Movie Reviews

Tv/streaming, great movies, chaz's journal, contributors, black writers week.

plan 75 movie reviews

Now streaming on:

Japan is the world’s most rapidly aging society, and a culture where being a burden on others is considered—sometimes literally—a fate worse than death. It’s also a culture where personal suffering is hidden behind a cheerful facade. All of these elements come together in “Plan 75,” a thoughtful and gently dystopian feature debut from writer/director Chie Hayakawa . 

Around the same time as the shooting and completion of “Plan 75,” a Japanese intellectual named Yusuke Narita rocketed to infamy by arguing that mass suicide for Japan’s elderly was necessary to move the country forward. This isn’t far off from the world of Hayakawa’s film, which is indistinguishable from ours save for the existence of a government program called “Plan 75” that offers free euthanasia services to all Japanese citizens 75 and older. The plan is voluntary, and applicants are free to withdraw at any time—except they really aren’t. 

This is the case for Michi ( Chieko Baisho ), an elderly woman who is let go from her job at a hotel at the beginning of the film. Customers have been complaining that it makes them sad to see elderly people still working, management explains. That’s all well and good, except that Michi has no family and too much dignity to accept welfare payments. She wants to work, but no one will hire her, and landlords won’t rent apartments to unemployed tenants. What is left for her but to die? 

“Plan 75” follows Michi and her group of friends, who discuss the luxury amenities at a Plan 75 facility with the excitement of an impending resort vacation. Much of the film’s discomfort comes from the contrast between the program’s chipper face and its bleak reality: Bureaucrats sell customized death packages with the same tone as peddling insurance, and the logo for the mass euthanasia plan turns the “P” and the “A” into eyes in a cartoon smiley face. 

As Michi moves through the Plan 75 system, her storyline interacts with those of Plan 75 employees, each facing a unique moral dilemma related to their work. Hiromu ( Hayato Isomura ) is a Plan 75 bureaucrat whose apathy is challenged when his uncle Yukio ( Taka Takao ) applies for the program. Maria ( Stefanie Arianne ) is a Filipino immigrant who takes on the taboo job of undressing the corpses and preparing them for cremation in order to pay for her daughter’s heart surgery. 

These character arcs play out in subtle, naturalistic ways, with restrained performances that underline the tension between the film’s polite surface and unsettling subtext. (Baisho is particularly good as the conflicted Michi, whose desperation and resignation are reflected in her eyes.) The tone is too delicate to fully swing into horror, although Hayakawa and composer Rémi Boubal use nerve-shredding minor-key strings in the score. A violent hate crime in the opening scene takes place off camera, and the film’s most horrific revelation—that Plan 75 is selling “clients’” ashes to a recycling company for profit—unfolds in silence. Instead, Hayakawa allows the political implications to speak for themselves, which means that fully digesting the film’s provocative message depends on at least some cursory context. 

One of the things “Plan 75” asks its viewers is, “What makes a life worth living?” It's a question answered in poignant scenes of Michi washing her last dish and enjoying a misty predawn morning on the balcony of her high-rise apartment. If anything, the note it lands on here is a bit anodyne. But apparently, people do need to hear it: A newscast towards the end of the movie announces that Plan 75 is a success—so much so that the government is considering lowering the qualifying age to 65. 

Now playing in select theaters. 

Katie Rife

Katie Rife is a freelance writer and critic based in Chicago with a speciality in genre cinema. She worked as the News Editor of  The A.V. Club  from 2014-2019, and as Senior Editor of that site from 2019-2022. She currently writes about film for outlets like  Vulture, Rolling Stone, Indiewire, Polygon , and  RogerEbert.com.

Now playing

plan 75 movie reviews

What Remains

Craig d. lindsey.

plan 75 movie reviews

Slave Play. Not a Movie. A Play.

Brandon towns.

plan 75 movie reviews

Kaiya Shunyata

plan 75 movie reviews

Last Summer

Christy lemire.

plan 75 movie reviews

Sheila O'Malley

plan 75 movie reviews

Robot Dreams

Brian tallerico, film credits.

Plan 75 movie poster

Plan 75 (2023)

112 minutes

Chieko Baisho as Michi Tsunotani

Hayato Isomura as Hiromu Okabe

Stefanie Arianne as Maria

Yumi Kawai as Haruko Narimiya

Taka Takao as Yukio Okabe

Hisako Ôkata as Ineko Maki

Kazuyoshi Kushida as Kamatari Fujimaru

  • Chie Hayakawa

Cinematographer

  • Hideho Urata

Latest blog posts

plan 75 movie reviews

High Noon: Greg Kwedar and Monique Walton On Sing Sing

plan 75 movie reviews

Netflix’s "Receiver" Should Work for NFL Fans Despite a Predictable Playbook

plan 75 movie reviews

Hulu's “UnPrisoned” Takes Bigger Swings In Its Self-Assured Second Season

plan 75 movie reviews

Anchorman Wouldn’t Have Been Nearly as Great Without Christina Applegate

Advertisement

Supported by

‘Plan 75’ Review: Leaving Early

In this quietly bold debut feature, the Japanese government offers a euthanasia program and a 78-year-old woman considers her future.

  • Share full article

A woman with graying hair and a blue sweater stares across a room.

By Nicolas Rapold

In the lurid 1973 dystopian thriller “Soylent Green,” Edward G. Robinson movingly played a man who embraced euthanasia, dying in a special chamber while being soothed by classical music. That story was set in 2022. “Plan 75,” the quietly bold debut feature of Chie Hayakawa, is on the same page, envisioning a more or less present-day version of Japan that hawks euthanasia services to the aged.

As macabre as that sounds, the conceit channels actual anxieties in Japan about providing for a growing population of seniors. The sober drama centers on a 78-year-old woman, Michi (Chieko Baisho), who still has her independence, her health and a karaoke-loving friend circle.

The government’s assisted suicide program seems like an over-advertised nuisance to Michi, until she loses her job and finds a friend slumped over dead. Life turns precarious, Michi grows isolated and Plan 75 — the name of the government program — starts to sounds appealing. We are also introduced to a Plan 75 clerk, Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), and a Filipino caretaker, Maria (Stefanie Arianne), who takes an unsavory gig with the program.

Hayakawa avoids slipping into satire or a stylized dystopia, making details like a euthanasia spa package seem plausible (and insidious). Yet a somnolence hangs over the film, and Hiromu and Maria are left somewhere between having full-fledged story lines and just being useful foils. Still, Baisho gets across the creeping despair that morbidity and the loss of community can create — a sensation that lets “Plan 75” double as a consummate entry in pandemic-era cinema.

Plan 75 Not rated. In Japanese and Tagalog, with subtitles. Running time: 1 hour 53 minutes. In theaters.

Review: In the eerie dystopia of ‘Plan 75,’ a mass suicide program takes effect

A woman in a uniform stands at a hotel cleaner's cart.

  • Copy Link URL Copied!

In “Plan 75,” an alternately warm and chilling dispatch from a dystopian near-future, death mostly happens out of sight, just a few steps beyond the frame. Sometimes we see the grim aftermath: a body slumped over at a table, another being stuffed into a car, still another being efficiently stripped of cash and jewelry. But the actual moment is usually left off-screen, and not solely out of respect for the deceased. In this quietly provocative debut feature, the Japanese writer-director Chie Hayakawa charts the insidious mentality of a social order that has begun executing its elder population with methodical efficiency, soothing reassurances and a neatly drawn curtain. Out of sight, out of mind, right?

Hayakawa, expanding productively on her 2018 short film, puts the lie to that assumption. She opens her story with a gauzily disorienting image that soon sharpens into a jolt of terror — one that may incline your thoughts, not that they need much inclining, toward recent gun-violence headlines . But this isn’t America; it’s Japan, or a version of Japan where public anger has turned against the country’s oldest citizens for their allegedly disproportionate drain on resources. To that end, the government authorizes Plan 75, a free-euthanasia program for citizens 75 or older, complete with a 100,000-yen stipend (less that $750 U.S.) that can be used for luxury spa services, funeral arrangements or a hell of a final meal.

