your letter with genuine personality and authenticity makes your message resonate more with the recipient. It’s about striking the right balance between professional decorum and personal touch.

Sharing your motivations, interests, or perspectives in a way that aligns with the professional context can make your letter memorable and establish a more personal connection with the recipient.

Proofreading for Clarity and Professionalism

The final yet crucial step in drafting your letter is thorough proofreading. This step is imperative for ensuring your letter is free from grammatical errors and typos and communicates your message.

A well-written and professionally presented letter reflects your attention to detail and commitment to quality. Having someone else review your letter is often beneficial, as a fresh pair of eyes can catch errors and provide feedback on your message’s overall clarity and tone.

Priya Jain

About the Author

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Writing a Letter of Introduction for Employment

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What is a letter of introduction for employment?

What should be included in a letter of introduction for employment, how to write a letter of introduction for employment, letter of introduction for employment example.

A letter of introduction can serve as a professional connection between you and an associate’s next employment opportunity. People who are between jobs or careers, have recently moved to a new city or are simply having a hard time networking may need to ask you for a letter of introduction. This letter can establish a connection to help that individual find their next professional position. This article will explain the purpose of a letter of introduction for employment and how to write one when someone asks you for an introduction letter.

A letter of introduction for employment is a type of communication, usually an email or a formal business letter, that is used to introduce two people in your network. Essentially, you’re writing this letter to help someone attain a position of employment. 

During your career, you may need to write these letters to introduce:

  • New team members
  • Job candidates
  • Customers or clients
  • Freelancers or contractors

A professional letter of introduction can provide context and background related to the person you are introducing. A letter of introduction is a respectful way of getting a person’s name in front of influential people without imposing on their time.

An introduction letter for employment is not a resume, cover letter, reference letter or biography that covers every aspect of someone’s life. Rather, it is a concise and clear explanation as to why you’re writing and how the introduction may be beneficial to the reader. While a letter of introduction for employment may be used in various situations, there are a few standard components that should be included. As you begin writing the letter, be sure to only include pertinent information that may be beneficial to all parties.

Today, most letters of introduction will be sent via email. When composing the message, make sure to use clear, unambiguous language. Many people who are short on time may not even read a lengthy email. Therefore, it is a good idea to write your email as concisely as possible without leaving out any critical information.

Here are some steps to follow as you begin writing a letter of introduction for employment:

1. First, start with a greeting and explanation of why you’re writing the letter

Compose a brief greeting to the influential party to begin the letter. You should include their name on the first line, followed by a social opener. 

Example greeting:

Hi Shanice, I hope you’re having a great week!

2. Second, add a short description of why you’re introducing the two parties

Explain why you’re contacting the influential person to provide context.

Example description or reason why you are writing:

I’m writing as a follow-up to our department meeting about streamlining some of our accounting tasks.

3. Next, include any relevant details such as the name, current position and your knowledge of the person you’re introducing

Present these details and identify why you think their experience relates to the reader.

Example of introduction details:

I’d like to formally introduce you to David Miller. I worked with David at Ackermann Foods, where he held the title of finance project manager. During this time, he helped lead our department through the process of streamlining our accounting system.

4. Then, give the reason you think the two parties would benefit from an introduction

Explain why and how you’re planning on making an in-person introduction. This is the ideal time to mention why you think the two parties should meet.

Example of the reason why you would like to plan an introduction:

After speaking with David about our department meeting, he mentioned that he could assist us in streamlining our accounting tasks. He also stated that his latest project is coming to an end and that he would be happy to meet with us next week about joining the team.

5. Next, include contact information on behalf of the person you’re writing the letter of introduction for

Be sure to include their email address or other relevant contact information. Do not CC the person that you are introducing, as this may make the recipient feel uncomfortable.

Example of contact information to include:

If you feel that David may be a good fit for the team or if you have a question, feel free to contact him at [email protected] or on his cell phone at 555-312-8788.

6. Then, conclude with any other vital information and next steps

Be sure to include any other relevant details that the recipient should be informed about.

Example of how to include next steps:

I’m going to meet with David next week. If you would like me to introduce you to him, I will gladly do so. Please let me know by Friday.

7. Finally, add your name and current position

End the correspondence with a professional closing like ‘Thanks for your time’ or ‘Best regards.’ On the next line, add your name, title and contact information. If you’re writing a physical letter, add your signature before the contact information.

Example of professional closing: 

Sincerely, Margaret Yang Controller [email protected]

Here is an example of a letter of introduction for employment that you can use when creating your own: 

Dear Rachel,

I hope you had a great weekend! I’m writing to you today because I know that there is a sales position currently open. I’d like to introduce you to Duncan Washington. I worked with him at Justworks, where he was the No. 3 salesperson. After I spoke with Duncan and explained our basic requirements, he was excited about the possibility of meeting you.

If you feel that Duncan may be a good fit for the team or if you have a question, feel free to contact him at [email protected] or on his cell phone at 555-321-7777.

You can also read more about Duncan’s experience at duncanwashington.portfolio.com.

Best Regards, Emily Sprout Marketing Director [email protected]

Status.net

A Perfect Letter of Introduction [Examples]

By Status.net Editorial Team on June 14, 2023 — 15 minutes to read

  • How To Write a Letter of Introduction Part 1
  • Types of Introduction Letters Part 2
  • Letter of Introduction Template Part 3
  • Templates: Letter of Introduction for Job Seekers Part 4
  • Templates: Letter of Introduction for Networking Part 5
  • Templates: New Team Member Letter of Introduction Part 6
  • Employee to Customer Introduction Letter Template Part 7
  • Business Introduction Template Part 8
  • Tips for Writing a Perfect Letter of Introduction Part 9

A good letter of introduction can be a valuable tool in making new connections, whether for personal, professional, or business purposes. In this article, we’ll explore how to write a perfect letter of introduction.

To begin, it’s important to understand the difference between a letter of introduction and other forms of introductory communication. An introduction letter isn’t a cover letter – rather, it serves to establish relationships and spark interest.

Difference Between Introduction Letter and Cover Letter

An introduction letter is not a cover letter. While both documents are used to make introductions, they serve different purposes. An introduction letter is typically written to introduce yourself, your business, or a third party, whereas a cover letter is used when applying for a job or sending a proposal. In an introduction letter, you should briefly highlight your background, accomplishments, and goals, while in a cover letter, you should focus on how your skills and experiences relate to a specific job opportunity.

Introduction Letter vs. Letter of Recommendation

An introduction letter is also not a letter of recommendation. A letter of recommendation is written by someone who knows you well, like a former employer, teacher, or mentor, to vouch for your abilities and accomplishments. It often includes specific examples of your work and contributions, as well as why the person is recommending you for a certain position or opportunity.

Related: A Perfect Letter of Recommendation [8 Templates]

An introduction letter is written by you or on behalf of an individual or company to make an initial connection with others. While you might mention your skills and experience in an introduction letter, it doesn’t have the same weight or credibility as a letter of recommendation, since it lacks the endorsements from others.

Related: How to Ask for a Letter of Recommendation [Examples]

The Full Guide to Reference Letters [Best Templates]

  • An introduction letter is used to introduce yourself, your company, or a third party to others.
  • A cover letter is used when applying for a job or submitting a proposal, focusing on how your skills and experiences relate to the specific opportunity.
  • A letter of recommendation is a formal endorsement of your abilities and accomplishments, written by someone who knows you well.

Remember to use the appropriate type of letter for each situation and adhere to the specific guidelines and tone for each document: this will ensure your communication is effective and appropriate, increasing your chances of making a positive impression.

Part 1 How To Write a Letter of Introduction

Format and structure.

To write an effective letter of introduction, start with proper formatting. Use a standard font, such as Arial or Times New Roman, and set the font size to 12. Stick to a formal tone, and use single spacing with a space between paragraphs.

Greeting and Opening Remarks

Begin your letter with a professional greeting. If you know the recipient’s name, use “Dear [Name].” If not, use “Dear [Title]” or “To Whom It May Concern.” Your opening remarks should briefly explain the purpose of the letter and introduce yourself or the person you are introducing.

Related: How to Start a Letter (and Mistakes to Avoid)

In the main body of the letter, provide details about yourself or the person you are introducing. Focus on the key qualifications, skills, and experiences that are relevant to the recipient. This is also an ideal place to mention any mutual connections or shared interests.

  • Keep the paragraphs short and concise.
  • Highlight your achievements or expertise.
  • Use bullet points or tables to enumerate qualifications or experiences, if necessary.

Closing and Sign Off

To close the letter, express your gratitude to the recipient for their time and attention. Offer your assistance if they have further questions or would like additional information. Use a standard sign-off, such as “Sincerely,” “Best Regards,” or “Yours Faithfully,” followed by your full name and contact information (e.g., email, phone number).

Related: How to End an Email Professionally (Examples)

Remember to proofread your letter of introduction and ensure that spelling, grammar, and punctuation are accurate before sending it off.

