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Essay on Musical Instruments

Students are often asked to write an essay on Musical Instruments in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Musical Instruments

What are musical instruments.

Musical instruments are tools that make sounds. People play them to create music. Some are old, like drums and flutes, and some are new, like electronic keyboards. Instruments can be simple, like a shaker, or complex, like a piano.

Types of Instruments

There are many kinds of instruments. They are often grouped by how they make sound. String instruments use strings, wind instruments need air, and percussion instruments make noise when hit. Keyboard and electronic instruments are also popular.

Learning to Play

Playing an instrument takes practice. Many start learning at school or with a teacher. It’s fun and can be a hobby or a job. Playing music helps with learning and brings joy.

Instruments in Culture

Instruments are important in culture. They are used in celebrations, religious events, and for entertainment. Each country has unique instruments that make their music special. Instruments help keep traditions alive.

250 Words Essay on Musical Instruments

Musical instruments are tools that people use to create music. Just like a painter uses a brush to paint pictures, musicians use instruments to make sounds. There are many kinds of musical instruments, and they come in all shapes and sizes. Some are small enough to fit in your pocket, like a harmonica, while others are so big they fill up a whole room, like a pipe organ.

Types of Musical Instruments

Instruments are often grouped by how they make sound. String instruments, like guitars and violins, have strings that you pluck or bow to make music. Wind instruments, such as flutes and trumpets, need air blown into them. Percussion instruments, like drums and tambourines, make sounds when you hit them. Finally, keyboard instruments, like pianos and electronic keyboards, have keys that you press to create notes.

Playing an instrument takes practice. At first, it might be tough to make a nice sound, but with time, you can learn to play songs. Some people take lessons with a teacher, while others teach themselves. Playing an instrument can be a fun hobby and a great way to express yourself.

Music Brings Us Together

Music is a language that everyone can understand, and instruments are the tools we use to speak that language. They help us to share our feelings, celebrate, and come together. Whether in a big concert or a small gathering at home, musical instruments add joy and excitement to our lives.

500 Words Essay on Musical Instruments

Musical instruments are tools that people use to make music. Just like a painter uses a brush to paint pictures, musicians use instruments to create sounds. There are many kinds of musical instruments, and each one can make different noises. Some are played by hitting them, like drums. Others are played by blowing air through them, like flutes. There are also instruments that make sound when you pull strings, like guitars.

Learning to Play an Instrument

Playing an instrument can be fun, but it also takes practice. When you learn, you start with simple notes and rhythms. As you get better, you can play harder pieces of music. Many schools have music classes where students can learn to play. Some kids also take lessons outside of school from a music teacher. It’s important to practice regularly if you want to improve.

The History of Musical Instruments

Musical instruments have been around for a very long time. Thousands of years ago, people made instruments from natural materials like wood, bone, and stone. Over time, as people learned more about music and making things, instruments became more complex. For example, early flutes were just hollow tubes, but now they have keys and parts that make them easier to play and sound better.

Musical Instruments Around the World

The role of instruments in music.

Instruments add beauty and feeling to music. They can be loud or soft, high or low. When many instruments play together, like in an orchestra, they can make a big, rich sound. Each instrument has its own part, but when they all play together, it’s like they’re having a conversation in the language of music.

Musical instruments are a big part of what makes music so wonderful. They come in all shapes and sizes and can make all kinds of sounds. Learning to play an instrument is a skill that can bring a lot of joy. Whether it’s the beating of a drum or the melody from a violin, instruments help us tell stories and express feelings through music.

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essay musical instruments learn

How to do IELTS

IELTS Essay: Musical Instruments

by Dave | Real Past Tests | 5 Comments

IELTS Essay: Musical Instruments

This is an IELTS writing task 2 sample answer essay on the topic of whether or not every child should be taught to play a musical instrument.

If you are enjoying my free essays, please consider supporting me and sharing with your friends about my Patreon here (and getting access to additional, exclusive materials and Ebooks!).

IELTS Essay: Education

Some educators believe that every child should be taught how to play a musical instrument.

To what extent do you agree or disagree?

Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an indispensable part of a student’s education. In my opinion, there are socioeconomic concerns with this tenet but it is still advisable overall.

Detractors can easily argue not every child has access to the supportive environment required to learn an instrument. Firstly, a family might not have enough money if a child wants to learn piano or buy a quality guitar. There are also related expenses that include the fees for private lessons and other equipment. Added to this, they will need their parents to have enough time to drive them to and from rehearsals and recitals. At home, the entire family will have to listen to them practice and this could be contentious if there are a lot of people living in one home or a child shares their room with siblings or relatives. All these factors affect underprivileged children and place them at a decided disadvantage.

Nonetheless, the above issues can be mitigated with more funding for schools and the developmental benefits of music outweigh all other concerns. Research has shown that in early development, physical changes take place in the brains of both children and adolescents. Some of these relate to music and children who take up an instrument, even if they quit later, have demonstrated improved cognitive flexibility and creativity in longitudinal studies across a variety of cultural backgrounds. Apart from the scientific grounding, it also common sense that children will feel more fulfilled and derive a lot of joy from playing music. This can provide a boost to not only academics but also their long-term mental well-being.

In conclusion, though policymakers will have to account for accessibility issues, learning an instrument is key for neurodevelopment. Schools, parents, and teachers should work together to ensure the best chances of success.

1. Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an indispensable part of a student’s education. 2. In my opinion, there are socioeconomic concerns with this tenet but it is still advisable overall.

  • Paraphrase the overall essay topic.
  • Write a clear opinion. Read more about introductions here .

1. Detractors can easily argue not every child has access to the supportive environment required to learn an instrument. 2. Firstly, a family might not have enough money if a child wants to learn piano or buy a quality guitar. 3. There are also related expenses that include the fees for private lessons and other equipment. 4. Added to this, they will need their parents to have enough time to drive them to and from rehearsals and recitals. 5. At home, the entire family will have to listen to them practice and this could be contentious if there are a lot of people living in one home or a child shares their room with siblings or relatives. 6. All these factors affect underprivileged children and place them at a decided disadvantage.

  • Write a clear topic sentence with your main idea at the end.
  • Begin to develop your main idea.
  • Use a real or hypothetical example.
  • Add more detail to fully support your main idea.
  • Don’t switch to a new main idea.
  • Finish with a summary.

1. Nonetheless, the above issues can be mitigated with more funding for schools and the developmental benefits of music outweigh all other concerns. 2. Research has shown that in early development, physical changes take place in the brains of both children and adolescents. 3. Some of these relate to music and children who take up an instrument, even if they quit later, have demonstrated improved cognitive flexibility and creativity in longitudinal studies across a variety of cultural backgrounds. 4. Apart from the scientific grounding, it also common sense that children will feel more fulfilled and derive a lot of joy from playing music. 5. This can provide a boost to not only academics but also their long-term mental well-being.

  • Write another topic sentence with a clear main idea at the end.
  • Use research to support your idea.
  • Develop the research.
  • Add in more detail if possible.
  • Conclude with a strong statement.

1. In conclusion, though policymakers will have to account for accessibility issues, learning an instrument is key for neurodevelopment. 2. Schools, parents, and teachers should work together to ensure the best chances of success.

  • Repeat your opinion and summarise your main ideas.
  • Add a final thought. Read more about conclusions here .

What do the words in bold below mean?

Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an indispensable part of a student’s education. In my opinion, there are socioeconomic concerns with this tenet but it is still advisable overall .

Detractors can easily argue not every child has access to the supportive environment required to learn an instrument. Firstly , a family might not have enough money if a child wants to learn piano or buy a quality guitar . There are also related expenses that include the fees for private lessons and other equipment . Added to this , they will need their parents to have enough time to drive them to and from rehearsals and recitals . At home, the entire family will have to listen to them practice and this could be contentious if there are a lot of people living in one home or a child shares their room with siblings or relatives. All these factors affect underprivileged children and place them at a decided disadvantage .