We first hear about these perks in a queasy-funny scene in which a 78-year-old hotel cleaner named Michi (a superb Chieko Baisho) visits a Plan 75 clinic and leafs through a brochure with her friends. They’re amused, impressed, curious and probably more than a little alarmed, though the vibe of the place is so insistently relaxed — a vibe born out by the cinematographer Hideho Urata’s calm, measured compositions — that you can see the idea beginning to take root. In this and other moments, “Plan 75” seems to operate in a thematic zone that’s not quite satire and not quite science fiction; it falls somewhere in between, a speculative humanist-horror movie about the power of mass suggestion, in which a dreadful proposition has already become a legislated reality.

A man in a sweater in a sleek, white, sunny space.

What’s dreadful, to be clear, isn’t the concept of assisted suicide so much as the idea that it should be indiscriminately offered, prescribed and encouraged for a swath of the population whose existence others find inconvenient. For her part, Michi, with her good health and unflagging energy, thinks she has some time before having to really consider such a drastic next step. She’s wrong: When tragedy randomly strikes at work, Michi loses her job and, soon after, her apartment.

That she and others like her have been toiling in low-paying jobs, well past the standard retirement age, isn’t a script contrivance. It’s a reflection of a country where, as the Japan Times reported last year , 13.5% of the working population is over 65 and where, for the first time, those 75 and older now account for more than 15% of the total population.

Apart from a few fleeting topical nods, Hayakawa doesn’t delve too deeply into socioeconomic specifics, nor does she dramatize or even depict the power structures that implemented Plan 75 in the first place. And although her movie does eventually morph into a thriller of sorts, it never becomes as harrowing as the euthanasia clinic scenes in “Soylent Green” (1973) or as shocking as P.D. James’ description of a mass suicide ceremony gone horribly awry in her 1992 novel, “The Children of Men.” (That sequence was omitted from Alfonso Cuarón’s very good film adaptation .)

Hayakawa is interested in the logistical mechanics of the Plan 75 operation up to a point, but what she wants to leave us with, more than anything, is a sense of its cruel banality. A mass suicide program is merely the most extreme symptom of a society-wide malaise that systematically abuses and devalues its oldest citizens.

A woman in a hallway looks over her shoulder.

Hayakawa keeps her story at an intimate and, for the most part, effective human scale. Baisho’s beautifully calibrated performance holds us close, turning Michi’s every step — a brief stint as a traffic guard, a trip to a cafe she once frequented with her husband — into a quiet act of resistance against her perceived uselessness.

In time the movie introduces other key characters, like Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), a young Plan 75 employee who earnestly believes in the good of the company’s mission, only to have second thoughts when his long-estranged uncle (Takao Taka) signs up, and on his 75th birthday no less. (“That’s the spirit!” Hiromu’s colleague enthuses.) More peripheral to the action is Maria (Stefanie Arianne), a Filipina worker who finds herself carrying out some of the program’s least savory operations, all so she can make enough money to find a lifesaving operation for her young daughter.

There may be something overly tidy about the way the script uses Hiromu and Maria to illuminate some inconvenient truths about the system, and particularly the way it pulls its three narrative threads together at the climax. Even so, it’s all very much to Hayakawa’s point: The political is always personal, and ageist cruelty affects and implicates everyone. It also explains why “Plan 75,” for all its clinical gloom and enveloping despair, ends up sounding a curious note of optimism. Death may remain unseen, but so, for that matter, are the young and old, quietly mounting small yet hugely significant acts of resistance and survival.

In Japanese with English subtitles Not rated Running time: 1 hour, 52 minutes Playing: Starts May 5 at Laemmle Monica Film Center, Santa Monica

More to Read

A woman and a cat on a leash walk in a ruined New York City.

Review: ‘A Quiet Place: Day One’ is the rare prequel that outclasses the original for mood

June 28, 2024

A man in the woods looks down.

Review: In ‘Evil Does Not Exist,’ a woodsy community confronts malice of a modern stripe

May 3, 2024

A Japanese director poses for the camera.

How do you follow up ‘Drive My Car’? Director Ryûsuke Hamaguchi finds a new lane

May 2, 2024

Only good movies

Get the Indie Focus newsletter, Mark Olsen's weekly guide to the world of cinema.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

plan 75 movie reviews

Justin Chang was a film critic for the Los Angeles Times from 2016 to 2024. He won the 2024 Pulitzer Prize in criticism for work published in 2023. Chang is the author of the book “FilmCraft: Editing” and serves as chair of the National Society of Film Critics and secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.

More From the Los Angeles Times

LEFT: (L-R) JT Jackson on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Los Angeles, California. RIGHT: Kevin Hart poses at "The Greatest Roast of All Time: Tom Brady" at the Kia Forum, Sunday, May 5, 2024, in Inglewood, Calif. (Arnold Turner/Chris Pizzello/Associated Press)

Entertainment & Arts

Kevin Hart sued by an ex-friend for allegedly botching a deal to clear that man’s name

From left, actors Cameron Diaz, Eddie Murphy, Mike Myers and Antonio Banderas at the premiere 2010 of "Shrek Forever After"

‘Shrek 5’ set for July 2026 release; Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy and Cameron Diaz to return

Jennifer Garner arrives with daughter Violet Affleck, both in black gowns, at a White House dinner on Dec. 1, 2022

Violet Affleck reveals post-viral condition in public plea for ‘mask availability’

Kate Beckinsale in white blazer at 2023 The Hollywood Reporter's Women in Entertainment Gala at the Beverly Hills Hotel

Kate Beckinsale explains her mysterious six-week hospital stay: ‘stress and grief’

plan 75 movie reviews

  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

Plan 75 (2022)

Government program Plan 75 encourages senior citizens to be euthanized to remedy an aged society. An elderly woman whose means of survival are vanishing, a pragmatic Plan 75 salesman, and a ... Read all Government program Plan 75 encourages senior citizens to be euthanized to remedy an aged society. An elderly woman whose means of survival are vanishing, a pragmatic Plan 75 salesman, and a Filipino laborer face choices of life and death. Government program Plan 75 encourages senior citizens to be euthanized to remedy an aged society. An elderly woman whose means of survival are vanishing, a pragmatic Plan 75 salesman, and a Filipino laborer face choices of life and death.

  • Chie Hayakawa
  • Chieko Baishô
  • Hayato Isomura
  • Stefanie Arianne
  • 19 User reviews
  • 71 Critic reviews
  • 70 Metascore
  • 12 wins & 17 nominations

Trailer

Top cast 32

Chieko Baishô

  • Michi Kakutani
  • (as Baishô Chieko)

Hayato Isomura

  • Hiromu Okabe
  • (as Isomura Hayato)

Stefanie Arianne

  • (as Sutefanî Arian)
  • Uncle Yukio Okabe
  • (as Takao Taka)
  • Yôko Narimiya
  • (as Kawai Yûmi)
  • (as Ôkata Hisako)
  • (as Kushida Kazuyoshi)
  • Michi's Co-workers

Sheryl Ichikawa

  • All cast & crew
  • Production, box office & more at IMDbPro

More like this

Love Life

Did you know

  • Trivia Official submission of Japan for the 'Best International Feature Film' category of the 95th Academy Awards in 2023.
  • Goofs The time when the uncle is brought to the clinic is running back and forth. (See the time on the wristwatch then on the car navigation, and later on again on the wristwatch.)
  • Connections Featured in Amanda the Jedi Show: The Most Theatre Walkouts I've EVER Seen | Cannes 2022 Explained (2022)

User reviews 19

  • Jeremy_Urquhart
  • May 6, 2023
  • How long is Plan 75? Powered by Alexa
  • January 1, 2024 (United States)
  • Philippines
  • Loaded Films (Japan)
  • Official site (Japan)
  • Centre national du cinéma et de l'image animée (CNC)
  • Daluyong Studios
  • Doha Film Institute
  • See more company credits at IMDbPro

Technical specs

  • Runtime 1 hour 53 minutes
  • Dolby Digital

Related news

Contribute to this page.

Plan 75 (2022)

  • See more gaps
  • Learn more about contributing

More to explore

Recently viewed.

plan 75 movie reviews

an image, when javascript is unavailable

By providing your information, you agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy . We use vendors that may also process your information to help provide our services. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA Enterprise and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

‘Plan 75’ Review: Haunting Japanese Heartbreaker Imagines a Dystopia That Could Start Any Day Now

David ehrlich.