Part 2 Types of Introduction Letters

Job-related introductions.

In job-related introduction letters, you are typically introducing yourself as a potential employee or applicant. This is useful when seeking new job opportunities, submitting your resume, or reaching out to potential employers. Your letter should showcase your skills, experience, and enthusiasm for the position while also expressing your interest in the company and its mission.

Networking Introductions

When networking, it’s important to make a great first impression by introducing yourself effectively. In a networking introduction letter, the goal is to establish a connection with an individual or a group within your industry. Mention your title, role, and any common acquaintances you may have. Also, highlight some of your accomplishments or notable experiences relevant to the people you’re introducing yourself to.

Agency or Freelancer Introductions

If you are an agency or a freelancer looking for clients, an introduction letter is a great way to showcase your services and expertise. The focus should be on how you can support the client’s needs and help them achieve their goals. Provide a brief overview of your industry experience, the services you offer, and some examples of successful projects or satisfied clients.

Team Introduction

In a team introduction letter, your objective is to introduce your team members to a new client, project team, or department. Detail the relevant qualifications, skills, and areas of expertise for each team member. This will help establish trust and confidence in your team’s abilities. Be sure to include contact information to facilitate further communication.

Letter of Introduction Examples

Part 3 letter of introduction template.

Dear [Recipient],

I hope this letter finds you well. My name is [Your Name], and I am writing to introduce myself to you. [Insert a brief sentence or two about yourself, such as your current position or relevant experience]. I am reaching out to you because [insert reason for writing the letter, such as expressing interest in a job opportunity or seeking to establish a professional relationship].

I am excited to learn more about your organization and explore opportunities for collaboration. Please feel free to reach out to me at [insert contact information] if you have any questions or would like to discuss further.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Best regards, [Your Name]

Templates for various types of introduction letters:

Part 4 Templates: Letter of Introduction for Job Seekers

When you are seeking a new job, it’s essential to introduce yourself professionally. Here’s an example of a letter of introduction for job seekers:

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. My name is [Your Name] and I am writing to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. I came across your job posting on [Job Board/Website] and believe my skills and experience make me an ideal candidate.

Throughout my career, I have worked on various projects focusing on [specific skills or subject matter]. At my previous job at [Previous Company Name], I [describe a significant achievement or responsibility]. Additionally, I am skilled in [list relevant skills] and have experience using [software or tools related to the job].

I have attached my resume for your review, which includes more information on my background and qualifications. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss my suitability for the position during an interview. Please feel free to contact me at [Your Email] or [Your Phone Number] to schedule a meeting or for any further information.

Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sincerely, [Your Name] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

Related: Best Job Interview Request Email Responses (Examples)

Subject: [Your Name] – [Target Job Title]

I came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company Name] and after reviewing your company’s impressive accomplishments in [Industry], I believe that my [Number of Years] years of experience in a similar role make me an ideal fit.

Enclosed is my resume, which highlights my expertise in [Specific Skills or Accomplishments]. I am confident that my experience in [Area of Expertise] would make a valuable contribution to your team.

[Optional: Mention any mutual connections, if applicable.]

I would welcome the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further and explore how I could contribute to [Company Name]’s success. Thank you for considering my application.

Part 5 Templates: Letter of Introduction for Networking

A networking introduction letter aims to establish connections with potential clients, partners, or colleagues.

Subject: Introduction – [Your Name] and [Recipient’s Name]

Hi [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this message finds you well. I came across your profile while searching for professionals in the [Industry] field, and I am impressed by your experience and accomplishments.

As a fellow professional in the [Industry], I believe that connecting with like-minded individuals like yourself can greatly benefit both our careers. I am particularly interested in [Specific Area of Interest] and would appreciate any insights or advice you may have.

If you’re open to it, I’d love to set up a time to chat over a coffee or a quick phone call. Looking forward to your response.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

I hope this email finds you well. My name is [Your Name], and I am a [Your Profession or Title] at [Your Company or Organization]. I recently attended the [Event or Conference Name] and saw your insightful presentation on [Topic]. Your ideas resonated with me, and I believe your expertise could benefit the projects I am currently working on.

My current projects involve [briefly describe your projects, e.g., developing new software or implementing a marketing strategy]. I am eager to learn more about your work in [Recipient’s Field of Expertise] and would love to schedule a phone call or coffee meeting to discuss our shared interests and potential collaboration.

Please let me know when you are available, and I will be happy to make arrangements. You can contact me at [Your Email] or [Your Phone Number].

Looking forward to connecting with you.

Part 6 Templates: New Team Member Letter of Introduction

Template 1: introducing yourself.

When joining a new team, a letter of introduction helps introduce you to your colleagues and establish rapport.

Subject: Hello from [Your Name], your new [Job Title / Team Role]

Dear [Team Name or Colleagues],

I hope this email finds you all in good spirits. My name is [Your Name], and I am excited to join the [Company Name] team as your new [Job Title / Team Role]. It’s a pleasure to meet all of you!

A little bit about myself: I have been working in the [Your Industry] for [Number of Years] years, mainly focusing on [Area of Expertise]. My skills include [list relevant skills], and I am proficient in [software or tools you will be using].

In my spare time, I enjoy [mention personal hobbies or interests to connect on a personal level].

I am eager to contribute to the team’s success and look forward to learning from each of you. Please feel free to reach out if you have any questions or concerns, or if you would like to grab lunch or coffee together.

Thank you for the warm welcome, and have a great day!

Best, [Your Name]

Template 2: New Team Member

Welcome a new team member with this template, outlining their role and initial responsibilities.

Subject: Welcome [New Team Member’s Name]!

Dear [Existing Team Members],

Please join me in extending a warm welcome to our newest team member, [New Team Member’s Name]. [He/She/They] will be joining us as a [New Team Member’s Job Title] effective [Start Date].

[New Team Member’s Name] brings with them a wealth of experience in [Area of Expertise], having worked at [Previous Company] for [Number of Years Experience]. In their new role, they will be responsible for [Responsibilities].

We are excited to have [New Team Member’s Name] on board and look forward to their contributions as we continue to grow and succeed.

Please take the time to introduce yourself to [New Team Member’s Name] and offer any assistance they may need as they familiarize themselves with our processes and systems.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Title]

Part 7 Employee to Customer Introduction Letter Template

Introducing an employee to clients or customers:

Dear [Customer],

I am writing to introduce you to our newest team member, [Employee Name]. [He/She] is joining us as [Position/Title] and brings with [him/her] [Number] years of experience in [Industry/Specialization].

[Employee Name] is an expert in [Skill/Expertise] and has a proven track record of delivering exceptional [Service/Product]. [He/She] is committed to providing our customers with the highest level of service and ensuring that their needs are met with the utmost care and attention.

We are thrilled to have [Employee Name] on board and believe that [he/she] will be a valuable asset to our team and to our customers. [He/She] is excited to meet and work with all of you, and we are confident that you will find [him/her] to be a knowledgeable and helpful resource.

Please join me in welcoming [Employee Name] to our team and we look forward to continuing to serve you with excellence.

Sincerely, [Your Name] [Your Title] [Company Name]

Part 8 Business Introduction Template

Introduce your business to potential clients, partners, or investors with this template.

Subject: Introducing [Your Company Name]

I would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to [Your Company Name], a [Description of Your Business] that specializes in [Product/Service Offering]. We have successfully served clients in [Industry] for [Number of Years/Timeframe].

Our key services/products include: – [Service/Product 1] – [Service/Product 2] – [Service/Product 3]

We understand the challenges faced by businesses like yours in the [Industry] sector and have a track record of delivering solutions tailored to your needs. Our expertise in [Specific Area] allows us to offer you the best possible service.

We would be thrilled to explore how our offerings can provide value to your organization. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions or would like to schedule a meeting.

Best regards, [Your Name] [Your Title] [Your Company] [Your Email Address] [Your Phone Number]

Part 9 Tips for Writing a Perfect Letter of Introduction

When writing a letter of introduction, it is important to keep it brief. Clearly state the purpose and get straight to the point. Remember, your recipient may have a busy schedule, so limit your introduction to a few paragraphs. Being concise ensures that your message is understood and remains memorable.

Use a Professional Tone

Maintain a professional tone throughout your letter of introduction. Be confident, knowledgeable, and clear. Avoid using casual language or informal expressions. This demonstrates your respect for the recipient and reflects well on your professionalism.

Include Contact Information

Ensure that you include your contact information, such as email address and phone number, so the recipient can easily reach you. This can be placed at the beginning or end of the letter. Including your contact information allows the recipient to respond and take the desired action.

Before sending your letter of introduction, proofread it carefully for errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. A well-written, error-free letter shows attention to detail and care in your communication. Ask a colleague or friend to review your letter for additional insights and suggestions.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you start a good introduction letter.