Nonetheless , the above issues can be mitigated with more funding for schools and the developmental benefits of music outweigh all other concerns . Research has shown that in early development , physical changes take place in the brains of both children and adolescents . Some of these relate to music and children who take up an instrument, even if they quit later, have demonstrated improved cognitive flexibility and creativity in longitudinal studies across a variety of cultural backgrounds . Apart from the scientific grounding , it also common sense that children will feel more fulfilled and derive a lot of joy from playing music. This can provide a boost to not only academics but also their long-term mental well-being .

In conclusion, though policymakers will have to account for accessibility issues , learning an instrument is key for neurodevelopment . Schools, parents, and teachers should work together to ensure the best chances of success .

indispensable crucial

socioeconomic concerns questions about class

tenet principle

advisable overall in general good

detractors critics

easily argue point out effortlessly

access to can get to

supportive environment required good family support

firstly first of all

quality guitar good guitar

related expenses other money that must be spent

private lessons one on one lessons

other equipment other musical items

added to this moreover

rehearsals practicing

recitals a mini-concert

entire family whole family

contentious controversial

shares their room with live in the same room

factors elements

underprivileged children poor kids

place them at a decided disadvantage definitely worse off

nonetheless regardless

mitigated somewhat countered by

funding money for

developmental benefits positive impact on how they grow up

outweigh all other concerns more important

in early development as kids

take place happen

adolescents teenagers

relate to have to do with

take up start

demonstrated improved cognitive flexibility smarter

longitudinal studies research over many years

cultural backgrounds where someone comes from

apart from besides

scientific grounding research basis

feel more fulfilled feel satisfied

derive get from

provide a boost increase

not only … but also also includes

long-term mental well-being mental health

policymakers politicians

account for accessibility issues think about providing it for all

key important

neurodevelopment brain development

work together collaborate

ensure make sure

best chances of success will likely work out

Pronunciation

ˌɪndɪsˈpɛnsəbl   ˌsəʊsɪəʊˌɛkəˈnɒmɪk kənˈsɜːnz   ˈtiːnɛt   ədˈvaɪzəbl ˈəʊvərɔːl dɪˈtræktəz   ˈiːzɪli ˈɑːgjuː   ˈæksɛs tuː   səˈpɔːtɪv ɪnˈvaɪərənmənt rɪˈkwaɪəd   ˈfɜːstli ˈkwɒlɪti gɪˈtɑː rɪˈleɪtɪd ɪksˈpɛnsɪz   fiːz   ˈpraɪvɪt ˈlɛsnz   ˈʌðər ɪˈkwɪpmənt ˈædɪd tuː ðɪs rɪˈhɜːsəlz   rɪˈsaɪtlz ɪnˈtaɪə ˈfæmɪli   kənˈtɛnʃəs   ʃeəz ðeə ruːm wɪð   ˈfæktəz   ˌʌndəˈprɪvɪlɪʤd ˈʧɪldrən   pleɪs ðɛm æt ə dɪˈsaɪdɪd ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪʤ ˌnʌnðəˈlɛs ˈmɪtɪgeɪtɪd   ˈfʌndɪŋ   dɪˌvɛləpˈmɛntl ˈbɛnɪfɪts   aʊtˈweɪ ɔːl ˈʌðə kənˈsɜːnz ɪn ˈɜːli dɪˈvɛləpmənt teɪk pleɪs   ˌædəʊˈlɛsnts rɪˈleɪt tuː   teɪk ʌp   kwɪt   ˈdɛmənstreɪtɪd ɪmˈpruːvd ˈkɒgnɪtɪv ˌflɛksɪˈbɪlɪti   ˌlɒnʤɪˈtjuːdɪnl ˈstʌdiz   ˈkʌlʧərəl ˈbækgraʊndz əˈpɑːt frɒm   ˌsaɪənˈtɪfɪk ˈgraʊndɪŋ fiːl mɔː fʊlˈfɪld   dɪˈraɪv   prəˈvaɪd ə buːst   nɒt ˈəʊnli   bʌt ˈɔːlsəʊ   ˈlɒŋtɜːm ˈmɛntl wɛl-ˈbiːɪŋ policymakers   əˈkaʊnt fɔːr əkˌsɛsɪˈbɪlɪti ˈɪʃuːz kiː   neurodevelopment wɜːk təˈgɛðə   ɪnˈʃʊə   bɛst ˈʧɑːnsɪz ɒv səkˈsɛs

Vocabulary Practice

Remember and fill in the blanks:

Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an i_________________e part of a student’s education. In my opinion, there are s_____________________s with this t_______t but it is still a__________________l .

D_______________s can e____________e not every child has a___________o the s___________________________________d to learn an instrument. F__________y , a family might not have enough money if a child wants to learn piano or buy a q_______________r . There are also r________________s that include the f____s for p_________________s and o_________________t . A_________________s , they will need their parents to have enough time to drive them to and from r______________s and r____________s . At home, the e______________y will have to listen to them practice and this could be c______________s if there are a lot of people living in one home or a child s_______________________h siblings or relatives. All these f__________s affect u__________________________n and p_______________________________________e .

N____________________s , the above issues can be m______________d with more f____________g for schools and the d_______________________s of music o____________________________s . Research has shown that i_____________________________t , physical changes t____________e in the brains of both children and a_________________s . Some of these r__________o music and children who t__________p an instrument, even if they q____t later, have d__________________________________________y and creativity in l_______________________s across a variety of c____________________s . A____________m the s_____________________g , it also common sense that children will f____________________d and d_________e a lot of joy from playing music. This can p________________t to n_____________y academics b__________o their l________________________________g .

In conclusion, though p__________________s will have to a_____________________________s , learning an instrument is k___y for n____________________________t . Schools, parents, and teachers should w_________________________r to e_____________e the b________________________s .

Listening Practice

Listen about this topic below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0JKCYZ8hng

Reading Practice

Do some extra reading on this topic below as well:

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/08/19/making-music-from-the-mets-forgotten-treasures

Speaking Practice

Practice with the following questions from the real IELTS speaking exam :

  • Do you like music?
  • Which types of music do you like?
  • Would you like to learn a musical instrument?
  • Do you prefer listening to music by yourself or with someone else?

Writing Practice

Write about the following related topic then check with my sample answer below:

Many people believe that music is just a form of entertainment, whilst others believe that music has a much larger impact on society today.

Discuss both views and give your own opinion. 

IELTS Writing Task 2 Sample Answer Essay: Music & Society (Real Past IELTS Exam/Test)

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Anonymous

Wow Thinks a lot

Lola

I think that inclusion in education /school programs music lessons are necessary because, firstly, to learn playing musical instruments takes a lot of time, secondly, child maybe  is not interested in it. Pupils spend heaps of time learning how to play musical instruments, instead of studying such important subjects as chemistry, physics and grammar etc. To support this opinion/argument/view, children will spend the majority of their time on music, thus, they will be tired and have no time for the above mentioned subjects. Moreover, not all children are interested in music. Inclusion music lessons in school programs in obligatory form will have negative consequence /results such as dislike, stress recording to the music.   In conclusion, in my opinion, music lessons should not be an obligatory part of education/school programs because playing musical instruments takes a lot of time and maybe not all children are not interested in it.

Dave

Good ideas, Lola!

Try to copy the strucutre – sentence by sentence – from my sample answer.

Your writing should be a bit longer, especially each individual paragraph.