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share to Flipboard
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Show more sharing options
  • Submit to Reddit
  • Post to Tumblr
  • Print This Page
  • Share on WhatsApp

On July 26, 2016, a 26-year-old ex-employee of a Japanese care home for intellectually and mentally disabled people broke into his former place of work and stabbed 19 defenseless patients to death in their beds. Believing his massacre to be a kind of mercy for his victims — and a noble sacrifice for the benefit of the entire nation — the killer wrote that he envisioned “a world where a person with multiple disabilities can be euthanized, with an agreement from their guardians, when it is difficult for the person to carry out household and social activities.”

The killer claimed that doing so was a necessary step to protect the economy of the world’s most rapidly aging country; an economy that’s stressed even further by the highest life expectancy of any country on Earth, and crushes its young people under the financial burden of paying for that longevity in the face of Japan’s strained pension funds. He claimed that the elderly recognized themselves as the personification of that burden, and were desperate for a way to resolve the inconvenience of their own deathlessness.

Related Stories ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ Review: Scarlett Johansson Goes Don Draper and Doris Day in a Fizzy, Fleeting Space-Race Rom-Com ‘Dandelion’ Review: KiKi Layne Takes the Power and Passion of ‘Once’ on Distinctly American Road Trip

The mass slaughter in Sagamihara was an act of civilian violence so casual and horrifying that it seemed to owe as much to contemporary American fascism as it did historical (and also mythical ) Japanese notions of nationalistic self-sacrifice, but the killer was confident that his bloodshed would strike a particularly dissonant chord in a country where troubling ones neighbors is often internalized as an immortal act.

To judge by Chie Hayakawa’s powerfully sobering and sinisterly benign “Plan 75” — a scripted drama born from the ghoulish plausibility of the murderer’s vision — he may have been right. The scariest thing about Hayakawa’s film isn’t its familiar depiction of a society that privileges human output over human dignity, but rather its soft dystopian sketch of a society that’s able to soft-shoe around dehumanization and/or sell it as an act of grace.

A loose knot of interconnected stories that often suggests a twisted inversion of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “After Life” (Hayakawa taps into that film’s slow-motion urgency, even if she fails to match its transcendent effect), “Plan 75” is held together by the contemplative nature of its approach and the gentleness of its argument, both of which allow this movie to annihilate the economic case for euthanasia without alienating those of us who believe in the right to merciful end-of-life care.

The film opens with its most jarring and aggressive scene as something of a bait-and-switch: An oblique restaging of the Sagamihara attack that tees up an alternate reality in which Japan effectively agreed to the killer’s terms. In Hayakawa’s drama, the massacre is but one of the many age-related, financially motivated hate crimes that has prompted the government to create a social welfare program in which citizens above the age of 74 can volunteer to be euthanized in exchange for $1,000.

But that cash pittance isn’t the real incentive. For one thing, you can’t take it with you. For another, the program is designed to target people who have no one to spend it on. Plan 75 is meant to attract — or coerce — lonely pensioners with tedious jobs who feel like leaving the world before their time might be more gracious than overstaying their welcome.

Of course, it doesn’t matter how friendly the young Plan 75 staff might be (Hayakawa wisely neglects to show us any of higher-level government functions), or how personalized the onboarding process is to each volunteer (so long as it doesn’t take too long). The minute Plan 75 was signed into law, it put an unbearable onus of expectation on every Japanese citizen of a certain age.

Now it’s as if, with each breath, they have to justify their continued existence to everyone they meet. And to themselves. That kind of pressure could force the hand of even the most beloved and well-supported person in their twilight years, let alone a semi-frail and seemingly family-less hotel maid like Michi (Chieko Baisho). From the moment this movie starts, it’s only a matter of time before she numbly begins to fill out the paperwork and prepare herself for cremation.

Chieko Baisho in

The rest of “Plan 75” is no less violent than its bloody prologue, its veneer of gentility just makes it seem that way. Eager and handsome young government lackey Hiromu (Hayato Isomura) is the kind of gentle-natured soul who wouldn’t hurt a fly, and yet he doesn’t think twice about a job that requires him to register new Plan 75 patients. In one brief scene typical of the film’s glancing fury, Hiromu blithely participates in a demonstration of anti-homeless park benches. As Akira Kurosawa’s “Ikiru” would suggest, the soul of a city is reflected in its parks and playgrounds.

Later, Hiromu will experience a change of heart when his estranged uncle submits to Plan 75. Hayakawa obfuscates such conventional developments to a degree that makes them feel less staid — if also less satisfying, as is the case with an unformed plot thread about a Filipina nurse who takes a job at Plan 75 to help raise money for her sick daughter back home — but her film is always more compelling when it privileges mournful details over bigger story beats.

That’s especially true when it comes to Michi, whose despondent surrender to the Plan 75 process is raw and heartbreaking right up until the moment when Hayakawa threatens to interrupt it in the dying minutes. The quiet resignation of Basho’s performance faintly echoes that of “Tokyo Story” actress Chieko Higashiyama, but it’s further complicated here by a deep well of resentment, and also a last-ditch grasp at getting something more out of life.

Michi and the young woman assigned to prepare her for euthanization develop a protocol-breaking friendship in a well-rendered subplot that evokes “Ikiru” in its own way. The warmth and compassion these strangers show to each other is painfully counterbalanced by the purpose of the government program that brought them together, and the benign sterility of Hideho Urata’s cinematography — at once both menacing and melancholy — allows the spontaneous beauty of that friendship to sit alongside the inevitable loss that overshadows it. What good is a healthy economy when the richest parts of life are stripped of their value?

“Plan 75” isn’t for or against assisted suicide, but it tenderly laments a society in which “death with dignity” is only offered as compensation for a life without it. This is an ultra-delicate whisper of a drama — the kind in which a typical scene might consist of an old woman sitting alone in her apartment for several minutes of haunted silence. And yet the anger that fringes such bittersweet moments gradually accumulates into a palpable and lingering rage at how good we’ve become at branding cruelty as compassion.

Rewatching the movie, I was morbidly amused by the opening title card announcing that its production was subsidized by the Japanese government. I wonder how they felt about the role they play in this story, especially the part when Plan 75 proves so lucrative that rumors begin to swirl about rebranding it as Plan 65 instead.

KimStim will release “Plan 75” at the IFC Center on Friday, April 21. It will open in Los Angeles at the Laemmle Glendale on Friday, May 5.

Most Popular

You may also like.

Danny Elfman Hit With Defamation Lawsuit by Fellow Composer Who Accuses Him of Egregious Sexual Harassment

an image, when javascript is unavailable

‘Plan 75’ Review: Japan’s Thought-Provoking Oscar Submission Chides Society for Disrespecting Its Seniors

In this sci-fi-tinged social drama, first-time director Chie Hayakawa suggests a program that would encourage the elderly to terminate their own lives, then raises all the reasons it’s a bad idea.

By Peter Debruge

Peter Debruge

Chief Film Critic

  • ‘Wallace & Gromit’ Creator Nick Park Credits Disney for Sparking Interest in Animation, Teases ‘Vengeance Most Fowl’ and Feathers’ Long-Awaited Return 8 hours ago
  • ‘Longlegs’ Review: Nicolas Cage Worms His Way Into Your Nightmares With Dread-Filled Serial Killer Thriller 4 days ago
  • ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ Review: A Rocket’s Red Glare Gives Proof to Scarlett Johansson and Channing Tatum’s Screen Chemistry 4 days ago

Plan 75

Related Stories

Ame institute to host “state of the creative industries” panel, sponsored by variety vip+, your favorite comedians are on the road: here's how to buy tickets, popular on variety.

Hayakawa approaches her subject with utter seriousness from the opening scene, which picks up right after a gunman has opened fire on a retirement home — an extreme sign that public sentiment has turned on the country’s resource-draining oldsters. Getting down to the nitty gritty, as it were, the helmer aims to anticipate the logistics (how the deed is done, from counseling phone calls in the lead-up to the death wards where patients are gassed), as well as any real-world repercussions her proposal would have.