To start a good introduction letter, ensure you have a clear purpose for the letter. Begin by addressing the recipient by name if possible and introducing yourself. State the reason for writing the letter and try to engage the recipient’s interest with a hook, such as a shared connection or a relevant accomplishment. Example:

My name is [Your Name] and I am writing to introduce myself and express my interest in [reason for writing the letter]. I hope this letter finds you well.

I wanted to reach out to you because [hook – shared connection or relevant accomplishment]. As someone who is [briefly describe your background or experience], I believe that I would be a valuable asset to your [company/organization/project].

I am excited to learn more about your work and how I can contribute to it. Please feel free to reach out to me at [contact information] to discuss this further.

Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

What distinguishes a letter of introduction from other types of letters?

A letter of introduction is specifically written to introduce yourself, your business, or an employee to another party. It aims to establish a relationship, provide information about your expertise or service offerings, and potentially open up opportunities for collaboration. Unlike cover letters, which focus on a specific job position, introduction letters highlight your skills or experiences more broadly and are often used for networking purposes.

What are the different types of introduction letters?

Introduction letters come in various forms, such as:

  • Business to Business (B2B) – Introducing a company, product, or service.
  • Employee to Customer – Introducing an employee to clients or customers.
  • Self-introduction – Introducing oneself for networking, job applications, or collaboration opportunities.
  • New Hire Introduction – Introducing a new employee to the team or organization.

What are some effective tips for writing a letter of introduction?

  • Be concise and clear about your purpose.
  • Use a professional tone and language.
  • Personalize the letter by addressing the recipient by name.
  • Emphasize your strengths, experiences, or areas of expertise.
  • Include a call-to-action, such as requesting a meeting or asking the recipient to review your attached documents.
  • Proofread and edit your letter for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.
  • How to Ask for a Letter of Recommendation [Examples]
  • How to Start a Letter (and Mistakes to Avoid)
  • How to End an Email Professionally (Examples)
  • Emotional Intelligence (EQ) in Leadership [Examples, Tips]
  • A Perfect Letter of Recommendation [8 Templates]
  • Effective Nonverbal Communication in the Workplace (Examples)

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Resume Introduction Letter

Last Updated On August 29, 2018 By Letter Writing Leave a Comment

A resume introduction letter is a formal letter written by an individual who has applied for a position in a company or an organization. The letter is just like an attachment with the actual resume and is an introduction to the resume or the CV. It is a lot similar to an email cover letter. It serves as an introduction to what is going to follow. Resumes are opportunities to showcase what sets you apart from the rest of the applicants and what makes you unique or desirable to the person reading it. It allows you to highlight your qualities all in one paper.

Your resume is your identity when it comes to applying for a job, so you can understand the level of value it holds. Resume introduction letters will always contain some details about the resume or the person’s interest in the position, but they will never disclose much. Resume introduction letters are short letters and do not contain more than one paragraph.

Resume Introduction Letter Writing Tips

  • Keep the letter short. Never divulge too much. Sometimes people make the mistake of informally describing their resume in the introduction letter. This is a mistake. Resumes and CVs are the documents meant to describe the person’s qualifications and credentials. The introduction letter or the email cover letter is not intended for this purpose.
  • Mention certain important details in the letter, such as when you had appeared for a previous interview, if any, or if there are any general conferences that you might have attended in the past. Describe anything that might be related to you participating in the affairs of the company.
  • End the letter by thanking the person sincerely, since this is extremely necessary and the person must know that you are of a polite demeanor and nature as well as know how to be respectful to your senior.
  • Your resume should reflect who you are. Learn to keep it straightforward and concise, but at the same time formal and professional. Employers will be reading hundreds of resumes a day; the goal is to ensure that your resume stands out.

Resume Introduction Letter Template

Use our free Resume Introduction Letter to help you get started.

From (Sender’s name and address)

___________

Date- (Date on which letter is written)

To (Receiver’s name and address)

Subject: Resume introduction letter

Respected Mr./Ms.______,

This letter is being written to inform you that on ______ [mention day and date], I have sent you my resume and my application for the post of ______ [mention designation]. I hope you will consider it for the post.

I at this moment assure you that I will be a diligent employee and a real worker. I will work proficiently and efficiently to deliver your company’s goals and aims.

Kindly consider my application.

_______ [Name and details]

Sample Letter

Aniket More, Stellar Tower, Chembur, Mumbai

Jitendra Sinha Scalium Digital Media, Kalpataru Complex, Worli, Mumbai

Respected Mr./Ms. Jitendra Sinha,

This is to inform you that I am officially applying for the post of Senior Executive Officer in your company. I have sent you my resume today, on the 24th of July, and am at this moment thanking you for the opportunity to broaden my horizons by being able to apply for this job post.

I believe I have the credentials and the necessary qualifications for this job. I also believe I’ll be able to live up to your expectations and deliver my full potential.

In addition to this, I urge you to consider my resume and my official application for this position. I believe you shall be receiving both of these documents shortly. I at this moment sincerely hope that you will consider my application and resume. I assure you I will work hard and deliver well.

Yours sincerely,

Aniket More

Email Format

This is the email format to follow for a resume introduction.

To: [email protected]

From: [email protected]

Subject: Resume Introduction Letter

Dear Mr.Werk,

It is my pleasure to introduce the resume of Ms. Jonna Keffer with regards to the job opening for receptionists in your prestigious firm. She will be the best candidate for this post, and I can assure you that.

She has the necessary qualifications that will meet your standards such as her educational attainment and work experiences. Her pleasing appearance will surely make her an asset to your company. She can speak various languages which, again, meet your standards. Since she has no current employer, she is very much available in case she will be hired.

Enclosed herewith is a copy of her resume and I am hoping for your positive response on this matter. Please call me in your free time before the weekend concerning this matter. I’m very happy to have assisted you.

Reah Wright,

HR Manager.

Enclosure(1)

Related Letters:

  • Construction Company Introduction Letter
  • Business Introduction Letter Format
  • Company Introduction Letter Template
  • Contractor Letter Of Introduction
  • Introduction Letter
  • CV Introduction Letter
  • Introduction Letter For a Job
  • Self Introduction Letter
  • Professional Introduction Letter
  • Realtor Introduction Letter
  • Business Introduction Letter
  • Catalogue Introduction Letter
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  • Introduction Letter to Customer
  • Introduction Letter Format
  • Introduction Letter Template
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  • New Employee Introduction Letter
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Letter of Introduction

In third party introduction letters, the writer is addressing someone they are familiar with and introducing a third party to the recipient. Generally, specific requests for employment or other assistance accompany the letter. These letters tend to be less formal as they are usually sent to someone you know well.

In blind contact introduction letters, the writer does not know the recipient. The entire purpose of the letter is to make the introduction. These types of letters are essential in building business and customer relationships.

Introduction letters are often confused with referral letters, cover letters or application letters, each of which is used under different circumstances.

Letter of Introduction Template

Letter of Introduction Template

Other Versions

Description.

Trying to build up your rolodex or help out a friend or associate? Use this free letter of introduction template to help break the ice.

Author : Brent Weight and Jon Wittwer

License : Limited Use

Tips: How to Write a Letter of Introduction

  • It is ok to keep the letter less formal if it is someone you know well
  • Be concise and stay on topic
  • Ask for specific assistance – don't make general or unattainable requests
  • Provide contact information for the person being referred
  • An introduction letter might just be an email between friends or colleagues

Sample Introduction Letters

Business letter of introduction sample.

I am writing to introduce you to a remarkable young woman, Cami Larsen. She has worked for me the past 6 months and has done an excellent job.

Cami has been very valuable to our team. She has a bachelor's degree in marketing and she has a great sense of current market trends. She has been marketing lead on several key projects for us. Her husband recently was transferred to New York so she will be leaving us shortly. We will be sad to see her go. Since she will be coming your way, I was hoping that you might be willing to consider Cami for a position in your firm or assist her with finding other opportunities in New York. She will be a great asset to whoever hires her on.

Let me know if you have any questions or you can reach Cami directly at (123) 456-7890. I am sure she can provide you with a resume if you wish. Thank you for your time and assistance.

More Sample Introduction Letters

  • Letter of Introduction = Cover Letter - seattlecentral.edu - This pdf says that a cover letter is a type of introduction letter because you are introducing yourself to your employer and inviting them to read your resume.
  • Letter of Introduction Examples and Writing Tips - thebalancecareers.com

Additional Resources

  • The Art of the Introduction - techcrunch.com - In this age of emails, yours needs to not blend in. Check this out for specific tips on introducing yourself by email.

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How to Introduce Yourself Professionally (In Person, Virtual Interview, Or Email)

Nathan Thompson

3 Key Takeaways

  • How to make a lasting positive impression in any professional setting.
  • Ways to introduce yourself across different mediums: resumes, letters, and in-person encounters.
  • How Teal’s AI resume builder can help you make a great first impression in your job search.