Mike

Thanks Dave! 🙂 Many teachers are of the opinion that learning to play a musical instrument should be an indispensable part of children’s education. I personally disagree with this idea as it can be impractical for children with economically disadvantaged conditions and wreak havoc on their health and academic performance. The argument in favor of encouraging children to take up a musical instrument is based on scientific research. First, studies have shown that both physical and mental changes often take place in the brains of individuals at the early stages of their lives. This means that learning how to play an instrument at an early age is likely to facilitate improvements in individuals’ cognitive and creative development. Second, spending numerous hours trying to excel at playing an instrument among children can not only teach them the values of hard work and perseverance but also instill in them a sense of fulfillment. This possibly is of enormous use for both their academics and long-term mental well-being.    Nonetheless, I claim that learning to play an instrument at an early age may impose unnecessary burdens on children. The truth is that children nowadays already suffer from stress because of their intense academic pressure. This indicates that if forced to learn musical lessons, chances are they may be overwhelmed, potentially hurting both their health and academic performance. This may also lead to them harboring resentment towards their teachers or parents, possibly resulting in them either neglecting their studies or, in extreme cases, dropping out of school. Furthermore, a family might not have enough money to afford a musical instrument such as a piano or a high-quality guitar. The expenses also include private lessons and other equipment, which appear prohibitively expensive for many, especially the underprivileged. In conclusion, despite the undeniable benefits, I am strongly convinced that children should not be educated to play a musical instrument as it imposes both financial and mental burdens for them.

Nice work again, Mike!

Really good topic sentences – simple and clear. You also link your ideas really well in your paragraphs – students can learn a lot from this example of yours!

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Argumentative Essay Example: All Students Should Learn a Musical Instrument

📌Category: ,
📌Words: 504
📌Pages: 2
📌Published: 05 August 2022

“The number of adults who wish they knew how to play the piano is more than ten times the number who actually do play” (Hidden Benefits). This is a startling statistic as many students growing up had not seen the benefits of learning an Instrument, because they never had the opportunity. Students presently have become lazy saying, learning an instrument is too hard, and have forgotten the many concealed advantages of learning an instrument. So many today are passing through Schooling learning Math, English, Science, History, and never given the opportunity to learn an Instrument. Therefore, all students should learn a musical instrument.” 

First, all students should learn a musical instrument because it builds character. 

Learning anything in life has its ups and downs, but once mastered the reward of satisfaction far outways the beginning struggles. “Hard Work” is a valued lesson for any student to learn for life. According to “The Hidden Benefits” (1985,6), in American Music teachers, teachers are now placing more emphasis on students’ “self-satisfaction” of learning more than how successful the music is. If a student feels discouraged in his training, and feels playing an instrument is not for him, then he will at least know he tried. So many Adults out there have never tried yet would love to have the knowledge now of how to play an Instrument. For students learning an instrument, will help them grow as a person, and in their life skills. 

Second, all students should learn a musical instrument because it improves cognitive function. Learning a musical instrument helps improve mental concentration, the ability to hold up under stress, memory skills, and reading ability. Frank R Wilson, a San Francisco neurologist (Hidden Benefits) unearthed that learning music had a positive outcome on both the body and the human brain, including that all kids have enough mental capacity to master any Instrument. An instrument may also have the opposite effect of stress on them. In their daily lives playing instruments allows them to take a break from daily stress and focus on something else. Music throughout time has been one of the greatest stress relievers for man to use, allowing a more positive mindset. A clear mind allows for a more efficient and effective mindset for a student during his studies. 

Third, all students should learn a musical instrument because it is beneficial for the steps of daily life. Dr. Wilson states “"Humans are special physically because of the exceptional control we have over the muscles of our hands, mouth, and face and because of the bonding of these gifts to our powers of communication," Learning an instrument helps train a student in their ability to communicate with their piers around them at such a crucial time. Once a student is able to master an instrument they will have a sense of self-satisfaction, and thankfulness that they ended up learning one. 

All students should take time to learn an instrument, so that they build character, improve brain power, and train everyday life skills. Simply as students their goal is to learn, and no better way to get started in a musical journey then a few basic lessons. Ultimately as the old saying goes you never know till you try, and the majority of adults today that never tried regret it.

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What My Musical Instruments Have Taught Me

A cello leans against an upright piano

“Waves Only Get Real When They Break,” by Colin Farish (piano), Jaron Lanier (guzheng), and Jhaffur Khan (flute).

It started after my mother died. She was a concentration-camp survivor—a prodigy concert pianist in Vienna who was taken when she was only a girl. She taught me the piano by holding her hands over mine, bending my fingers into arches above the keys. When I was just a boy, she died in a car accident. Afterward, I was both boundlessly angry and attached to the piano. I played it with extreme force, sometimes bleeding onto the keys. I still feel her hands when I play. I feel them even more when I’m learning a new instrument.

As I write this, on a laptop in my kitchen, I can see at least a hundred instruments around me. There’s a Baroque guitar; some Colombian gaita flutes; a French musical saw; a shourangiz (a Persian instrument resembling a traditional poet’s lute); an Array mbira (a giant chromatic thumb piano, made in San Diego); a Turkish clarinet; and a Chinese guqin. A reproduction of an ancient Celtic harp sits near some giant penny whistles, a tar frame drum, a Roman sistrum, a long-neck banjo, and some duduks from Armenia. (Duduks are the haunting reed instruments used in movie soundtracks to convey xeno-profundity.) There are many more instruments in other rooms of the house, and I’ve learned to play them all. I’ve become a compulsive explorer of new instruments and the ways they make me feel.

I keep a small oud in the kitchen, and sometimes, between e-mails, I improvise with it. Ouds resemble lutes, which in turn resemble guitars. But where a guitar has a flat back, an oud has a domelike form that presses backward against the belly or chest. This makes playing one a tender experience. You must find just the right way to hold it, constraining your shoulders, moving mainly the smaller muscles below the elbows. Holding an oud is a little like holding a baby. While cradling an infant, I feel pretensions drop away: here is the only future we truly have—a sacred moment. Playing the oud, I am exposed. The instrument is confessional to me.

But that’s not how all players experience their ouds. The most famous oud player of the twentieth century was probably the Syrian-Egyptian superstar Farid al-Atrash, who was both a respected classical musician of the highest order and a pop-culture figure and movie star. (Imagine a cross between Jascha Heifetz and Elvis Presley.) His playing was often crowd-pleasing, extroverted, and muscular. I have an oud similar to one Atrash played; it was created by a member of Syria’s multigenerational Nahat family, whose instruments are often described as the Stradivariuses of the oud world. In the nineteen-forties, my Nahat was savaged by a notorious Brooklyn dealer who tried to claim it as his own by covering the original label and marquetry. Later, an Armenian American luthier tried to remake it as an Armenian instrument, with disastrous results. After I bought the oud out of the attic of a player who had given up on it, two remarkable luthiers restored it, and the oud started to speak in a way that possessed me. Listeners notice—they ask, “What is that thing?”

Nahat ouds can be especially big. My arms have to travel more in order to move up and down the longer neck; the muscles around my shoulders become engaged, as they do when I’m playing the guitar. Moving this way, I become aware of the world beyond the small instrument I’m swaddling; I start to play more for others than for myself. The cello also makes me feel this way. You have to use your shoulders—your whole back—to play a cello. But cellos summon a different set of feelings. Playing one, you’re still bound up in a slightly awkward way, bent around a vibrating entity—not a baby, not a lover, but maybe a large dog.