These are all compelling questions, though Hiyakawa rushes past the most obvious one: Would Japan — or any country — really embrace a program like Plan 75? Presenting that premise as a done deal is the one thing that qualifies this movie as science fiction; the rest amounts to a kind of melancholy realism, as Hiyakawa focuses on how shabbily many elders are already being treated: abandoned by relatives, ignored by social services, left to fend for themselves.

At 78, Michi (Baishô Chieko) has reached the age where she should be able to relax and enjoy her sunset years. Instead, no one will rent an apartment to someone so old, and she has trouble finding a job to cover the basic costs of life. Tapping into a kind of collective guilt (as if Michi were real and the audience were responsible for her plight), Hiyakawa shows this kindly old woman wearing one of those fluorescent orange vests, reduced to directing traffic in the cold. Things aren’t much easier for Maria (Stefanie Arianne), the sweet Filipino nurse and young mother who assists Michi through the process. The world can be cruel and lonely, Hiyakawa reminds, while also embracing the small but significant reasons to live, like the bond that forms between these two characters.

Another customer, widowed Yukio (Takao Taka), has fewer misgivings about the program. He feels he’s lived a good life and seems ready to join his wife. But something unexpected happens at his preliminary interview: Yukio’s processing agent is none other than his nephew Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), whom he hasn’t seen in years. With good reason, Hiromu is obliged to recuse himself, since the meeting gets him worrying about Yukio’s well-being. A few days later, behind his employer’s back, Hiromu tries to talk his uncle out of his decision. Cue the sad trombone when he arrives too late to save the man’s life.

“Plan 75” might have been a risible exercise in emotional manipulation if not for the sensitive tone with which Hiyakawa approaches all of her characters. The film’s underlying agenda is hardly subtle, and yet, Hiyakawa leaves more than enough room for audiences to disagree — that is, to consider the actual merits of deciding the hour and means of one’s own exit. Though it remains taboo in many cultures, plenty of people already elect to die by assisted suicide (with Jean-Luc Godard being a prominent recent example and Alain Delon having revealed his intention). Still, it’s something altogether different for a society to encourage it.

Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival, Sept. 17, 2022. Also in Cannes, Busan film festivals. Running time: 113 MIN.

  • Production: (Japan-France-Philippines-Qatar) A Loaded Films, Urban Factory, Fusee production, in co-production with Happinet-Phantom Studios, Dongyu Club, WOWOW, with the support of La Region Île de France, Doha Film Institute, La Fondation Franco-Japonaise Sasakawa, Aide Aux Cinémas du Monde, CNC, Institut Français. (World sales: Urban Sales, Paris.) Producers: Eiko Mizuno-Gray, Jason Gray, Frédéric Corvez, Maéva Savinien. Co-producer: Alemberg Ang.
  • Crew: Director, writer: Chie Hayakawa. Camera: Hideho Urata. Editor: Anne Klotz. Music: Rémi Boubal.

More from Variety

Jodie foster says directors ‘don’t listen to me’ sometimes and ‘i’ll work on a movie where i have to do 120 takes’ and respond: ‘alright, bye’, ai terms remain vague as iatse releases its tentative basic agreement summary, awards season calendar (2024-2025): key dates and timeline for oscars, emmys, golden globes, grammys, sag and more, ‘inside out 2’ is 2024’s first animated feature oscar contender. will the academy feel it for best picture too, movies are dead wait, they’re back the delusional phase of hollywood’s frantic summer, film academy shuts down digital magazine a.frame, lays off editorial staffer and contributing freelancers (exclusive), more from our brands, hear emo powerhouse mayday parade’s tender new single, paris police are cracking down on counterfeit luxury goods ahead of the olympics, apax partners sells final 10% stake in genius sports, the best loofahs and body scrubbers, according to dermatologists, alf star benji gregory dead at 46.

Quantcast

Log in or sign up for Rotten Tomatoes

Trouble logging in?

By continuing, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes.

Email not verified

Let's keep in touch.

Rotten Tomatoes Newsletter

Sign up for the Rotten Tomatoes newsletter to get weekly updates on:

  • Upcoming Movies and TV shows
  • Rotten Tomatoes Podcast
  • Media News + More

By clicking "Sign Me Up," you are agreeing to receive occasional emails and communications from Fandango Media (Fandango, Vudu, and Rotten Tomatoes) and consenting to Fandango's Privacy Policy and Terms and Policies . Please allow 10 business days for your account to reflect your preferences.

OK, got it!

  • What's the Tomatometer®?
  • Login/signup

plan 75 movie reviews

Movies in theaters

  • Opening this week
  • Top box office
  • Coming soon to theaters
  • Certified fresh movies

Movies at home

  • Fandango at Home
  • Prime Video
  • Most popular streaming movies
  • What to Watch New

Certified fresh picks

  • 74% MaXXXine Link to MaXXXine
  • 90% Kill Link to Kill
  • 85% Remembering Gene Wilder Link to Remembering Gene Wilder

New TV Tonight

  • 91% Sunny: Season 1
  • -- Vikings: Valhalla: Season 3
  • 71% Sausage Party: Foodtopia: Season 1
  • -- The Serpent Queen: Season 2
  • -- Me: Season 1
  • -- The Bachelorette: Season 21
  • -- Mastermind: To Think Like a Killer: Season 1
  • -- Melissa Etheridge: I'm Not Broken: Season 1
  • -- All American: Homecoming: Season 3

Most Popular TV on RT

  • 81% Star Wars: The Acolyte: Season 1
  • 100% Supacell: Season 1
  • 90% The Bear: Season 3
  • 93% The Boys: Season 4
  • 90% House of the Dragon: Season 2
  • 76% Presumed Innocent: Season 1
  • 93% My Lady Jane: Season 1
  • 82% Dark Matter: Season 1
  • Best TV Shows
  • Most Popular TV
  • TV & Streaming News

Certified fresh pick

  • 95% We Are Lady Parts: Season 2 Link to We Are Lady Parts: Season 2
  • All-Time Lists
  • Binge Guide
  • Comics on TV
  • Five Favorite Films
  • Video Interviews
  • Weekend Box Office
  • Weekly Ketchup
  • What to Watch

Every Shrek Movie, Ranked by Tomatometer

100 Best Movies on Tubi (July 2024)

What to Watch: In Theaters and On Streaming

‘Seen on the Screen’ Podcast: A Celebration of Universal Stories 

The Most Anticipated Movies of 2024

  • Trending on RT
  • Shark Movies
  • Mission Impossible 8
  • A24 Horror Movies
  • The Bikeriders

Plan 75 Reviews

plan 75 movie reviews

The pacified approach to dystopia from Hayakawa feels proper for Plan 75.

Full Review | Jul 7, 2024

plan 75 movie reviews

Hayakawa’s quietly realist treatment of the dystopian premise makes for haunting viewing.

Full Review | Dec 8, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

This is a muted, resigned story about the way that countries and corporations follow their own self-interests rather than helping those most in need. Plan 75 may seem like it’s about ageing, but more accurately it is about the importance of community.

plan 75 movie reviews

Haunting and thought-provoking, but nowhere as grim as it ought to be, this one sticks with you as every great work of science fiction should.

Full Review | Original Score: 5/5 | Dec 8, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

This is strong work for a debut feature, and while not presenting assisted suicide itself with the greatest of nuance, Plan 75 is an accomplished portrait of capitalist alienation.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Dec 8, 2023

This is not a story about despair -- it's one that inspires hope and, if we're lucky, change.

Full Review | Original Score: 8/10 | Dec 8, 2023

It's a very very moving and affecting film... It's terribly distressing, but it's very, very low-key, and it also actually allows itself to have moments of redemption in its later sections.

plan 75 movie reviews

The first feature from Japanese female director Chie Hayakawa seethes with violence under its soft-spoken exterior.

Stylistically, it looks a bit like a training film. What this means -- the brilliance of this film -- is that Hayakawa is able to make the idea of wiping out a generation seem drably normal within about quarter of an hour, something to ponder in itself.

Full Review | Sep 21, 2023

Lest this sound too somber, know that the tone and staging are thoughtful, even heartening.

Full Review | Aug 11, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

Those who let the sensitivity of Plan 75 wash over them will walk out of the theatre and immediately call someone they love.