The importance of a professional introduction

First impressions matter. Well, to be more accurate, they matter a lot .

Research shows people form judgments within seconds of meeting someone new or encountering a new situation. That means how you introduce yourself in those first few moments has a powerful impact on how others perceive you.

A polished introduction can open doors and create opportunities. A lackluster introduction can close doors just as quickly. 

Whether you're networking, job hunting, or meeting potential clients, you need to learn how to introduce yourself to make a positive first impression.

How to introduce yourself professionally in a resume

Introducing yourself professionally in a resume is your first opportunity to make a powerful impression on a potential employer.

Your resume's introduction isn't just a polite greeting; it's a strategic, concise summary of your professional brand. This section aims to captivate recruiters, urging them to explore the depth of your experiences and consider you a top candidate for the position.

What is a resume introduction?

The resume introduction , often at the top of your resume, is a snapshot of your professional achievements and gives you a chance to highlight key skills.

self introduction in resume

It's the initial pitch to the hiring manager, summarizing why you're not only qualified but the best fit for the role.

Why are resume introductions important?

Your introduction sets the narrative for your entire resume. It's your chance to tell your professional story in a way that is compelling and aligned with your desired role

This narrative frames your application, making you memorable and encouraging recruiters to read on with interest.

Expert tips for writing a resume introduction

1. Start with a strong action verb : Kick off your resume introduction with dynamic action verbs like "Engineered," "Designed," "Led," or "Developed" to command attention and convey your proactive approach.

2. Quantify achievements : Wherever possible, use numbers to quantify your achievements. Statements like "Increased sales by 30%" or "Reduced operational costs by 20%" provide tangible evidence of your professional impact.

3. Tailor it to the job description : Customize your introduction to mirror the language and requirements of the job listing. Incorporating keywords and phrases from the job description makes your resume more relevant.

4. Highlight unique qualifications : Mention any unique qualifications or experiences that set you apart from other candidates. This could include specialized certifications, advanced training, or a unique blend of skills.

5. Keep it concise : While it's tempting to emphasize your experience by including every achievement and job title you've ever held, the key is to be selective. Your introduction should be a high-impact summary, not an exhaustive list. Aim for three to four sentences that encapsulate your professional identity.

Using Teal's AI-Powered Resume Builder

Teal's AI-powered Resume Builder simplifies the process of crafting a standout resume introduction.

By leveraging advanced AI technology, you can ensure your introduction is not only impactful but also perfectly tailored to your desired role. With personalized suggestions and a user-friendly interface, Teal helps you create an introduction that truly represents your professional narrative.

Some benefits of using Teal for your professional introduction include:

  • Interactive guidance : Receive suggestions on improving your introduction based on your specific experiences and the job you're targeting.
  • Customization tools : Easily tailor your introduction to include the right mix of keywords and phrases that resonate with the job description.
  • Real-time examples : Draw inspiration from a library of examples and templates designed to spark ideas and help you articulate your professional story.

Read More: For more tips on how to introduce yourself in a resume, check out our guide here .

How to introduce yourself in the About Me section

Crafting an About Me section on your resume is about infusing your application with personality and providing a glimpse into who you are outside of your professional achievements.

This section is distinct from the resume introduction, as it dives deeper into your personal attributes, motivations, and the unique blend of experiences that shape your professional identity.

What is an About Me section?

An About Me section is a brief personal narrative that complements the factual, achievement-oriented, and professional tone of the rest of your resume.

While the introduction is designed to make a compelling case for your professional qualifications, the About Me section offers a narrative that humanizes you. It bridges the gap between your professional skills and personal qualities, presenting a holistic view of who you are as a potential employee.

Why is an About Me section important? 

There are many reasons you would want to include an About Me section on your resume, but here are three big ones:

  • Personalization : In a sea of similar qualifications and experiences, your About Me section can make your application stand out by highlighting your unique personality and approach to work.
  • Cultural fit : This section can give employers insight into how well you might mesh with their company culture and team dynamics.
  • Engagement : By sharing a bit of your story, you engage readers on a more personal level, making your resume more memorable.

How to write a strong About Me section

1. Be genuine : Authenticity resonates. Share true aspects of your personality and professional ethos relevant to the role in question.

2. Highlight unique selling points : What makes you different from other candidates with similar professional backgrounds? Lean into your entrepreneurial spirit or your commitment to sustainability.

3. Address value addition : Articulate how your personal qualities can add value to the team and company. For example, your ability to foster a positive team environment or your innovative approach to problem-solving.

4. Keep it relevant : While it's personal, the About Me section should still tie back to your professional goals and the employer's needs as listed in the job description.

5. Be concise : Like the rest of your resume, this section should be succinct. Aim for a few sentences that capture your personality and professional demeanor.

Read More: Check out this post for information about how to write an About Me section .

How to introduce yourself professionally in a letter of introduction

A letter of introduction isn't just a formality but a strategic tool to establish connections with potential employers, clients, or new colleagues. It serves as a precursor to future interactions, laying the groundwork for productive professional relationships.

What is a letter of introduction?

A letter of introduction is a proactive approach to networking. It's your chance to say hello and express your interest in working with or for the recipient.

Unlike a cover letter, which is often attached to a resume for a specific job application, a letter of introduction may be sent independently to spark a professional relationship or explore potential opportunities.

How do you write a good letter of introduction?

1. Personalize your greeting : Address the recipient by name to establish a direct and personal connection from the start.

2. Clarify your purpose : Be clear about why you're reaching out. Whether it's seeking mentorship, exploring job opportunities, or proposing a collaboration, your intent should be clear.

3. Emphasize mutual benefits : Highlight what you bring to the table and how it aligns with the recipient’s goals or needs. This could be your expertise, experience, or a shared vision.

4. Be brief but impactful : Keep your letter concise, but ensure it contains enough detail to intrigue the recipient and encourage them to engage further.

5. Include a call to action : Conclude with a polite request for a meeting, phone call, or the best way to continue the conversation.

Read More: For more information on this, check out this comprehensive guide on how to create a letter of introduction .

How to introduce yourself professionally in person

There are a few ways you should be prepared to introduce yourself to others in person, including when you need an elevator pitch, what to discuss at networking events, and how to introduce yourself to a new team.

Elevator pitch 

An elevator pitch is a brief, persuasive speech that describes an idea, product, or service in a concise and compelling way. It's called an elevator pitch because it should be short enough to present during an elevator ride.

Here's how to make one: Craft a concise, memorable statement about your professional background, skills, and aspirations. Focus on what makes you unique and how you can solve the listener's problem.

Practice delivering it naturally within 30 seconds to 1 minute.

To craft an effective elevator pitch, consider these factors:

  • Content : Briefly summarize your professional background, highlighting unique skills and experiences. Mention your current role or professional aspirations.
  • Objective : Clearly state what you're looking for, whether it's a job opportunity, advice, or a professional connection.
  • Personal touch : Add a personal anecdote or interest that makes your pitch memorable and relatable.
  • Practice : Rehearse your pitch to ensure it's concise and can be delivered confidently within 30 to 60 seconds.
  • Adaptability : Be prepared to adjust your pitch based on the listener's background and interests to make it more relevant and engaging.

Networking events 

When attending networking events, approach introductions with strategic preparation. 

Start by identifying your professional goals and how they align with the event's focus. Craft a brief introduction that not only presents your background and skills but also explicitly states what you're looking for, whether it's insights, opportunities, or connections in your field. 

Engage actively by asking others about their experiences and what brought them to the event. Then, share relevant aspects of your experience, to create a reciprocal dialogue. 

This approach fosters meaningful connections, positioning you as both interested and interesting to potential contacts.

What if you get nervous meeting new people? 

It's common for new job seekers to feel nervous when chatting with strangers at networking events. 

To alleviate this, start with small steps, such as setting a goal for the number of people you want to meet. Prepare a brief introduction about yourself, including what you do and what interests you professionally. 

Practice active listening, which helps you engage more naturally in conversations. Nodding your head can be a positive body language signal to your listener and keep the conversation flowing smoothly.

Remember, most attendees are there for similar reasons and likely feel just as nervous. Focus on making genuine connections rather than trying to meet everyone. Networking is a skill that improves with practice, so give yourself grace as you learn and grow in this area.

When meeting a new team, conveying a blend of your professional background and personal enthusiasm can be beneficial. 

To establish credibility, begin by summarizing your career milestones, particularly those relevant to your new role. Show genuine excitement about the opportunity to be part of the team, discussing how you plan to contribute based on your skills and experience. 

Emphasize past collaborative achievements to illustrate your teamwork capabilities and set a tone of mutual respect and anticipation for shared success.

Professional introduction examples: On paper

1. resume introduction example.

Objective: Introduce the candidate’s professional background and skills, setting the tone for the resume. 