The khaen, from Laos and northeastern Thailand, is the instrument I play the most in public. It’s a mouth organ—something like a giant harmonica, but with an earthy, ancient tone. Tall bamboo tubes jut both upward and downward from a teak vessel, angling into a spire which seems to emerge, unicorn-like, from the forehead of the performer. I first encountered one as a teen-ager, in the nineteen-seventies, during a time when I was exploring Chinese music clubs in San Francisco. These were frequented mainly by older people, and often situated in the basements of faded apartment buildings. The khaen isn’t Chinese, but I noticed one resting against a wall in a club and asked if I could try it. As soon as I picked up the khaen I became a rhythmic musician, driving a hard beat with double- and triple-tonguing patterns. The old men applauded when I finished. “Take it,” a woman holding an erhu said.

Later, I learned that my instant style was completely unrelated to what goes on in Laos. It emerged, I think, from how the khaen works with one’s breathing. On a harmonica, as on many instruments, the note changes when you switch between inhaling and exhaling—but on a khaen, one can breathe both in and out without changing pitch. Breathing is motion, and so the khaen and its cousins from Asia, such as the Chinese sheng, are liberating to play. I’ve been lucky enough to play khaen with many great musicians—with Jon Batiste and the Stay Human band on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” for instance, and with Ornette Coleman. When I played the khaen with George Clinton and P-Funk, Clinton stood facing me, leaning in until we were just inches apart; he widened his eyes to make the channel between our beings as high-bandwidth as possible, breathing ferociously to transmit the groove he was improvising. It was the most physically demanding performance of my life.

If playing the khaen turns me into an extroverted athlete, then the xiao—which is held vertically, like a clarinet or an oboe—invites me to explore internal dramas. This isn’t just a mind-set but a physical sensation: while playing xiao I feel a rolling movement in the air just behind my upper front teeth, and a second area of resonance in my chest, and I seem to move these reservoirs of air around as I use the instrument. I’m not the only one to have this kind of sensation: singers often say that they experience air in this way, and flute teachers I’ve known have talked about “blue” or “yellow” air flows. I’ve had long conversations with wind players about how we seem to be painting the flow of air inside our bodies. I have to suspend my skepticism when this sort of talk starts—I don’t think we’re really doing what we describe, but I do think we’re describing something real. It’s possible to shape tone by adjusting the mouth, tongue, lips, jaw, throat, and chest. When I find my tone, I even feel the presence of a structure in the air between my lips and the flute—a tumbling, ineffable caterpillar, rolling rapidly on its long axis. The caterpillar collaborates with me, sometimes helping, sometimes pushing back, and by interacting with it I can explore a world of tone.

Did the xiao players of the past perceive invisible caterpillars like mine? Maybe they did. Xiaos have come in many shapes and sizes over the centuries, but, judging by the illustrations that have been preserved, they’ve all been recognizably xiao. On the other hand, there are many ways to play a flute. Perhaps xiao notes used to end in elegant calligraphic rises; maybe the breath was emphasized so that the sound of the flute seemed continuous with nature; or possibly ancient xiao tones were lustrous and technical, with perfect stability. Perhaps the sound that xiao players sought was deceptively transparent but filled with little features, or maybe they were show-offs, playing high, fast, and loud. These descriptions fit contemporary flute-playing styles, and it seems possible that historical styles resembled them—or not.

In recent years, a heightened spirit of experimentation in xiao-building has developed. Most of the experiments have to do with the shape of the blowing edge—the place where one edge of a flute’s tube has been thinned, forming a tiny ridge that’s positioned against the bottom lip to receive the breath. At the blowing edge, the air alternately flows more to the inside or the outside of the flute. This oscillation radiates as sound. Flutists of all cultures are vulnerable to debilitating fascinations with the tiniest design choices in blowing edges and the nearby interiors of their flutes. In Taiwan, a small cult has arisen around the idea of combining an outside cut in the form of a letter “U,” which is typical of some schools of xiao design, with an inside form that’s more like a “V.” Debates about the new cut run rampant in online forums.

After reading some of them, I finally ordered a flute with the new cut. (That I could do this so effortlessly made me feel momentarily better about how the Internet has turned out so far.) When I played my “U”/“V” xiao for the first time, I made the futile blowing sound familiar to beginning flutists. Eventually, though, I managed a few weird, false notes. I was surprised but also delighted. Some of my favorite moments in musical life come when I can’t yet play an instrument. It’s in the fleeting period of playing without skill that you can hear sounds beyond imagination. Eventually, I cajoled the caterpillar and found a tone I love, solid yet translucent. When that happens, the challenge is remembering how to make those fascinating, false notes. One mustn’t lose one’s childhood.

I’m a computer scientist by profession, and I started travelling to Japan at the beginning of the nineteen-eighties, when I was developing the first virtual-reality headsets and searching for business partners and technical components. I was surprised to find few young people there interested in traditional Japanese music. Precious and playable antique instruments like the shakuhachi, a traditional bamboo flute, could be bought at flea markets for less than the price of breakfast—and they were being snapped up not by Japanese students but by young Westerners who worshipped the remaining teachers. Meanwhile, interest in European classical music, which was declining in the West, was growing in Japan. I met many Japanese musicians who found Mozart as appealing as the Beatles , and who played violin and piano along with rock and roll. In Western countries, the social institutions that kept classical music alive—conservatories, instrument builders, teachers, contests—were being sustained by an influx of stunning musicians from Asia. A kind of cultural trade was taking place.

My experiences studying music in Japan were often astonishing. I chased down a teacher who claimed to be the holder of an ancient Buddhist shakuhachi tradition that had been suppressed by the mainstream musical world; his lessons were fused with a tea ceremony. I met another teacher who would only accept a student who could walk into the forest and choose a stalk of bamboo that, when it was cut down, would turn out to be in tune as a flute. (He gave me only one chance to get it right, and I failed.) In one of the main shakuhachi “lodges” in Tokyo, I came across a culture of male-dominated locker-room talk, in which some styles of playing were approved as sufficiently macho while others were denigrated as “gay.” Much of what I encountered startled me—it didn’t reflect what I’d read in books back in America about the shakuhachi.

Music operates on a plane separate from literature, and a lot of information about it isn’t written down. Most of the world’s compositions were never notated, and what was written down is often minimal; although scores do exist for very old Chinese music—some of the oldest are for the noble guqin, a kind of zither—they amount to mnemonic devices, lists of strokes and playing positions. The earliest European scores are similar, with lists of notes. What we now call “early music” is largely a modern stylistic invention. I tend to learn the rudiments of my instruments and then develop my own style; I’m an eternal amateur. But I console myself by noting that there are very few musical conservatories structured enough to preserve musical styles over long periods of time. We can study how Bach’s music might have sounded, or how the shakuhachi was actually played, but we can never really know. What would it have sounded like to be at court in ancient Egypt, Persia, India, China, Greece, Mesopotamia? The truth has been lost to time.

The exquisite skills involved in making instruments can seem to hover just beyond the edge of scientific understanding, and can easily be lost when war, plague, and famine break the chains linking masters and apprentices. And yet the traditions of a lost musical culture can sometimes be revived. Modern instrument makers can copy preserved examples of old instruments, or even work from illustrations. In the case of the xiao, much was lost through the centuries, and then again in the Cultural Revolution —but xiaos are small and easy to hide. Some musicians are said to have buried them in secret locations, in hopes of escaping Mao Zedong ’s attempts to engineer culture from scratch. This complex history means that, today, there are contrasting contemporary approaches to playing the xiao. Some players see learning and performing with the instrument as a spiritual quest to reconnect with the past; others play what sounds to me like a Hollywood composer’s idea of Chinese music from the early twentieth century—a musical genre that’s aged surprisingly well. There’s no verifiably authentic way to play such an ancient instrument.

As a technologist, my work has often focussed on the creation of interactive devices, such as head-mounted displays and haptic gloves. It’s sobering for me to compare the instruments I’ve played with the devices that Silicon Valley has made. I’ve never had an experience with any digital device that comes at all close to those I’ve had with even mediocre acoustic musical instruments. What’s the use of ushering in a new era dominated by digital technology if the objects that that era creates are inferior to pre-digital ones?