Full Review | Jul 24, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

The best speculative fiction is fact taken to its extreme conclusion. In its pointed observation, Plan 75 echoes Cuarón’s Children of Men. One hopes it proves more warning than prophecy.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Jul 12, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

One can find discreet compassion without condescension; and that’s positive. However, some of the parts are more engrossing than the whole.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | Jun 25, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

It's really quite extraordinary... A first-rate debut.

Full Review | May 17, 2023

In its double portrait of the neglected elderly and the guilty young, the film offers a timely, compassionate reaffirmation of family ties in a fast-changing world.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | May 15, 2023

Plan 75 is impressive in its subtle humanism and to be commended for not relying on horror for its impact but it is perhaps a little too sombre to be effective.

This is subdued storytelling that, while it drags a little in its pacing, asks tough questions about society’s relationship with elderly people.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | May 14, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

The high concept becomes a near irrelevance as we struggle with a humanist story that lacks the emotional zest Hirokazu Koreeda habitually brings to related material. The messages are inarguable. The means of delivery leaves something to be desired.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | May 12, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

A knockout premise meets an execution that’s mostly tentative jabs in this intriguing Japanese social satire.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | May 11, 2023

plan 75 movie reviews

With Plan 75, Hayakawa hauntingly confronts the spectator with what would happen if the existence of the subject was radically reduced by the government to how much he/she financially contributes to the society.

Full Review | May 11, 2023

Cinephile Corner

Movie Reviews, Rankings, Film News and More

Home » Movie Reviews » Plan 75 Review: A Haunting Reflection of Aging and Good Grace

Plan 75 Review: A Haunting Reflection of Aging and Good Grace

Review: Plan 75 is a challenging yet undeniably impactful film. It’s a powerful indictment of societal ageism and a stark reminder of the human cost of progress. Chie Hayakawa directs a wonderfully constructed soft sci-fi entry.

Plan 75 movie review 2023

Chie Hayakawa ‘s Plan 75 is not a film for the faint of heart. It’s a dystopian gut punch that confronts us with a chillingly plausible future where euthanasia for the elderly is not just legal, but actively encouraged by the government. Set in a near-future Japan grappling with a rapidly aging population, Plan 75 paints a stark portrait of societal dehumanization disguised as an act of “grace.”

Hayakawa doesn’t shy away from the ethical complexities of her premise. Instead of preaching, she provokes. Through three interweaving storylines, she forces us to grapple with the unthinkable: What would it be like to live in a world where your usefulness is measured by your remaining years?

Michi Tsunotani ( Chieko Baisho in a masterful late-career performance) is the emotional core of the film. An elderly woman facing financial hardship and social isolation, she becomes a reluctant participant in Plan 75. Baisho’s nuanced portrayal captures the quiet heartbreak of a life nearing its end, forced to make impossible choices under a crushing system.

Recent Movie Reviews from Cinephile Corner

  • Despicable Me 4 Review (2024)
  • Falcon Lake Review (2023)
  • Faults Review (2014)

Hiromu ( Hayato Isomura ), a young Plan 75 salesman, represents the moral gray areas of this dystopia. He believes in the program’s supposed benefits, yet struggles with the personal cost of selling death. Maria ( Stefanie Arianne ), a Filipino immigrant working in the care industry, adds a layer of economic disparity to the mix. Caught between survival and empathy, she navigates a system that exploits both the young and the old.

While the film’s cinematography is deliberately muted, reflecting the emotional bleakness of the world, it occasionally erupts with moments of unexpected beauty. A scene bathed in cherry blossoms offers a fleeting glimpse of hope amidst the encroaching darkness.

Hayakawa’s masterstroke lies in the film’s open-ended conclusion. Plan 75 doesn’t offer easy answers. Instead, it leaves us with a profound sense of unease and a renewed appreciation for the preciousness of life. This is not a film to be “enjoyed” in the traditional sense, but rather one to be experienced and wrestled with.

Plan 75 is a challenging yet undeniably impactful film. It’s a powerful indictment of societal ageism and a stark reminder of the human cost of progress. While it may leave you emotionally drained, it will also stay with you long after its runtime finishes, prompting crucial conversations about the future of aging and the very definition of a “good life.”

Genre: Drama , Science Fiction

Watch Plan 75 on The Criterion Channel and VOD

Join our newsletter

Plan 75 (2023) Cast and Credits

Plan 75 movie poster 2023

Chieko Baisho  as Mishi Kakutani

Hayato Isomura  as Himoru Okabe

Stefanie Arianne as Maria

Yuumi Kawai  as Yoko Narimiya

Takao Taka  as Yukio Okabe

Director: Chie Hayakawa

Writers: Jason Gray , Chie Hayakawa

Cinematography: Hideho Urata

Editor: Anne Klotz

Composer: Rémi Boubal

Reviews for Films like Plan 75

All of Us Strangers movie review

CINEPHILE CORNER

Newsletter Sign Up

X / Twitter

MOVIE REVIEWS

Best New Movies

All Reviews

LISTS AND RANKINGS

Director Rankings

Year End Rankings

Latest News

Copyright © 2024 Cinephile Corner

Design by ThemesDNA.com

Your browser is not supported

Sorry but it looks as if your browser is out of date. To get the best experience using our site we recommend that you upgrade or switch browsers.

Find a solution

  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to navigation

plan 75 movie reviews

  • Back to parent navigation item
  • Digital Editions
  • Screen Network
  • Stars Of Tomorrow
  • The Big Screen Awards
  • FYC screenings
  • World of Locations
  • UK in focus
  • Job vacancies
  • Cannes Close-Up
  • Distribution
  • Staff moves
  • Territories
  • UK & Ireland
  • North America
  • Asia Pacific
  • Middle East & Africa
  • Future Leaders
  • My Screen Life
  • Karlovy Vary
  • San Sebastian
  • Sheffield Doc/Fest
  • Middle East
  • Box Office Reports
  • International
  • Golden Globes
  • European Film Awards
  • Stars of Tomorrow
  • Cannes jury grid

CROPPED COVER  SOT

Subscribe to Screen International

  • Monthly print editions
  • Awards season weeklies
  • Stars of Tomorrow and exclusive supplements
  • Over 16 years of archived content
  • More from navigation items

‘Plan 75’: Cannes Review

By Tim Grierson, Senior US Critic 2022-05-20T16:13:00+01:00

This dystopian debut about aging and euthanasia in Japan is moving and understated

Plan 75

Source: Festival de Cannes

Dir: Chie Hayakawa. Japan/France/Philippines/Qatar. 2022. 112 mins.

In Plan 75 , a Japan of the near-future offers its elderly citizens an opportunity to euthanise themselves, a troubling scenario that results in a meditative drama touching on regret, loneliness and soulless bureaucracy. Chie Hayakawa’s feature directorial debut doesn’t have the dark dystopian undertow of bygone sci-fi films such as Soylent Green , and yet beneath its gentle surface is an upsetting commentary on the way that societies toss away those they judge no longer to be valuable.

Plan 75  may seem like it’s about ageing, but more accurately it is about the importance of community

Premiering in Un Certain Regard, Plan 75 will appeal more to arthouse crowds than genre fans, but anyone interested in thoughtful science fiction should seek out this modest, affecting picture. Some fine performances — especially from Chieko Baisho as an aged widow facing the end — elevate Plan 75 ’s quiet outrage.

Baisho plays Michi, who works as a hotel housekeeper before being terminated, fearful that she may not be able to support herself and need to sign up for Japan’s Plan 75, which allows those 75 and older to be euthanised, receiving a small payment for volunteering. But Plan 75 also looks at two other characters: Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), a Plan 75 salesman facing a crisis of conscience; and Maria (Stefanie Arianne), a young mother who takes a low-level job at the company to help pay for her daughter’s lifesaving surgery.

Hayakawa expands her 2018 short to question the societal repercussions that would occur from such a policy, which in the film has been in place for about three years. Plan 75 eventually reveals some disturbing secrets about the program, but those prove less insidious than the day-to-day realities that Hayakawa’s calm camera captures. Indeed, each of the film’s three leads will, in their own way, be impacted by the intolerant attitude of the culture toward the aged.