Dynamic and results-driven marketing professional with over seven years of experience in leading successful digital campaigns. Proven track record of enhancing brand visibility and engagement through strategic SEO, content marketing, and social media tactics. Passionate about leveraging data analytics to drive business decisions and growth. Seeking to bring my expertise in digital marketing strategy and leadership to the Marketing Manager position at Innovatech Solutions.

Why it works : This introduction showcases the candidate's extensive experience and skill set in digital marketing, directly aligning with the job description.

The use of dynamic language and specific achievements (such as enhancing brand visibility and engagement) immediately grabs attention.

Stating the desire to bring expertise to a new position also demonstrates the candidate’s proactive approach and alignment with potential employer goals.

2. About Me section sample

Objective: Provide a personal narrative that offers insight into the candidate’s unique qualities and professional ethos.

Creative at heart and analytical in approach, I am a graphic designer who thrives on bringing brands to life through compelling visuals and storytelling. With a keen eye for design and a deep understanding of consumer psychology, I craft experiences that resonate and build connections. Beyond pixels and palettes, I am a collaborator and a continuous learner, always exploring new trends and technologies to stay at the forefront of the design world.

Why it works : This personal narrative balances professional competencies and personal passions, making the candidate more relatable and memorable.

The first few words act as a personal tagline of sorts, highlighting both creative and analytical skills, appealing to employers looking for well-rounded candidates. The emphasis on collaboration and continuous learning showcases the candidate as a valuable team player committed to growth and innovation.

3. Letter of introduction sample

Objective: Open a dialogue with potential employers, clients, or colleagues, showcasing interest and value. 

Dear [Recipient's Name],

I am writing to introduce myself as a seasoned Financial Analyst who has recently discovered the exciting work being done at [Company Name]. With over 10 years of experience in financial modeling, risk assessment, and strategic planning, I have consistently provided actionable insights that drive profitability and growth for organizations. What particularly excites me is that my passion for finance and technology is in perfect alignment with [Company Name]'s mission to redefine the financial landscape.

I am eager to explore how my background and skills can contribute to the success of your team. I would love the opportunity to discuss potential opportunities and how I can bring value to [Company Name]. Thank you for considering my application.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Why it works : The letter establishes a direct connection with the recipient by expressing admiration for the company’s mission and relating the candidate's experience and skills to the company's needs.

It demonstrates a proactive attitude and a strong fit for the company’s culture and objectives.

The specific mention of years of experience and areas of expertise reinforces the candidate's qualifications and readiness to contribute.

4. Email introduction sample

Objective: Establish an async professional connection that communicates how your skills and aspirations can bridge a gap for the company, making you an ideal partner. 

Subject : Introduction - [Your Name], Web Developer Interested in Collaborative Opportunities 

Dear [Recipient’s Name], 

My name is [Your Name]. I’m a web developer specializing in creating intuitive, high-performance websites. With a strong foundation in both front-end and back-end technologies, I am passionate about developing solutions that enhance user experience and drive business success. 

I have been following [Company Name]’s work in the tech industry and am impressed by your innovative approach. I am interested in learning more about potential collaboration opportunities and how I can bring my technical skills and creativity to your projects.

I look forward to hearing from you.

[Your Name]

Why it works: This email is concise, making it easy for the recipient to quickly understand the candidate's background and interest.

The subject line is clear and relevant, ensuring the email is likely to be opened.

By mentioning admiration for the company and expressing a desire for collaboration, the candidate initiates a professional relationship on a positive note. The emphasis on both technical skills and a desire to contribute to the company's projects shows a blend of competence and cooperation.

Professional introduction examples: In person

1. elevator pitch example.

Hi, I'm Jordan, a software developer with over five years of experience specializing in mobile app development, particularly for Android platforms. I've led projects that have increased user engagement by up to 40%. I'm passionate about creating apps that solve real-world problems, and I'm currently exploring opportunities where I can bring my expertise in innovative tech solutions to a team that's as enthusiastic about technology as I am.

Why it works: This elevator pitch is succinct yet informative, providing a snapshot of Jordan's professional background, achievements, and aspirations.

It effectively communicates Jordan's core competencies and career goals within a brief time frame, making it ideal for quick professional introductions. 

The specific mention of increased user engagement adds credibility to their claims, while the mention of looking for new opportunities opens the door for further conversation.

2. Networking event introduction example

Hey, I'm Alex, a digital marketing strategist. I've made a career off increasing online presence and sales through targeted social media campaigns. I've worked with several startups to scale their business online, achieving up to a 30 percent increase in online revenue. I love discussing innovative marketing strategies and learning about new trends in digital advertising. What's your experience with digital marketing?

Why it works: Alex's introduction is tailored for a networking event, highlighting their expertise and results achieved.

Alex also ends with a question, transforming the introduction into a two-way conversation, inviting others to share their experiences, and fostering engagement immediately.

This approach not only showcases Alex's skills but also demonstrates their interest in mutual learning and collaboration.

3. New team introduction example

Good morning, everyone! I'm Samantha, the new project manager joining your team. I have more than 10 years of experience managing projects in the tech industry, where I've focused on streamlining processes and enhancing team collaboration to deliver projects on time and under budget. I'm excited to bring my passion for efficient project management to this team and help us achieve new heights together. I look forward to getting to know each of you and learning how we can collaborate effectively.

Why it works: Sam's introduction to the new team is clear and concise, outlining their professional background, specific areas of expertise, and achievements.

Sam creates a positive first impression by expressing excitement and eagerness to collaborate, signaling their readiness to contribute to the team's success and foster a collaborative working environment.

This approach helps in building rapport and establishing a foundation for future teamwork.

Final thoughts

The ability to introduce yourself professionally, whether through a resume, a letter, or in person, is a pivotal skill in today's competitive professional landscape. 

Mastering this art can significantly influence your career trajectory, opening doors to new opportunities and fostering meaningful connections.

By leveraging the insights and tools provided by Teal, including the AI-powered Resume Builder and the AI Professional Summary feature, you can craft introductions that not only capture your professional essence but also resonate with your audience. 

Remember, a compelling introduction is more than just a first impression; it's a strategic communication that highlights your unique value proposition. Whether you're crafting an About Me section on your resume, penning a letter of introduction, or preparing your elevator pitch, the key is to be authentic, concise, and relevant to your audience. 

With practice, reflection, and the right resources, you can transform the way you present yourself professionally, turning introductions into gateways for growth and success.

Ready to make an unforgettable first impression on hiring managers? Try Teal's AI Professional Summary feature and elevate your professional introduction today with a conversation-starting resume.

FAQs about professional introductions

How do i professionally introduce myself in an email.

To introduce yourself professionally in an email, start with a clear and relevant subject line, such as "Introduction - [Your Name], [Your Profession]." Address the recipient by name for a personal touch. 

Begin the email with a brief introduction of yourself, including your name, profession, and the purpose of your email. Highlight any mutual interests or connections, and clearly state what you are seeking from the correspondence. End with a specific call to action, inviting the recipient to respond, and close with a professional signature that includes your contact details.

How do I professionally introduce myself in an interview?

"Tell me about yourself" is a common ice breaker in job interviews. Start by thanking the interviewer for the opportunity. Proceed with a one-minute summary of your professional background, focusing on your education, key experiences, and achievements relevant to the position you're applying for. Highlight what makes you a strong candidate for the role, including specific skills and experiences that align with the job description. Be confident and maintain positive body language throughout your introduction to make a strong first impression.

How do I professionally introduce myself in a meeting?

When introducing yourself in a meeting, start by stating your name and job title. Briefly describe your role within the organization and any key responsibilities or projects you're currently working on that are relevant to the meeting's agenda. 

If the meeting includes participants from different departments or organizations, mention how your work relates to theirs or how you might collaborate. Keep your introduction concise and focused, allowing others to understand your role and how it connects to the meeting's objectives.

What are some tips for making a good first impression in a professional setting?

Dress appropriately for the occasion, be punctual, and offer a firm handshake if culturally appropriate. 

Smile and maintain eye contact to convey confidence and approachability. Listen actively and show genuine interest in others by asking relevant questions and engaging in the conversation. Be mindful of your body language to ensure it's open and positive. 

Finally, be prepared with a concise and relevant introduction of yourself, tailored to the context of the meeting or interaction.

Frequenty Asked Questions

resume letter of introduction template

Nathan Thompson

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Introduction Letter: Letter Writing Tips and Samples

resume letter of introduction template

An introduction letter is a formal correspondence written to introduce oneself or a business to a recipient. This letter could be sent to a new client, colleague, or even a potential employer. The importance of an introduction letter cannot be overemphasized. It forms the basis of building new relationships and can be an effective tool in building rapport.

Definition of Introduction Letter

An introduction letter is a type of correspondence that is sent to someone to introduce a person, organization, or business. It could be in response to an inquiry, job posting, or simply to introduce oneself. The letter is usually sent as a way of saying hello and providing the recipient with a brief on who the sender is and what they do.