For decades, researchers have been attempting to model acoustic instruments with software. Simulated saxophones and violins can sound impressive but only within an artificially constrained frame. Listen to one note at a time and the synthetic instruments sound good. Connect the notes together and the illusion fails. This may be because the experience of interacting creatively with such models is sterile, vacant, and ridiculous. One is usually clicking on little dots on a screen, or pushing buttons, or—in the very best case—adjusting variables with physical knobs and sliders. From a commercial point of view, this doesn’t make simulated instruments useless; embedded in the mix, splashed with reverb and other effects, they sound just fine. But physical instruments channel the unrepeatable process of interaction, a quality lost with modern production technology.

Human senses have evolved to the point that we can occasionally react to the universe down to the quantum limit; our retinas can register single photons, and our ability to sense something teased between fingertips is profound. But that is not what makes instruments different from digital-music models. It isn’t a contest about numbers. The deeper difference is that computer models are made of abstractions—letters, pixels, files—while acoustic instruments are made of material. The wood in an oud or a violin reflects an old forest, the bodies who played it, and many other things, but in an intrinsic, organic way, transcending abstractions. Physicality got a bad rap in the past. It used to be that the physical was contrasted with the spiritual. But now that we have information technologies, we can see that materiality is mystical. A digital object can be described, while an acoustic one always remains a step beyond us.

Today, tech companies promise to create algorithms that can analyze old music to create new music. But music is ambiguous: is it mostly a product to be produced and enjoyed, or is the creation of it the most important thing? If it’s the former, then being able to automate the production of music is at least a coherent idea, whether or not it is a good one. But, if it’s the latter, then pulling music creation away from people undermines the whole point. I often work with students who want to build algorithms that make music. I ask them, Do you mean you want to design algorithms that are like instruments, and which people can use to make new music, or do you just want an A.I. to make music for you? For those students who want to have optimal music made for them, I have to ask, Would you want robots to have sex for you so you don’t have to? I mean, what is life for?

Much of the music we enjoy today makes use of audio loops, by means of which a note can be repeated with absolute precision. Because of my work with computers, I had early access to looping tools, and I was able to play around with loops earlier than most musicians. At first, the techniques didn’t speak to me; music is about change, I thought, while loops are about artificially preventing change. When so-called minimalist composers— Philip Glass , Terry Riley—ask musicians to play the same phrases repeatedly, what emerges from this technique isn’t repetition but an exquisite awareness of change: using a traditional, physical instrument, each repetition reflects your breath, your pulse, the weather, the audience, the light, bringing subtlety into consciousness. My understanding of loops shifted when hip-hop appeared. Here was a genre that was often angry, often a protest—the use of loops could evoke the strictures a rapper raged against. Some musicians now make their loops a little blurry, as if to suggest impermanence. For many people, of course, loops have become so commonplace that it’s hard to perceive them as a contrast to anything else.

In my own musical life, I prize the edge of chaos; that which cannot be repeated. I usually don’t record myself when I play alone; I don’t want to trick myself into a false mentality that lives outside of time, as if we weren’t time’s prisoners. I want to send music out into the universe, not into a computer’s memory. As crazy as it is to learn to play a multitude of instruments, my madness is the opposite of the loop. I’m often asked if I’ve learned all these instruments in order to make a sample library, or if I’d be willing to have someone come to the house to make such a library. Though I offer positivity from afar to musicians who like samples, I am travelling in a different direction.

If you work with virtual reality, you end up wondering what reality is in the first place. Over the years, I’ve toyed with one possible definition of reality: it’s the thing that can’t be perfectly simulated, because it can’t be measured to completion. Digital information can be perfectly measured, because that is its very definition. This makes it unreal. But reality is irrepressible.

I sometimes dwell on these ideas when I play the piano. A piano is essentially a row of keys, plus some pedals. Once a key has been depressed, a mechanism sends a felt hammer flying toward a string, which is not in direct contact with the key. In theory, this means that a piano played without the damping pedal ought to be abstract, like an electronic keyboard. The only information the hammer seems to convey from a key to a string is a single number—velocity. That’s also how much information a key press communicates in an electronic keyboard. And yet the experience of playing an acoustic piano, and of listening to one, is that more is being conveyed. When pianists trade off on the same instrument, they perform with individual touches and sounds. Pianos are somewhat abstract devices that have transcended abstraction.

My fondest hope for computing is that digital devices will become as much like pianos as possible. But the subtlest qualities of analog instruments are hard to study, in part because the controls necessary to make studies rigorous risk obscuring important elements of musical experience. There have been many studies comparing old and new violins, for instance, or flutes made of different metals, in which a player is hidden behind a screen and listeners are asked to identify which instrument is being played. The problem with this approach is that the difference between a good instrument and a great one could inhere in the player’s experience, rather than in the external sound. If an instrument inspires a musician, then the music will be more meaningful, even if listeners can’t distinguish the sound of one instrument from another. Music is an interior art before it becomes exterior.

For me, the piano has an interior aspect. The piano is one of the few instruments that’s bigger than you. Playing it, you are the baby: strike as much as you like, it remains the same. After my mother died, I became obsessed with fast arpeggios, and I zoomed between the extremes of the keyboard; I was also drawn toward the American-Mexican composer Conlon Nancarrow, who wrote superhuman piano music for player pianos, using hand-punched player-piano rolls. When I was a teen-ager, I often hitchhiked from New Mexico to visit him in Mexico City. I was determined to play as fast as the pianos automated by Conlon; his machines, in their unreality, were a flight from human frailty and trauma. I emulated them by challenging them in my own piano playing. In my fury, the piano became a chunk of reality to obliterate, though quixotically. You can caress a piano or attack it, be loud or soft, become proficient or not, make as much beauty as you can or flail in chaos—the instrument will most likely endure beyond you.

Decades have passed since that time. Today, I love to have musicians over to my house, where we can combine different instruments to see what happens. The joy that transpires when things go well is multilayered. There is the pleasure of connection with other people, and there is also the happiness of finding a new little corner of aesthetic interiority together. Music can conjure a new flow, a new pattern, a new flavor, between and inside people. And playing sufficiently obscure instruments forces a different approach to music. How can you be competitive about raw skill, or get into some other macho trap, when the task at hand is so esoteric? Who is to judge the winner in a contest that must invent itself over and over? When music made collaboratively with other musicians goes right, I feel a budding, rising warmth and comfort. Is this my mother smiling on me? Or maybe it’s me, smiling on her. ♦

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Children playing musical instruments.

What are the principal types of musical instruments?

The principal types of musical instruments are percussion, stringed, keyboard, wind, and electronic.

Archaeology has revealed musical instruments such as pipes and whistles in the Paleolithic Period and clay drums and shell trumpets in the Neolithic Period. Ancient cultures of Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean, India, East Asia, and the Americas all possessed diverse and well-developed assortments of musical instruments, indicating that a long previous development must have existed.

musical instrument , any device for producing a musical sound . The principal types of such instruments, classified by the method of producing sound, are percussion , stringed , keyboard , wind , and electronic .

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Musical instruments are almost universal components of human culture: archaeology has revealed pipes and whistles in the Paleolithic Period and clay drums and shell trumpets in the Neolithic Period . It has been firmly established that the ancient city cultures of Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean, India , East Asia , and the Americas all possessed diverse and well-developed assortments of musical instruments, indicating that a long previous development must have existed. As to the origin of musical instruments, however, there can be only conjecture. Some scholars have speculated that the first instruments were derived from such utilitarian objects as cooking pots (drums) and hunting bows (musical bows); others have argued that instruments of music might well have preceded pots and bows; while in the myths of cultures throughout the world the origin of music has frequently been attributed to the gods, especially in areas where music seems to have been regarded as an essential component of the ritual believed necessary for spiritual survival.