These parallel storylines are often moving in understated ways. Michi, who has no family, finds herself turning to Yoko (Yuumi Kawai), a Plan 75 customer-service phone agent who becomes emotionally involved in the older woman’s life. Meanwhile, Hiromu, who wholeheartedly believes in Plan 75’s compassionate termination of life, rethinks that stance once his estranged uncle (Taka Takao) visits his office to seek to end his life. As for Maria, the ghoulishness of the job that awaits her shouldn’t be spoiled, but it speaks to the callous disregard of the dead that occurs in even so-called civilised societies.

Plan 75 never pities its aged characters, and Baisho is superb at playing a woman whose growing sense of worthlessness starts to sap her life force. Poignant static shots of Michi from behind, staring out her full-length apartment window, contemplating the futility of everything — or possibly even jumping to her death — convey so much about the terror and isolation of old age. Baisho’s weary expressions bring forceful anguish to the role.

Isomura and Arianne aren’t quite as effective, in part because their characters aren’t as deeply developed, but these younger perspectives are crucial to juxtapose with Michi’s ordeal. The fact that Maria has an ailing daughter brings a bitter irony to the proceedings: death is a reality all must face, no matter one’s age.

Hayakawa doesn’t get hung up on the logistics of her dystopian premise — nor does she worry about indulging thriller conventions as we reach the final reels. Instead, this is a muted, resigned story about the way that countries and corporations follow their own self-interests rather than helping those most in need. Plan 75 may seem like it’s about ageing, but more accurately it is about the importance of community — the hope that someone will remember us after we’re gone.

Production companies: Loaded Films, Urban Factory, Happinet-Phantom Studios, Dongyu Club, WOWOW, Fusee 

International sales: Urban Sales,  [email protected]

Producers: Eiko Mizuno-Gray, Jason Gray, Frédéric Corvez, Maéva Savinien 

Screenplay: Chie Hayakawa, based on a story by Chie Hayakawa & Jason Gray

Art direction: Setsuko Shiokawa

Editing: Anne Klotz

Cinematography: Hideho Urata

Music: Remi Boubal

Main cast: Chieko Baisho, Hayato Isomura, Stefanie Arianne

  • Un Certain Regard

Related articles

Horizon An American Saga_2

Theatrical release of Kevin Costner’s ‘Horizon: An American Saga – Chapter 2’ delayed

2024-07-10T19:32:00Z By Jeremy Kay

First instalment has earned $22.6m at North American box office.

film fests 2024

2024 film festivals and markets calendar: latest dates

2024-07-10T16:34:00Z By Ben Dalton

Bookmark this page to keep track of all the latest festival dates.

Twisters

‘Twisters’: Review

2024-07-10T16:00:00Z By Tim Grierson Senior US Critic

Daisy Edgar-Jones and Glen Powell square up to impressive VFX in this sluggish sequel to the 1996 hit 

More from Reviews

Fly Me To The Moon

‘Fly Me To The Moon’: Review

2024-07-09T13:00:00Z By Nikki Baughan

Scarlett Johansson and Channing Tatum headline this moon landing romcom that fails to lift off

Longlegs

‘Longlegs’: Review

2024-07-08T08:00:00Z By Tim Grierson Senior US Critic

FBI agent Maika Monroe and serial killer Nicolas Cage face off in Osgood Perkins’ horror of human depravity

A Sudden Glimpse To Deeper Things

‘A Sudden Glimpse To Deeper Things’: Karlovy Vary Review

2024-07-04T11:18:00Z By Wendy Ide

Mark Cousins examines the life and work of Scottish artist Wilhelmina Barns-Graham in his latest cine-essay 

  • Advertise with Screen
  • A - Z of Subjects
  • Connect with us on Facebook
  • Connect with us on Twitter
  • Connect with us on Linked in
  • Connect with us on YouTube
  • Connect with us on Instagram>

Screen International is the essential resource for the international film industry. Subscribe now for monthly editions, awards season weeklies, access to the Screen International archive and supplements including Stars of Tomorrow and World of Locations.

  • Screen Awards
  • Media Production & Technology Show
  • Terms and conditions
  • Privacy & Cookie Policy
  • Copyright © 2023 Media Business Insight Limited
  • Subscription FAQs

Site powered by Webvision Cloud

Suggestions

Plan 75 review: a quietly tragic depiction of a world where empathy is scarce.

Hayakawa Chie reveals a culture that seems almost mobilized to destroy its own soul.

Plan 75

Hayakawa Chie’s Plan 75 depicts Japan as necro-political dystopia where the elderly are encouraged to euthanize themselves in order to assuage the nation’s economic distress. People 75 and older who apply for the “Plan 75” program, an operation driven by uncannily pragmatic end-of-life protocols, receive 100,000 yen, or approximately $800, for their self-sacrifice, which they’re free to spend on, say, a final domestic trip or expensive meal. Within 10 years, we learn, people 65 and over will become eligible for the opportunity.

With stinging precision, Hayakawa reveals a culture that seems almost mobilized to push corporately assisted suicide on those who are a burden to health care and financial systems. And as one expects from a sterile bureaucratic process, applying for Plan 75 is, in the grand scheme of things, quite a breeze: Lines are open 24/7 and attendants are friendly and efficient. Applying for social aid, on the other hand, is a big hassle, so why bother with that?

This tale of human solitude and social cruelty primarily focuses on Hiromi (Isomura Hayato), a recruitment agent for Plan 75; Maria (Stefanie Arianne Akashi), a Filipino woman driven to work for Plan 75 when her daughter’s health takes a turn for the worse; and Michi (Baishô Chieko), an aging and lonely hotel maid seduced by Plan 75 after losing her job. While the plot lends itself to a critique of neoliberal measures and how a nation peddles fantasies of martyrdom and views the elderly as disposable, it’s when Hayakawa homes in on her characters’ personal dilemmas that the film goes beyond its allegorical function.

At the start, the film seems destined to succumb to gimmickry, as the rituals of Plan 75 define the background, middle ground, and foreground of every sequence, instead of a general atmosphere within which characters live out their dramas. But it shifts gears once Plan 75’s recruiters’ robotic veneer begins to show signs of life. In one scene, Hiromi realizes that one of his new clients is his own uncle, Yukio (Takao Taka), which causes old wounds to reopen, though the old man only makes the most perfunctory attempts at addressing them.

YouTube video

Because so much of Hayakawa’s film is given over to depictions of the procedures, formalities, and impersonal administration that define Plan 75, even the tiniest spark of feeling comes as a relief. In that sense, Michi’s subplot is especially captivating, and for the way that Hayakawa avoids sentimentality, treating the timid possibilities of a connection between human beings that’s beyond the register of a transaction with the utmost care.

Michi, like other Plan 75 clients, seems to be in dire need of therapy or friendship, not euthanasia. The woman is full of stories and driven by a hunger for life, and in her customer service agent, Yoko (Kawai Yuumi), she finds a pair of willing ears. When Michi proposes to meet Yoko, she’s told that clients and employees aren’t allowed to, so as to prevent them from becoming emotionally attached or, worse, from changing their minds about being euthanized.

Michi and Yoko meet anyway, and they enjoy a nice conversation over cream sodas. The hyper-controlled and timed encounters between the elderly Michi and the normally impassive representative of the state and of death itself—which are one in the same in the context of this film—movingly give way to free-flowing bliss and the women go bowling together. Will Michi break her Plan 75 contract? Will Yoko stage some 11th-hour operation to save Michi?

Whatever happens, the film suggests, it’s always already too late for any of it to matter. All of the things that have remained unsaid between generations have been cemented. A nation has reduced its citizens to one of two possible roles: disposable encumbrance or death merchant. And yet there’s something about the chance that, in a moment of euphoria or cultural recklessness, someone might break the code of silence and an honest word will come out: a confession, a declaration of love, or a demand for it. And while such moments may never materialize, the ecstasy of life inhabits precisely in the possibility that they would.