Importance of Writing an Introduction Letter

An introduction letter can be an effective tool for building new relationships or strengthening existing ones. It sets the tone for future communication and encourages open dialogue. This type of letter can be sent in different circumstances, but it’s especially important when reaching out to new clients, customers, or employers. It can also provide the recipient with a lasting impression of professionalism and attention to detail.

Purpose of an Introduction Letter

The main purpose of an introduction letter is to introduce oneself, organization, or business. It can also be used to seek new opportunities, employment, or funding. The letter is written to facilitate future communication and possibly form a lasting relationship. It is therefore vital to ensure that an introduction letter is well-written, organized, and effective.

Types of Introduction Letters

There are different types of introduction letters, including business introduction letters, personal introduction letters, job application letters, and referral letters. Business introduction letters are sent to customers and clients, while personal introduction letters are sent to friends and acquaintances. A job application letter is used to apply for a job opening, while referral letters are written to introduce someone to a business or organization.

An introduction letter is an effective tool for building relationships and can be used in different situations. When writing an introduction letter, it’s vital to ensure that it’s well-written, organized, and effective. With this comprehensive guide, you now have the necessary knowledge of what an introduction letter is, its importance, purpose, and types.

resume letter of introduction template

Preparing to Write an Introduction Letter

Before writing an introduction letter, it’s important to prepare yourself by researching your target audience, identifying the purpose of your letter, and structuring your letter effectively.

Researching Your Target Audience

Understanding your target audience is crucial to developing a letter that will resonate with them. To research your audience, consider the following:

  • Who is the letter addressed to? Is it an individual, a group, or a company?
  • What is their background and level of expertise in the topic you are writing about?
  • What challenges or problems are they facing that your letter can help solve?
  • What are their interests and values, and how can you align your message with those interests and values?

Answering these questions will help you tailor your introduction letter to your specific audience, making it more engaging and effective.

Identifying the Purpose of Your Letter

The purpose of your introduction letter should be clear from the outset. Are you trying to sell a product, establish a business relationship, or simply introduce yourself and your company? Whatever the purpose, be sure to clearly state it in the opening paragraph of your letter.

Knowing the purpose of your letter can also help you determine what tone and language to use. For example, if you are writing to establish a professional relationship, you may want to use formal language and greetings. If you are introducing a new product, you may want to use more persuasive language and provide compelling reasons why your product is unique and valuable.

Structuring Your Letter

Finally, it’s important to structure your letter in a way that is easy to read and understand. Here are some tips for structuring your letter:

  • Use a clear and concise subject line that summarizes the purpose of your letter
  • Start with a catchy opening sentence that grabs the reader’s attention
  • Clearly and succinctly state the purpose of your letter in the opening paragraph
  • Use short paragraphs and bullet points to break up long blocks of text
  • Provide specific examples or anecdotes to illustrate your points
  • Close with a clear call to action, such as scheduling a meeting or following up with a phone call

By following these tips and structuring your introduction letter effectively, you can increase the chances of a positive response from your target audience.

Elements of an Introduction Letter

When crafting an introduction letter, it is important to include several key elements to ensure that your message is clear, concise, and effective. Here are some essential elements to include in your letter:

Greeting and Opening Sentences

Begin your letter with a courteous greeting, addressing the person or company by name if possible. Use an opening sentence that will grab their attention and set the tone for the rest of your letter.

State Your Purpose with Clarity

Clearly state the purpose of your letter. What do you want to achieve? Are you trying to introduce yourself or your company, promote a new product or service, or request a meeting? Make sure your purpose is clear from the start.

Introduce Yourself or the Company

If you are introducing yourself, briefly explain who you are, your background and qualifications, and what you can offer to the recipient. If you are introducing your company, provide a brief overview of what your company does, its mission and values, and what sets it apart from others in the industry.

Highlight the Benefits

Clearly articulate the benefits of your product, service, or proposition. What makes it unique, valuable, or desirable? Use examples, statistics, or testimonials to support your claims.

resume letter of introduction template

Provide Contact Information

Include your contact information, such as your email address, phone number, website, or social media handles. Encourage the recipient to reach out to you with any questions or feedback.

Closing and Call to Action

End your letter with a courteous closing, such as “Sincerely” or “Best regards,” followed by your name and title. Include a call to action that invites the recipient to take action, such as scheduling a meeting, visiting your website, or placing an order.

By including these key elements in your introduction letter, you can effectively introduce yourself or your company, promote your products or services, and build long-lasting relationships with potential clients or partners.

When it comes to writing an introduction letter, there are several types that you can consider. Each type of introduction letter serves a different purpose and is aimed towards a specific audience. Here are some of the most common types of introduction letters.

Introduction Letter to a Business

An introduction letter to a business is typically written by one business to another. The purpose of this letter is to establish a relationship with the other company, whether it be for partnership opportunities, networking, or a potential business deal. This letter should include an overview of your company and its offerings, as well as an introduction to your point of contact within the business.

Introduction Letter to a New Client

An introduction letter to a new client is an excellent way to make a great first impression. This letter should serve as a warm welcome to your business, outline your services, and demonstrate your commitment to solving their problems. You can also include some relevant industry experience or success stories to guide their expectations.

Introduction Letter to Potential Customers

An introduction letter to potential customers is aimed at attracting new clients. This letter should be persuasive and highlight the benefits of choosing your company over the competition. Additionally, it should provide an overview of your company’s services, mission statement, and unique selling proposition.

Introduction Letter to Potential Employers

An introduction letter to potential employers is an opportunity to showcase your skills and experience to a potential employer. Essentially, it’s a personalized cover letter that should outline your qualifications for a position you’re interested in. This letter should demonstrate your strengths, highlight relevant achievements, and include information about your education and work experience.

Introduction Letter to Potential Partners

An introduction letter to potential partners is ideal for businesses seeking to collaborate with other companies. This letter should provide an overview of your company, including its mission, values, and goals. Additionally, it should outline the benefits of a partnership and how it can benefit both parties.

Introduction Letter to Potential Investors

An introduction letter to potential investors typically accompanies a business proposal, and it’s a way to introduce your business to potential investors. The purpose of this letter is to convince investors that your company is worth investing in, highlighting your business goals and why they should invest in your company. You should also include financial projections and explain the potential return on investment.

Introduction letters are an essential business tool that allows you to establish relationships with other businesses or clients. By following these tips and guidelines, you can create a persuasive and professional introduction letter that effectively communicates your message and objectives.

Tips for Writing a Great Introduction Letter

When it comes to crafting an effective introduction letter, there are several key tips to keep in mind. Here are some of the most important:

Keep it Brief and Concise

One of the biggest mistakes people make when writing an introduction letter is trying to pack too much information into it. Remember, this is just an introduction – you don’t need to cover every detail about yourself or your business. Instead, focus on the key points that will pique your reader’s interest and encourage them to read on. Aim to keep your letter to one page or less.

Focus on Your Target Audience

Another important consideration when writing an introduction letter is who you are writing to. Are you reaching out to potential clients or customers? Partners in the industry? Investors? Different audiences will have different needs and interests, so make sure your letter is tailored accordingly. Consider what’s important to your target audience and how you can speak directly to those concerns.

Use a Professional Tone and Language

Your introduction letter is a representation of you or your business, so it’s important to convey a professional tone. Avoid overly casual language or fluff that detracts from your message. At the same time, don’t be too formal or stuffy. Strive for a tone that is friendly, approachable, and knowledgeable.

Write a Persuasive Letter

The ultimate goal of an introduction letter is to convince your reader to take some sort of action, whether that’s setting up a meeting, trying out your product, or investing in your business. To accomplish this, you’ll need to be persuasive. Make a clear case for why your reader should be interested in what you have to offer, and highlight the key benefits of your product, service, or company.

Use Proper Formatting and Grammar

Finally, be sure to pay attention to the formatting and grammar of your introduction letter. This may seem like a small detail, but it can have a big impact on your reader’s perception of you. Use a clean, easy-to-read font and format your letter for maximum readability. Avoid typos and grammatical errors, as these can make you appear unprofessional.

By following these tips, you’ll be well on your way to writing a great introduction letter that gets results. Remember to keep your letter brief and focused, tailor it to your target audience, use a professional tone and language, be persuasive, and use proper formatting and grammar.

Mistakes to Avoid While Writing an Introduction Letter

When it comes to writing an introduction letter, there are several pitfalls you should avoid if you want your message to be effective. Below are some common mistakes that should be avoided at all costs:

Avoid Grammatical and Spelling Errors Grammar and spelling errors can make your letter look unprofessional and careless. Before sending your introduction letter, make sure you proofread it carefully or even have someone else check it for you.

Do not Use Complex Words Using complex words might make you look smart, but it can also confuse your reader. Keep your language simple and straightforward to ensure your message is understood.

Do not Make False Claims Be honest and truthful when writing your introduction letter. Avoid making false claims or exaggerating your accomplishments as it can damage your credibility and reputation.