Whatever their origin, the further development of the enormously varied instruments of the world has been dependent on the interplay of four factors: available material, technological skills, mythic and symbolic preoccupations, and patterns of trade and migration. Thus, residents of Arctic regions use bone, skin, and stone to construct instruments; residents of the tropics have wood, bamboo, and reed available; while societies with access to metals and the requisite technology are able to utilize these malleable materials in a variety of ways. Myth and symbolism play an equally important role. Herding societies, for example, which may depend on a particular species of animal not only economically but also spiritually, often develop instruments that look or sound like the animal or prefer instruments made of bone and hide rather than stone and wood, even when all the materials are available. Finally, patterns of human trade and migration have for many centuries swept musicians and their instruments across seas and continents, resulting in constant flux, change, and cross-fertilization and adaptation .

The sound produced by an instrument can be affected by many factors, including the material from which the instrument is made, its size and shape, and the way that it is played. For example, a stringed instrument may be struck, plucked, or bowed, each method producing a distinctive sound. A wooden instrument struck by a beater sounds markedly different from a metal instrument, even if the two instruments are otherwise identical. On the other hand, a flute made of metal does not produce a substantially different sound from one made of wood, for in this case the vibrations are in the column of air in the instrument. The characteristic timbre of wind instruments depends on other factors, notably the length and shape of the tube. The length of the tube not only determines the pitch but also affects the timbre: the piccolo , being half the size of the flute, has a shriller sound. The shape of the tube determines the presence or absence of the “upper partials” (harmonic or nonharmonic overtones ), which give colour to the single note. (For more on the science of sound, see acoustics .)

Young girl wearing a demin jacket playing the trumpet (child, musical instruments, Asian ethnicity)

This article discusses the evolution of musical instruments, their structure and methods of sound production , and the purposes for which they have been used. Although it focuses on the families of instruments that have been prominent in Western art music, it also includes coverage of non-Western and folk instruments.

Musical instruments have been used since earliest times for a variety of purposes, ranging from the entertainment of concert audiences to the accompaniment of dances, rituals , work, and medicine. The use of instruments for religious ceremonies has continued down to the present day, though at various times they have been suspect because of their secular associations. The many references to instruments in the Old Testament are evidence of the fact that they played an important part in Jewish worship until for doctrinal reasons they were excluded. It is also clear that the early Christians in the eastern Mediterranean used instruments in their services, since the practice was severely condemned by ecclesiastics, who insisted that the references to instruments in the Psalms were to be interpreted symbolically. Although instruments continue to be banned in Islamic mosques (but not in religious processions or Sufi ritual) and in the traditional Eastern Orthodox church, they play important roles in the ritual of most other societies. For example, Buddhist cultures are rich in instruments, particularly bells and drums (and in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China, wind instruments as well).

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Belief in the magical properties of instruments is found in many societies. The Jewish shofar (a ram’s horn), which is still blown on Rosh Hashana (New Year) and Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement), must be heard by the congregation. The power of the shofar is illustrated by the story of Joshua at the siege of Jericho: when the priests blew their shofars seven times, the walls of the city fell flat. In India, according to legend , when the deity Krishna played the flute, the rivers stopped flowing and the birds came down to listen. The birds are said to have done the same in 14th-century Italy when the composer Francesco Landini played his organetto , or portative organ . In China, instruments were identified with the points of the compass, with the seasons, and with natural phenomena. The Melanesian bamboo flute was a charm for rebirth.

Many of the instruments used in medieval Europe came from western Asia, and they have retained some of their original symbolism. For example, trumpets , long associated with military operations, had a ceremonial function in the establishment of European kings and nobles and were, in fact, regarded as a sign of nobility. In the later Middle Ages and for long afterward, they were associated with kettledrums (known originally as naker s, after their Arab name, naqqārah ), which were often played on horseback, as they still are in some mounted regiments. Trumpet fanfares, heard on ceremonial occasions in the modern world, are a survival of medieval practice.

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IELTS WRITING: MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Ielts writing task 2:, some experts think that all students should learn musical instruments. to what extent do you agree or disagree.

SAMPLE ESSAY

It is believed by some professionals that every student should learn how to play musical instruments. In my opinion, I disagree that all students should be required to learn musical instruments as it would be problematic, I believe students should be given the freedom to choose a subject that would interest them.    

Requiring all students to learn how to play any musical instrument in schools would be disadvantageous to those students whose interest is not in music. Those students who are forced to learn about it, despite not being interested in it, would only waste their teacher’s time and their time since they do not have any desire to learn it. Thus (as a result) , they both become unproductive (not effective in bringing something about) .     

In addition, when they are forced to study about playing any musical instrument along (at the same time as; together with) with their classmates who can easily execute it, they would only feel inferior (of little importance or value) . They would think that they are not talented or are not capable of achieving things, or worse, they would think that they are witless (stupid) . This, then, makes them lose the motivation to learn.    

I think the best thing that experts or people in the academe (a place of instruction) should do is to assess the interests of students and guide them in choosing the type of subject or activity that can help them develop their skills better. Moreover, by giving them the freedom to choose the type of subject to study, learning would become easy and natural.  

In conclusion, experts must not make all students learn how to play musical instruments if students are simply not interested in it, instead, they should allow students to exercise their right to focus on learning a subject or an activity that would help them utilize or develop their skills fully.    

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Essay 390 – Every child should be taught how to play a musical instrument

Gt writing task 2 / essay sample # 390.

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

Write about the following topic:

Some educators believe that every child should be taught how to play a musical instrument.

To what extent do you agree or disagree?

Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience.

Write at least 250 words.

Model Answer:

While there are certainly benefits to learning to play a musical instrument for young children, I believe that the decision to pursue musical education should be based on individual interests and aptitude. So, the notion that every child should be taught how to play a musical instrument is a perspective that I disagree with. This essay will present arguments against the idea of mandatory musical instrument education for all children.

Firstly, it is crucial to acknowledge that children possess unique talents, interests, and aptitudes. Forcing every child to learn a musical instrument may neglect their individual passions and strengths in other areas. Education should encourage and support a wide range of talents, including sports, visual arts, sciences, and humanities. By providing diverse educational opportunities, children can discover and develop their individual interests and talents, fostering a more well-rounded and inclusive learning environment. For instance, when a child shows interest and talent in sports, forcing him or her to learn to play a musical instrument is counterproductive.

Secondly, mandatory musical instrument education may create undue pressure and stress for some children. Not all children may have the inclination or desire to pursue music, and imposing such education on them may lead to feelings of frustration and disengagement. Education should prioritize the holistic development of children, considering their mental well-being and emotional needs. It is essential to create an educational environment that values personal growth and allows children to explore various disciplines according to their own preferences.

In conclusion, while there are merits to musical instrument education, I disagree with the idea of mandatory music education for every child. Education should be inclusive, allowing children to explore various disciplines and nurturing their unique talents and passions. By embracing a flexible and well-rounded approach, we can provide children with a comprehensive education that supports their holistic development and prepares them for a diverse and ever-changing world.

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My Favorite Musical Instrument: The Guitar Essay

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Introduction

Construction.

When one mentions the words musical instrument, then what comes in any person’s mind is sound. Sound may be defined as the mechanical vibrations which are transmitted by an elastic medium or the part of a transmitted signal which is audible. Guitar is one of these instruments and it has been there for along time. We have various types of guitars having different sounds. The most common are the classical, or nylon string, and the folk which has steel string. Each produces a unique sound depending on the materials from which the strings are made and their bodies’ composition, as well as the air between them.