You might be interested in

Howl’s Moving Castle

Review: Howl’s Moving Castle

plan 75 movie reviews

Diego Semerene

Diego Semerene is an assistant professor of queer and transgender media at the University of Amsterdam.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Final Cut

Final Cut Review: Michel Hazanavicius’s Hollow Celebration of DIY Creativity

The Bob’s Burgers Movie

The Bob’s Burgers Movie Review: An Uproarious and Sweet Ode to Family

Sign Up for Our Weekly Newsletter

an image, when javascript is unavailable

site categories

Sony wins michael crichton-james patterson bestseller ‘eruption’ in seven-figure deal, breaking news.

Cannes Review: Chie Hayakawa’s ‘Plan 75’

By Stephanie Bunbury

Stephanie Bunbury

More stories by stephanie.

  • ‘Kalki 2898 AD’ Review: Prabhas Epic Is Terrific, Cathartic Fun
  • ‘Memoir Of A Snail’ Review: Australian Claymation Master Adam Elliot Reflects On Love, Grief And Human Weakness – Annecy
  • Cannes Film Festival 2024: Read All Of Deadline’s Movie Reviews, Including Palme d’Or Winner ‘Anora’

Plan 75

A diet of rice and tofu, plenty of regular, gentle exercise and excellent hospitals: the Japanese have nailed the formula for getting old prolifically. With a little less than 30% of the population over 65, Japanese society is now officially termed as “super-aged.” Meanwhile, thanks to a low birth rate and an ingrained opposition to immigration, the total number of people is falling dramatically. Each year, there are fewer younger people to look after more older ones. It’s a slow-burn economic crisis.

Of course, there is an obvious solution, unthinkable in real life but very much in working order in Chie Hayakawa’s Plan 75 , which screened in Cannes ’ Un Certain Regard . The plan of the title is a hypothetical government-funded program that merely offers seniors the chance to be bumped off quietly. It is never acknowledged to be a mass extermination program. On the contrary, it is entirely benevolent.

Related Stories

Elvis

'Elvis' Review: Tom Hanks And Austin Butler In Baz Luhrmann's Musical Feast Of A Biopic

Roman Polanski L.A. rape case

Tentative Settlement Reached In Roman Polanski's 1973 L.A. Rape Case - Update

There are little nudges along the way, it’s true. Those who volunteer may receive a cash gift for that final-fling holiday, a free funeral, even the chance to die in a five-star spa resort. Muzak-filled infomercials playing in every hospital waiting room gently remind potential clients that nobody wants to become a burden and that the Japanese have a proud history of self-sacrifice for the greater good. Suicide is not compulsory, but grab the chance while you can!

Michi (Chieko Baisho, giving a truly magnificent and moving performance) is 78 and still works as a hotel cleaner. All her colleagues are similarly elderly, a happy crew who pool their lunch treats – “those apples look yummy!” – and gather outside work for economical fun outings. When one collapses on the job, however, they are all forcibly retired. Coincidentally, Michi discovers that her apartment block is about to be demolished. She has no income and nowhere to live. A man behind a desk suggests she could go on welfare, but her expression of dismay tells us that this is seen as akin to sleeping on a park bench. Better death than humiliation.

Actually, even park benches are becoming an elusive option. We first meet Hiromu, (Hayato Isamura) a young social welfare department bureaucrat, as he tests new arm rests being retrofitted to existing benches to deter rough sleepers. He laughs as he rates each one for discomfort; the meanness of this policy doesn’t even occur to him. It is only later, as he passes an outdoor soup kitchen, that we see his salaryman’s bravado slip. It falls from him entirely when his own uncle comes into his office, ready to sign up for Plan 75.

Cut to Maria (Stefanie Arianne) a warm-hearted Filipina care-worker whose church elder helps her get a better-paid job at Plan 75 “working with old people, I think, but for more money.” One of Maria’s jobs as a Plan 75 carer is to empty the handbags left behind by the people who have come there to die. It takes only a few seconds to upend and clean out the last scraps of an old lady’s life.

A life that is still vivid and valuable, as Plan 75 counsellor (Yumi Kawai) recognizes when Michi is added to her list of clients. The counsellors are supposed to ring the imminently dead every few days and, in the guise of caring friend, ensure they don’t change their minds. Instead, this sweet young woman takes Michi to go bowling. Seeing Michi’s excitement when she scores a strike with her second ball, high-fiving the young folk who congratulate her, almost finishes her. It almost finished me. Fortunately, Michi is not quite finished herself.

There is nothing flashy about the way Hayakawa approaches her subject, no dramatic chases or rescues or confrontations; this is sober, thoughtful storytelling. There is nothing dystopian about it, either; most of it is set in grey, strip-lit departmental offices and well-scrubbed hospitals – overwhelmingly ordinary places – where everyone is trying to do the right thing. Stylistically, it looks a bit like a training film. What this means – the brilliance of this film – is that Hayakawa is able to make the idea of wiping out a generation seem drably normal within about quarter of an hour, something to ponder in itself. Could this really happen? By the time she’s done with us, it feels as if it already has.

Must Read Stories

Sony wins michael crichton-james patterson book ‘eruption’ in 7-figure deal.

plan 75 movie reviews

George Clooney Becomes Latest To Call On Joe Biden To Step Aside

Kevin costner’s ‘horizon: an american saga – chapter 2’ release delayed, renée zellweger to lead ‘jane smith’ series in works at max based on patterson novel.

Subscribe to Deadline Breaking News Alerts and keep your inbox happy.

Read More About:

No comments.

Deadline is a part of Penske Media Corporation. © 2024 Deadline Hollywood, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Quantcast

  • Subscribe Digital Print

The Japan Times

  • Tokyo governor race
  • Extreme heat
  • Overtourism
  • Latest News
  • Deep Dive Podcast

Today's print edition

Home Delivery

  • Crime & Legal
  • Science & Health
  • More sports
  • CLIMATE CHANGE
  • SUSTAINABILITY
  • EARTH SCIENCE
  • Food & Drink
  • Style & Design
  • TV & Streaming
  • Entertainment news

‘Plan 75’: A chilling look at a callous future society

In a near-future Japan that looks very much like the present, the government has unveiled a modest, monstrous proposal to address the country’s demographic crisis. Under the innocuously named Plan 75, senior citizens are gently encouraged to sign up for a voluntary euthanasia program.

Chie Hayakawa’s “Plan 75” puts a realistic spin on the dystopian scenarios of 1970s sci-fi movies like “Soylent Green” and “Logan’s Run,” and is all the more chilling for it. When the director first depicted the conceit in a short film that featured in the 2018 speculative anthology “ Ten Years Japan ,” it made the omnibus’s other segments look benign in comparison.

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever. By subscribing, you can help us get the story right.

Plan 75 Review: Chie Hayakawa Creates A Quietly Subversive Future Dystopia [TIFF]

Plan 75

What is the cost of living?

This question is at the core of "Plan 75," the debut film of Japanese director Chie Hayakawa. The soft-spoken drama imagines a near-future dystopia where Japan's super-aged society  has strained the economy to a breaking point. (The country has one of the oldest populations in the world, measured by the percentage of people over the age of 65.) Hayakawa is tapping into very real fears — and not ones limited to just Japan. Here in North America, the last decade has seen rising anxiety over a " silver tsunami " from the baby boomer generation leaving the workforce, requiring health care, and drawing pensions.   

"Plan 75" unfurls like an extended thought experiment: What if, to deal with the "burden" of the elderly generation, the government developed a program to eliminate people over the age of 75? One that entices volunteers through messaging about "duty" and a substantial financial reward? This would, theoretically, allow citizens to choose their deaths — getting "control" over the inevitable, as one commercial puts it — in order to opt-out of draining society's resources via euthanasia. 

In "Plan 75," the imagined culture in this future Japan has turned against the elderly, with young people even committing violent age-motivated hate crimes. In response to the rising crisis, the Japanese government creates the Plan 75 program, inviting citizens over the age of 75 to sacrifice themselves for the greater good. This is addressing a very real concern presented by demographers and economists, but Hayakawa is presenting a subtle subversion: Taken to an extreme, these age-related fears focus on vilifying the elderly for not fitting into the existing system rather than imagining ways to accommodate this generation. 

The future looks bleak

There's an ensemble cast with interwoven stories in "Plan 75," which explores the concept of euthanasia as well as themes of aging, sacrifice, and personal responsibility. Do the elderly have an obligation to end their own lives to lessen the burden on younger generations? Is this really an ethical choice? Does someone who is vulnerable (i.e homeless or depressed) even have the capacity to choose their own death — especially when being manipulated, or at least persuaded, by propaganda and a cash reward? 