Do not Send Generic Introduction Letters Sending a generic introduction letter can make it seem like you’re not invested in building a meaningful connection with the recipient. Take the time to personalize your letter and make it relevant to the person or company you’re reaching out to.

By avoiding these mistakes, you can increase the chances of your introduction letter being well-received and effective.

Example Introduction Letters

In this section, we will provide you with sample introduction letters that you can use as a reference when creating your own. Whether you need to introduce your business to another company, a new client, or potential customers, these samples will give you an idea of how to structure your introduction letter and what information to include.

Sample Introduction Letter to a Business

Dear [Contact Name],

I am writing to introduce myself and my company [Your Company Name]. We specialize in [Your Company’s Services or Products] and have been in business for [Number of Years] years, serving clients in [Your Target Markets].

I came across your business through [Source] and was impressed with your work in [Insert Reason]. I believe that [Your Company Name] and [Client’s Company Name] can work together to [Insert Benefit].

I look forward to discussing how we can collaborate and help each other grow our businesses. Please let me know if you are available for a call or meeting.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

[Your Name]

Sample Introduction Letter to a New Client

Dear [Client’s Name],

I am writing to introduce myself as your new account manager at [Your Company Name]. I am excited to work with you and help you achieve your business goals.

At [Your Company Name], we specialize in [Your Company’s Services or Products] and have a successful track record of helping clients like you improve their [Insert Key Metric].

I would love to schedule a meeting to discuss your current goals and how we can help you achieve them. Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Thank you for the opportunity to work with you.

Best regards,

Sample Introduction Letter to Potential Customers

Dear [Customer’s Name],

I am writing to introduce you to [Your Company Name]. We specialize in [Your Company’s Services or Products] and are committed to providing our customers with the best possible service and products.

We noticed that you have shown interest in [Related Product or Service] and thought that you might be interested in our [Insert Relevant Product or Service]. Our [Product or Service] has received positive feedback from our customers and has helped them [Insert Key Benefit].

If you have any questions or would like to learn more about our offerings, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sample Introduction Letter to Potential Employers

Dear [Employer’s Name],

I am writing to express my interest in [Job Title] at [Employer’s Company Name]. I was impressed with your company’s mission and values and believe that I would be a great fit for your team.

I have [Insert Years of Experience] years of experience in [Related Field] and have a successful track record of [Enter Relevant Accomplishments].

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A+ Resumes for Teachers Logo

How to Write an A+ Letter of Introduction to Communicate Passion

Writing an excellent letter of introduction will help to get your education resume selected and read. Landing an interview is the first big step to securing a new teaching or administration position.

While your resume needs to be strong and well-written to intrigue the audience, you also need a perfect letter of introduction to get your resume read in the first place.

Writing an A+ letter of introduction requires replacing the formulaic job cover letter text with prose to convey your true passion for teaching. In my experience as a teacher resume coach, the introduction that will attract the hiring manager's attention shares several components. By following these cover letter writing tips you should move towards landing a wonderful teaching post.

Write a Letter of Introduction to Communicate Passion

Ultimate Tips for Writing a Teacher Letter of Introduction

The letter of introduction writing tips would apply to many roles and job titles in education. So whether you are a primary teacher, fresher teacher, veteran teacher, teacher assistant, instructional coach, curriculum developer or the superintendent of the school district these tips should provide help. 

Show Your Passion for Teaching

Administrators are looking for teachers who are passionate about teaching because they make the best teachers. Anyone can write a simple cover letter, but an attention-grabbing cover letter that gets you noticed should show your personality and love for teaching.

Write a List of Keywords That Show Passion

Use exciting language (not scientific words) to describe your qualifications. Start by writing a list of keywords, skills and experiences you feel communicate and demonstrate your passion for teaching.

Here are some examples of personality attributes: empathetic, generous, patient, responsive, confident, committed, enthusiastic, energetic, resourceful, industrious, productive, innovative, and inventive.

Bullet points:

  • Empathetic educator dedicated to nurturing and developing the whole person
  • Highly responsive to individual learner needs (e.g., develop customized learning programs for each student) 
  • Enthusiastically introduced three new science lab learning programs, receiving unprecedented funding for all projects
  • Committed and energetic teacher who organizes at least two outdoor classes a week to connect students with the natural world

These examples taken from an education program specialist cover letter and special education coordinator cover letter provide important evidence of soft skills. Points 3, 4 and 5 are the most impactful because they provide examples of what is being claimed.

It doesn't hurt to learn more about how to use teacher keywords and teaching skills in a cover letter and resume.

Show Value in Your Concise Cover Letter

Once you have developed phrasing that pulls in the reader by communicating your ardent passion for your teaching job, you want to avoid watering down these key points in an overly wordy letter. The structure of a cover letter is as important as its content. The more concise you are the higher impact you will make.  

Ideally, it should contain a maximum of three paragraphs, and it must fit onto one page while allowing room for your signature at the bottom of the page. Pay as much attention to writing your teacher letter of introduction as you do to the resume. Many times, people spend days or even weeks perfecting their resume only to produce a cover letter that was thrown together in a few minutes.

Communicate Confidence

A teacher who is happy and fulfilled in his/her teaching position exudes confidence. Use positive and action keywords to create an upbeat tone. Providing examples of your claims demonstrates your effectiveness. If you have introduced a new reading app or teaching technique to the classroom, provide examples and/or quantitative evidence of its effectiveness.

Be Truthful and Honest

A letter of introduction that shows passion must be heartfelt and genuine. Do not get swept away by your passion for teaching and start exaggerating your claim to fame. A letter that provides a truthful and positive picture of your experience and skills will come across as authentic, and ideally move the reader.

Match the School District's Requirements

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Passion is what we call a 'soft skill.' Soft skills can be harder to demonstrate than, say, hard sales skills, in which numbers provide evidence of your capabilities. As the above keyword bullet points demonstrate, there are many ways to provide evidence of your passion for teaching. You will be less convincing if you provide an isolated list of passionate skills:

Generous, empathetic, compassionate, sympathetic teacher.

Compare the above statement with the following:

Empathetic primary teacher who introduced after school learning programs to focus on individual student's special learning needs.

  • Produced a 10% improvement in reading and writing skills
  • Achieved a 15% increase in class attendance records  

Think of passionate keywords as adjectives and adverbs that can infuse some passion into your teaching duties and achievements.

Ignite Reader's Interest

Make the hiring authority want to learn more about you by reading your resume. Researching the school and district will help you stimulate interest by targeting what your readership is looking for in a teacher. Create a new application letter for each teaching job for which you apply. This allows you to customize the letter for each particular school. Try to include information that shows you have researched the school and know something about it.

For example, you may be giving little attention to teaching programs and techniques the school is currently investing in developing. Did your passion for this program help you produce district-leading results? Tell the school upfront how you can help them improve the performance of their program. This is a good example of the benefits of personalizing each cover letter and resume.

Use the Hiring Person's Name

Whenever possible, it's important to address the cover letter to an individual rather than "To Whom it May Concern:" or "Dear Sir." Proper cover letter etiquette requires that you always use the last name: 'Dear Mrs. Smith.'

If you can't find a person's name to address the cover letter, you could use: Dear Hiring Manager: Dear Recruitment Manager: Dear Hiring Committee: Dear Human Resource Team: Dear Recruitment Representative: Dear Human Resource Director:

Always show respect by using 'Dr.' for a person with a doctorate, if they commonly use the title in their name. For example, Dr. John Smith, Dean of ABC School should always be addressed as 'Dear Dr. Smith.' While he will likely call you by your first name in an interview, always maintain decorum and use 'Dr. Smith' in written and oral communications.  

If you feel your passion for teaching is not demonstrated in your daily teaching job, an education career coach can help you become the teacher you have always envisioned yourself. Often times, teachers feel constrained by prescribed teaching program and curriculum and can benefit from thinking creatively and out-of-the-box.

Attention to Detail - Dot Your I's

It is a waste of time to infuse your cover letter with your passion for teaching and then send a photocopied letter and signature.

Before sending your cover letter:

  • Always sign every one of your letters of introduction individually. Never send a copy of the letter. School administrators can tell when you've used a standard letter instead of writing a new cover letter. Sending a copy will give an employer the idea that you are lazy and do not care enough to produce an original document.
  • Triple check for spelling and grammatical errors. A teaching position calls for impeccable literacy skills; therefore, you need to make certain that your cover letter is always checked for errors.
  • Review it, check it, check it again, and then check it once more for information and errors.  Make sure at least two other people proofread it.

You can find many examples of teachers who convey passion for their teaching jobs by reviewing our teacher resume and cover letter examples .

You can review more tips on education cover letter writing .  

Our guidance on how to write your academic CV curriculum vitae has helped thousands of teachers find jobs.