A guitar has six strings tied taught and are placed over a hollow large body to resonate the sounds. The strings have open notes of E 2 , A 2 , D 3 , G 3 , B 3 , and E 4 , with the corresponding frequencies of 82 Hz, 110 Hz, 147 Hz, 196 Hz, 247 Hz, 330 Hz respectively (Zachary, 1991). The frequencies listed are a representation of the root tone of each string. A guitar sounds as it does because of the overlay of various frequencies on individual string, or the overtones which are present. These overtones’ pattern and their strengths make a guitar produce different sound from other stringed instruments. The guitar also has a top plate which is usually made of spruce or a light, springy wood, about 2.5 mm thick. Inside the plate we have a series of braces which strengthen the plate and affect the vibrations of the top plate. The back plate is of much less importance musically for most frequencies. This is because it is normally held against the player’s body.

When the strings are plucked, they produce mechanical vibrations which give sound that is transferred into the guitar’s body. The vibrations produced by a guitar are known as standing waves since the strings are fixed at both ends. These waves do satisfy the relationship that exists between wavelength and frequency that originates from definition of waves where v is the wave’s velocity, f is its frequency and lambda is the wavelength (Arthur, 1990). Due to these vibrations, internal resonance is setup in the air chamber which is made by the body and causes the face plate and back plate to vibrate. These vibrations produce compressions and rarefactions which are high pressure zones and low-pressure zones respectively. Our ear interprets compression waves in the air as sound. At any given point in the air, which is near the source of sound, the molecules move backward and forward resulting in the air pressure varying up and down by small amounts.

The principal role of the body is to transmit the bridge’s vibration into the vibration of the air which is around it. Thus, it needs a large surface area to enable it push reasonable amount of air backward and forward. The top plate is made in a manner to allow it to vibrate up and down comparatively easily. The air inside the body is very important for the low range on the instrument. It can vibrate like the air in a bottle when blown across the top. When you sing a note lying between F#2 and A2 (depending on the type of guitar) while you are placing your ear near the sound hole, you will hear the air in the body resonating. This is referred to as the Helmholtz resonance and is as result of the air at the sound hole oscillating, enabled by the springiness nature of the air found inside the body. The effect of this resonance may also be experienced by one playing the A string open and as it is sounds, a piece of cardboard is moved back and forth across the sound hole. It is observed that the resonance stops or shifts to a lower frequency. When you close up the hole, you will notice the loss of bass response in the sound given out. The air inside is coupled to the lowest resonance of the top plate effectively. As a unit they do give a strong resonance at approximately an octave higher than the main air resonance. To some extent the air also couples the movement of the top and back plates. For an electric guitar, pick-ups which employ the principle of magnetic induction in relaying sound are used. The pick-ups are made of small electromagnets which do allow electric current to flow through them. They are situated closely to the strings hence induce north and south poles on the strings. They do convert motion energy into electrical energy. Plucking a string makes it oscillate or move in a wave-line manner which does affect the surrounding o f the pick-up thus causing a change in magnetic field (Neville & Thomas, 1998). These fluctuations in the magnetic field are relayed through the wires which are connecting the pick-up to the output jack. This is then transmitted to the amplifier which then sends them to the speaker which converts from electrical energy to sound energy (George, 1990).

In conclusion, musical instruments do have different constructions and designs. However, they share one thing in common which is to produce organized sound pleasant to the ear. Most sources of sound produce different frequencies or several notes at the same time. For a good musical instrument, these notes are mixed at an organized pattern to produce music, and this is clearly experienced in a guitar which is my favorite instrument.

Arthur, H. B. (1990). Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics. New York: Dover Publications.

George, B. (1990). Making Stringed Instruments: A workshop Guide. New York: Sterling Publications.

Neville, H. F., Thomas, D. R. (1998). The Physics of Musical Instruments . New York: Springer Verlag.

Zachary, T. R. (1991). Making Early Stringed Instruments. New York: Bold Strummer.

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IvyPanda. (2022, April 25). My Favorite Musical Instrument: The Guitar. https://ivypanda.com/essays/my-favorite-musical-instrument-the-guitar/

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IELTS Speaking: Musical Instruments Questions and Answers

It is possible to be asked about musical instruments in all parts of the IELTS speaking test. Below are some questions which mostly appear in part 1 but questions 4 to 5 can appear in part 1 and part 3. Two model answers are given below as well. This is topic currently being used in 2017.

You can vocabulary for types of musical instruments here: Musical Instruments Word List

Questions: IELTS Speaking Musical Instruments Topics

Check some possible questions for this topic:

  • Did you ever learn a musical instrument as a child?
  • If you could learn a musical instrument, what would you choose?
  • If you had a child, what musical instrument would you encourage him/her to play?
  • What traditional instruments are there in your country?
  • Do you think traditional musical instruments have a place in modern society?
  • How do you think traditional music could be made more popular?

Sample Answers for Part 1

Q. Did you ever learn a musical instrument as a child?

A. No, I didn’t but I always wish I had. If I had had the chance, I would have learned the guitar. The problem was that my parents thought it was more important to focus on school work than learn to play an instrument.

Q. If you could learn to play any musical instrument, what would you choose?

A. I think I’d probably go for the violin. It’s such a beautiful stringed instrument and I think the music that can be played on it, can be really haunting and moving. Yes, I’d definitely choose that one.

Sample Answer for Part 3

Do you think traditional instruments have a place in modern society?

Absolutely yes. Traditional instruments are part of our heritage and our identity. I believe that all school children should have the opportunity to learn to play one of them a part of their music lessons. For example, the tabla, which is like a pair of wooden hand drums, is a traditional instrument in our country and is part of most traditional songs. So, learning it would enable children to appreciate their country’s musical history more.

Recommended for IELTS Speaking:

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Hello Liz, How are you doing? Could you guide me? Since this Covid pandemic, my IELTS preparation classes have been discontinued. So I refer to online sites like yours for my preparation. My exam was scheduled on 10th August after constant postponement. It was sudden and I was not confident with my speaking part. During my speaking test, I performed badly in part 2. I was not able to talk for 2 minutes. I stuttered and talked gibberish. I got nervous. Fortunately part 1 and 3 was good for me. The LRW modules were great as I did well. But I am afraid I might score less than 6.5 in speaking. What do you think?

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Cue Card Sample

Ielts cue card # 229 - a musical instrument you would like to be able to play, describe a musical instrument you would like to be able to play..

  • what type of musical instrument it is
  • what it sounds and looks like
  • what kinds of people/musicians it is popular with

Similar Cue Card Topics

  • Describe a skill you have. 
  • Describe a musical instrument you can play. 
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Everyone should learn to play a musical instrument.’ Do you agree or disagree?

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IELTS essay Everyone should learn to play a musical instrument. ’

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Musical Instruments Essay Examples

Musical Instruments - Free Essay Examples and Topic Ideas

Musical instruments are tools used to create sound and music. They come in a variety of forms, such as strings, percussion, brass, and woodwind. Their construction and use vary greatly across cultures and time periods. Some instruments are played by striking, plucking, or bowing strings, while others are blown, tapped, or shaken to produce sound. Musicians use these instruments to give expression to melody, harmony, and rhythm, creating the emotional effects of music that connect with listeners.

  • 📘 Free essay examples for your ideas about Musical Instruments
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children should learn to play musical instruments. do you agree or disagree

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Support ideas with relevant, specific examples

Examples make your writing easier to understand by illustrating points more effectively.

Examples, if used properly, not only help you get higher marks for ‘Task Response’ but also for ‘Coherence’.

When giving examples it is best to put them after your main idea or topic sentence. They can be used in the middle of supporting sentences or they can be used to start a new sentence. There is no rule for where exactly to give examples in essays, logically they would come after your main idea/topic sentence or just after a supporting sentence.

Linking words for giving examples:

  • for example
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chart the amount of tea and coffee imported by four different countries in 2017.

You experienced an incident on public transport that caused you distress. write a letter to the manager of the public transport company. in your letter: describe the incident;explain how this incident affected you and suggest what could be done about it, car ownership has increased so rapidly over the past thity years that many cities in the world are now 'one big traffic jam'. how true do you think this statement is what measures can governments take to discourage people from using their cars, the greatest advantage of the railway transport is that it is the most dependable mode of transport as it is the least affected by weather conditions such as rains, fog etc. compared to other modes of transports. what are the advantages and disadvantages, in some countries, more and more people are becoming interested in finding out about the history of the house or building they live in. what are the reasons for this how can people research this.

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  3. My Favorite Musical Instrument: The Guitar

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COMMENTS

  1. Essay on Musical Instruments

    Musical instruments are tools that people use to make music. Just like a painter uses a brush to paint pictures, musicians use instruments to create sounds. There are many kinds of musical instruments, and each one can make different noises. Some are played by hitting them, like drums. Others are played by blowing air through them, like flutes.

  2. IELTS Essay: Musical Instruments

    Analysis. 1. Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an indispensable part of a student's education. 2. In my opinion, there are socioeconomic concerns with this tenet but it is still advisable overall. Paraphrase the overall essay topic. Write a clear opinion. Read more about introductions here.

  3. Argumentative Essay Example: All Students Should Learn a Musical Instrument

    First, all students should learn a musical instrument because it builds character. Learning anything in life has its ups and downs, but once mastered the reward of satisfaction far outways the beginning struggles. "Hard Work" is a valued lesson for any student to learn for life. According to "The Hidden Benefits" (1985,6), in American ...

  4. What My Musical Instruments Have Taught Me

    July 22, 2023. Photograph by Michael Turek. It started after my mother died. She was a concentration-camp survivor—a prodigy concert pianist in Vienna who was taken when she was only a girl. She ...

  5. Musical instrument

    Musical instrument, any device for producing musical sound. The principal types of such instruments, classified by the method of producing sound, are percussion, stringed, keyboard, wind, and electronic. Learn more about the characteristics and classification of musical instruments in this article.

  6. IELTS WRITING: MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

    SAMPLE ESSAY . It is believed by some professionals that every student should learn how to play musical instruments. In my opinion, I disagree that all students should be required to learn musical instruments as it would be problematic, I believe students should be given the freedom to choose a subject that would interest them.

  7. Choosing a musical instrument

    Think about where and when you are going to practise, as well as the patience of the people you live with or near. Electric versions of instruments like the piano, drums, guitar and even violin give you the option of playing into the night using headphones, while your housemates sleep in peace. Alternatively, you may need to consider going to a ...

  8. Essay 390

    This essay will present arguments against the idea of mandatory musical instrument education for all children. Firstly, it is crucial to acknowledge that children possess unique talents, interests, and aptitudes. Forcing every child to learn a musical instrument may neglect their individual passions and strengths in other areas.

  9. IELTS Writing Task 2: Musical Instruments

    Many teachers feel that learning to play a musical instrument is an indispensable part of a student's education. In my opinion, there are socioeconomic concerns with this tenet but it is still advisable overall. Detractors can easily argue not every child has access to the supportive environment required to learn an instrument.

  10. Some experts think that all students should learn musical instruments

    Writing Samples /. Band 7. Some experts think that all students should learn musical instruments. To what extent do you agree or disagree. # experts # students # instruments. Nowadays, some professional scholars believe that all pupils need to learn musical instruments. In my opinion, I partly agree because there are some benefits to learning.

  11. Talk about a musical instrument you would like to be able to play

    Model Answer 1: I love music and prefer the heavy metal genre. Thereby, I am accustomed to the electric guitar and would like to be able to play it someday. There is a wide range of guitars are available and the history of guitar dates back to the 12th century. It was introduced as a musical instrument in Europe, then.

  12. My Favorite Musical Instrument: The Guitar Essay

    A guitar has six strings tied taught and are placed over a hollow large body to resonate the sounds. The strings have open notes of E 2, A 2, D 3, G 3, B 3, and E 4, with the corresponding frequencies of 82 Hz, 110 Hz, 147 Hz, 196 Hz, 247 Hz, 330 Hz respectively (Zachary, 1991). The frequencies listed are a representation of the root tone of ...

  13. Full essay: Learning a musical instrument

    Some educationalists say that every child should be taught how to play a musical instrument. To what extent do you agree or disagree? Home; Index. Advice; Reading; Listening; Speaking; Writing Task 1 (Ac) Writing Task 1 (Gen) Writing Task 2; Grammar; Vocabulary; Teacher Training; Ebooks; Videos

  14. IELTS Speaking: Musical Instruments Questions and Answers

    Sample Answers for Part 1. Q. Did you ever learn a musical instrument as a child? A. No, I didn't but I always wish I had. If I had had the chance, I would have learned the guitar. The problem was that my parents thought it was more important to focus on school work than learn to play an instrument. Q.

  15. Essay On Musical Instruments

    Essay On Musical Instruments. 1042 Words5 Pages. Metal stringed musical instruments have been used since the medieval ages until now. Since then different types of instruments have been made and perfected by humans. Some of these stringed instruments are known as the cello, violin, banjo, harp, piano, bass guitar and the common guitar.

  16. IELTS Cue Card # 229

    Model Answer 1: I have always believed that learning to play a musical instrument, whether we are young or old, gives us a great feeling as well as a great sense of accomplishment. But, unfortunately, I am yet to learn to play at least one musical instrument. But, on the other hand, if there is one musical instrument that I really want to be ...

  17. Essay on Musical Instruments

    Essay on Musical Instruments. A fairly old instrument that is still in use today is the theremin. It has a particular design that is different from any other instrument around and is played much more differently then other instruments in circulation today. The theremin is an electronic musical instrument that is played using electrical fields.

  18. IELTS essay Everyone should learn to play a musical instrument.' Do you

    Listening to and enjoying music is a very good exercise, music makes everyone perfect. When a person listens to music, only good thoughts awaken in his mind, and his mood rises and he becomes good and friendly with others. This leads to the formation of a sense of friendship, respect, attention, love between people. issues of the time.

  19. Some experts think that all students should learn musical instruments

    The importance of learning musical instruments for the students which was always debatable has now become more controversial with many people claiming that it is beneficial while others reject this notion.The substantial influence of this trend has sparked controversy over its potential impact in recent years | Band: 5 ... Your essay addresses ...

  20. Musical Instruments

    Musical instruments are tools used to create sound and music. They come in a variety of forms, such as strings, percussion, brass, and woodwind. Their construction and use vary greatly across cultures and time periods. Some instruments are played by striking, plucking, or bowing strings, while others are blown, tapped, or shaken to produce ...

  21. All children should learn to play a musical instrument at school

    this. view, and I do believe that children should have their own autonomy to make their own choices. On the one hand, schoolers can benefit a lot from attending musical classes. To begin. with, learning how to play. instruments. would cultivate their sense of art and foster their creativity compared with those. people.

  22. children should learn to play musical instruments

    children should learn to play musical instruments. do you agree or disagree. I disagree with. , there are more important subjects to learn that can be of more benefit to them. , The need for learning musical instruments or singing is considered of less priority compared with other skills.

  23. children should learn to play musical instruments

    involves soothing the mind and relaxation of the brain by reducing stress. Therefore. , it promotes gaining more academic success. For example. , some research shows that children who learn to play musical. instruments. have more problem-solving. skills. in their later life rather than the.