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What is a Letter of Intent? How to Write One for a Job [+ Examples]

Stephanie Trovato

Published: March 14, 2024

Standard job applications have a standard set of practices. You turn in a resume and cover letter, and then, if selected, you move through a few rounds of interviews and get the job.

person at their computer writing a letter of intent

However, not all potential job opportunities start with an application. In fact, many begin with initiative from a job seeker.

Free Kit: Everything You Need for Your Job Search

Those job seekers will send in a letter of intent rather than a  cover letter . In this article, we’ll take a look at what a letter of intent is and highlight some strategies for writing the best LOI you can. We’ve even included a template to help you get started. 

Here’s what you’ll find:

What is a letter of intent?

Letter of intent vs. cover letter, letter of intent vs. letter of interest, when to use a letter of intent.

How to Write a Letter of Intent for a Job

Letter of Intent Samples

Letter of intent template.

A letter of intent is a less common way of expressing interest in a company. It targets reasons you’re looking for opportunities with a specific organization.

A letter of intent does include elements of a traditional cover letter, such as relevant experience and skills, but it’s used in slightly different contexts. LOIs emphasize alignment between a job seeker and an organization.

letter of intent example for Publishing Now

There are a few key differences between a  cover letter  and a letter of intent, including:

Context. While a cover letter responds to a specific job listing, a letter of intent targets an organization more generally. It may or may not have a specific job opening at the time that the LOI is sent in.

Focus. A cover letter explains why an applicant is a  good fit for a specific role . An LOI, on the other hand, addresses an individual’s compatibility with an overall organization or more general role.

Initiative. A cover letter is a reactive document responding to a job opening. A letter of intent, however, demonstrates more initiative and provides information before an organization specifically requests it.

resume letter of introduction template

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Letter of intent and  letter of interest  are often used interchangeably. While there are a lot of similarities between the two documents, there are also a few key differences:

Level of intent. Letters of intent have a high level of intentionality, while letters of interest are more exploratory. A letter of intent proposes action, while letters of interest are for information gathering.

Commitment level. A letter of intent is a high-commitment way of expressing interest in a company, while a letter of interest is a lower commitment. An individual is more likely to send out multiple letters of interest. 

Action orientation. A letter of intent always ends with a call to action, while a letter of interest is more laid-back and may not request anything specific from the recipient.

While both letters demonstrate initiative and are closely tailored to the company, they do serve slightly different purposes.

There are lots of scenarios where a job seeker may want to send out a letter of intent. Here are a few examples: 

You have a high level of interest in a specific company, but there’s not an open role.

You are interested in networking with a company in a committed way.

You want to reach out with a formal follow-up after a networking event.

You’re applying to a highly competitive field.

You’re aware of a potential job opportunity with an organization that hasn’t been published yet.

Additionally, students or job seekers switching industries may use letters of intent to apply to educational opportunities like internships and apprenticeships — though those may also be called  cover letters . 

when to use a letter of intent

How to Write a Letter of Intent

There are plenty of ways to approach writing a letter of intent for a job. Here’s a step-by-step process for writing your LOI draft:

1. Provide your contact information.  

At the top of your LOI, you’ll want to provide contact information so your recipient can contact you about future opportunities. This can include your phone number, email, and address.

2. Use an appropriate greeting.

For some opportunities, a formal greeting is appropriate. In other situations, a more informal approach may be ideal. If possible, address the specific recipient. 

3. Provide an introduction.  

In the intro paragraphs, you’ll want to tap into three specifics:

Who you are.

Why you’re reaching out.

How you got this company’s information.

Feel free to vary the order of this information. Your LOI intro may be formal or more playful, depending on who you are and the organization you’re submitting to.

4. Dive into your strengths and company alignment.  

An LOI is created to clearly convey why you’re a good fit for the organization. In the body paragraphs of your letter, you’ll want to explain:

  • Your strengths.
  • What you do.
  • How those things would fit with the organization.

5. Guide the conversation into the future.  

All LOIs end with a call to action, which is one of the things that differentiates it from a letter of interest or a cover letter. Map out potential next steps so it’s easy for the reader to take action. It could include:

A request to schedule a meeting.

Making a specific pitch.

Encouraging the recipient to send a follow-up email.

6. Write a thoughtful conclusion .

Conclude your LOI by reiterating your interest in the company. Make sure to thank the recipient for their time, too — there wasn’t a job opening request, so they took time out of their day to read your letter.

If you’re sending your LOI because of an internal referral, be sure to reference them within the letter. 

how to write a letter of intent

Let’s go through a few different samples of LOIs and highlight what each does well. Refer to these samples as you draft your own letter of intent for guidance on incorporating the elements of an LOI seamlessly.

Internal Connection

Dear Mr. Waterhouse, My name is Jennifer Orlando, and I am an accomplished sommelier with a decade of experience. I recently enjoyed a glass at your wine bar, and I would love to chat with you more if you’re hiring soon. My colleague, Jackson Marymount, has worked at Italiano Wine Bar for several years and highly recommends working with your organization. I have a wine service background and a Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) Level 3 certification. I’m passionate about Italian wines — Nebbiolos are my favorite! Jackson says you’re a fan, as well. My passion for Italian wines, combined with my experience, make me a great candidate for Italiano Wine Bar if you’re ever in need of an extra hand. I appreciate you taking the time to read my letter today, and if you’d like to chat further, please email me, and we can schedule a time to sit down together. Thank you again for your time. Warm regards, Jennifer

In this letter of intent, Jennifer leverages an internal connection. This is a great way to earn a few extra points when explaining how you know about the business. Beyond that, Jennifer’s experiences align well with the work that the wine bar does.

What I like:  This letter of intent does a great job of personalization, weaving through the internal connection perfectly in a few different spots. A referral is a powerful aid to incorporate into an LOI, and Jennifer did a great job dropping hints of her connection.

Making a Pitch

Dear Elise, My name is Mark Morgan, and I’m a freelance graphic designer with a passion for bold marketing materials. I found your marketing company while on LinkedIn the other day, and I would love to collaborate with you in the future. As I read up on your company, I discovered a lot of similarities between my work and your organization. I, too, advocate for bright and forward advertising, and creating smart and attractive ads is my specialty. While I noticed you don’t have any posted project needs at this time, I was browsing your offerings and saw an opportunity to bolster your products. Your “Full-Stack Ad Copywriting” package covers strategy and copy, but it doesn’t offer graphic design. I’d love to bring my skills to the table to supplement your product. If you’d like to chat further, please shoot me an email, and we’ll set up a time to discuss potential collaboration. Thanks so much for taking the time to read my letter. Take care, Mark

What I like:  In this letter, Mark is making a pitch. He still covers the bases of a great LOI — discussing his strengths and alignment with the brand. But instead of just calling for a meeting, he makes a pitch that is specific to the organization. This provides value to the recipient and makes Mark look like a strong collaborator. 

Mark could benefit from HubSpot’s CMS Hub to manage his pitches. Lead generation and content creation are important parts of freelancing, and Mark needs to stay organized in order to do it well. Learn more about  HubSpot’s CMS Hub here .

Diving Into Alignment

Dear Michael, My name is Jordan, and I’m a non-profit manager. I’m reaching out today because I discovered your organization through one of my colleagues. I’d love to see if you’re in need of any managerial services. My values are in close alignment with the values of Trees 4 Life Canada. I’m dedicated to service and passionately believe saving the trees is one of the best ways we can save the world. I studied agriculture in college and have since dedicated my professional life to collaboration with tree nonprofits. If you’re seeking a manager in the near future, I’d love to be considered for the role. With my experience and alignment with your values, I’d surely be a great fit. Please feel free to send me an email at jordanlovestrees@example.com. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Jordan

Letters of intent are standard documents, so you don’t need to worry about reinventing the wheel each time you send one. Use this template as a resource to ensure your letter includes all the important parts.

[Your name]

[Your contact information]

[Recipient’s Name]

[Recipient’s contact information]

Dear  [Recipient or To Whom It May Concern] ,

My name is  [Your Name] ,  [title/relevant information about yourself] , and I heard about your organization through  [how you know the organization] . I’m reaching out to connect. I would love to chat if your team plans on expanding.

I have skills in  [skills]  that I believe would be a great fit for your organization. Your values of  [company values]  are in close alignment with my strengths, and I believe I could make a great contribution.

I believe that my  [abilities/skills/interests]  would benefit your company, and I’d love to talk more about any potential opportunities that arise with  [name of organization] . If interested, please reach out by  [phone/email]  to schedule a time to meet with me.

Thank you for taking the time to read my letter, and I hope to talk with you further in the future.

Of course, you’ll want to edit the template for tone and specifics related to yourself and the organization you’re contacting. 

Finding Success With a Great Letter of Intent

Sending a letter of intent can be vulnerable, but it’s a great way to make new connections and set yourself up for employment success.

Refer to these strategies, samples, and templates to make sure your LOI is going to be the most effective letter possible. Emphasize your alignment with the organization, and you’re sure to see success!

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