"Plan 75" is quietly devastating. It presents the elderly as a forgotten generation, left to fend for themselves in an increasingly unwelcoming world. The plight of senior citizens is represented by the experiences of hotel housekeeper Michi (Chieko Baisho); she has no family to care for her, no husband, and few friends for companionship — friends who, because of their age, could (and do) die suddenly and without warning. Michi and the other elderly housekeepers are sweet, friendly, and likable people, and it is absolutely heartbreaking to watch such vibrant women casually discussing what is essentially joint suicide. 

The problems presented in "Plan 75" are, in many ways, not really problems at all — and that's a key element of Hayakawa's overall message. Michi is capable of working, despite being 78 years of age. She loses her job because of ageism-motivated forced retirement, not because her work was not satisfactory. Maria (Stefanie Arianne) works in adult care but takes a job with the Plan 75 program because it pays better. The government has the budget for marketing, salaries, and facilities — could that money not be spent on developing social assistance programs where people like Michi and her elderly companions could help take care of each other? The casually cruel messaging of the Plan 75 program seems to be that it wouldn't be "worth it" — the elderly are past their "best before" date, and society is better off without them.

Past their best-before date?

Hiromi (Isomura Hayato) has the most interesting journey in "Plan 75," going from a representative selling the solution to a disillusioned critic. Slowly and gradually, adults in the younger generation — represented by Maria, Hiromi, and Yoko (Kawai Yuumi), who all work for Plan 75 — recognize their own culpability for the current situation. Elders like Michi and Yukio (Takao Taka) aren't faceless parasites stealing the future — they are human beings. They are lonely, isolated people who want to love and deserve to be loved. Their lives, regardless of their ability to produce for a capitalist society, have inherent value.

"Plan 75" invites the audience to contemplate the story's themes and ideas; there is no preaching to or patronizing the viewer. Hayakawa takes a harrowing, prescient story and injects some much-needed optimism, all without ever succumbing to saccharine sentimentality. Great care is made to make this world as relatable and believable as possible; this could be tomorrow. It could even be today. What's important, however, is that this kind of government-sanctioned mass murder is not inevitable. This is not a story about despair — it's one that inspires hope and, if we're lucky, change.

/Film rating: 8 out of 10

  • Work & Careers
  • Life & Arts

Plan 75 film review — low-key sci-fi offers Japan’s elderly an early exit

Try unlimited access only $1 for 4 weeks.

Then $75 per month. Complete digital access to quality FT journalism on any device. Cancel anytime during your trial.

  • Global news & analysis
  • Expert opinion
  • Special features
  • FirstFT newsletter
  • Videos & Podcasts
  • Android & iOS app
  • FT Edit app
  • 10 gift articles per month

Explore more offers.

Standard digital.

  • FT Digital Edition

Premium Digital

Print + premium digital, ft professional, weekend print + standard digital, weekend print + premium digital.

Essential digital access to quality FT journalism on any device. Pay a year upfront and save 20%.

  • Global news & analysis
  • Exclusive FT analysis
  • FT App on Android & iOS
  • FirstFT: the day's biggest stories
  • 20+ curated newsletters
  • Follow topics & set alerts with myFT
  • FT Videos & Podcasts
  • 20 monthly gift articles to share
  • Lex: FT's flagship investment column
  • 15+ Premium newsletters by leading experts
  • FT Digital Edition: our digitised print edition
  • Weekday Print Edition
  • Videos & Podcasts
  • Premium newsletters
  • 10 additional gift articles per month
  • FT Weekend Print delivery
  • Everything in Standard Digital
  • Everything in Premium Digital

Complete digital access to quality FT journalism with expert analysis from industry leaders. Pay a year upfront and save 20%.

  • 10 monthly gift articles to share
  • Everything in Print
  • Make and share highlights
  • FT Workspace
  • Markets data widget
  • Subscription Manager
  • Workflow integrations
  • Occasional readers go free
  • Volume discount

Terms & Conditions apply

Explore our full range of subscriptions.

Why the ft.

See why over a million readers pay to read the Financial Times.

International Edition

Plan 75: sombre euthanasia movie captures the escalating anxieties around ageing

Hayakawa Chie’s dystopian debut about an opt-in euthanasia scheme for the elderly is less an argument about the merits and ills of the practice than a searing interrogation of how capitalism has made it too expensive to grow old with dignity.

Plan 75 (2022)

Sign up for Sight and Sound’s Weekly Film Bulletin and more

News, reviews and archive features every Friday, and information about our latest magazine once a month.

With Plan 75, director Hayakawa Chie begins her feature film career by posing a moral question about the end of life. In her imagining, the Japanese government, following a spate of hate crimes against the elderly, introduces an opt-in-euthanasia scheme, ‘Plan 75’, for those aged 75 and above. 

Hayakawa’s remarkably muted way of rendering brutality, dissent and the devastating chasm between generations is apparent from the outset. A massacre at a care home for the elderly is suggested by a blood-splattered gun and the rotating wheel of a fallen wheelchair. Plan 75 is executed by young and middle-aged civil servants with breezy nonchalance and bureaucratic efficiency; colourless gas sends the initiative’s participants gently into that good night. Even the one act of resistance to the plan is represented in the most understated way: we see only the impact of brown liquid on a poster, thrown by someone offscreen.

Hayakawa’s quietly realist treatment of the dystopian premise makes for haunting viewing. The mellow dialogue and casual pacing suggest an absence of conflict. But it is precisely the ordinariness of Plan 75’s visual scheme that pricks the viewer’s conscience: it is disconcertingly easy to imagine the plan being implemented in many countries with ageing populations.

The sombre, noirish sensibilities of cinematographer Urata Hideho – who previously shot the darkly incisive, Golden Leopard-winning Singaporean film A Land Imagined (2018) – help convey the sense that not all may be well. Unease can be detected in the glance two Plan 75 participants give each other on their deathbeds; in a shared car ride between two recently reconciled relatives; in the lonely glare of a small, dimly lit apartment.

At first glance, Plan 75’s inductees are willing parties. Hayakawa’s exposition-heavy first half shows us how participants are provided with a 24/7 chatline, afterlife arrangements and a ¥100,000 reward. But as we become acquainted with the rich inner lives of two characters in particular, Michi (Baishō Chieko) and Yukio (Takao Taka), we learn that they have less agency over their decisions than one might imagine.

Baishō Chieko as Michi in Plan 75 (2022)

It becomes clear that ageing with dignity is not just an ethical question but an economic one. Indeed, Hayakawa’s stirring film is less an argument about the merits and ills of euthanasia than a searing interrogation of how capitalism has made it too expensive to grow old with dignity. As housing precarity, unemployment and unwieldy application processes for pension schemes chisel away at the characters’ self-esteem, the movie makes it clear that in a neoliberal schema, the elderly are simply a hindrance to Japan’s financial growth and technological progress. The initiative of the title embodies a telling inconsistency in the government’s approach to elder care: for all the plan’s talk of the dignity of death, scant effort or resources are put towards enabling a dignified life.

The bulk of the work of caring for the geriatric population in the film has fallen on the shoulders of migrant workers like Maria (Stefanie Arianne), from the Philippines – an example of how ‘unwanted’ jobs in countries like Japan have propped up booming remittance economies in other parts of Asia. We first see Maria working at an elderly care home, but she is hard-pressed for money: her daughter has a heart disease and requires surgery. An acquaintance tips Maria off about a better-paying job with Plan 75, which involves sorting the belongings of the deceased. Maria witnesses a colleague pocketing valuable items, and is encouraged by this colleague to do the same. Even in death, society is set up to wrest every last cent of value from a person’s life.

Maria is cheered on by her community as she fights for every dollar to nurse her young but sick daughter back to health – yet society barely flinches at Plan 75, which pushes many healthy elderly people to choose euthanasia in the name of national duty and self-sacrifice. At one point, Maria falls asleep at work, and a vision of an old person lying on a hospital bed gives way to an image of a young girl sitting by a window. It’s the visual equivalent of a rhetorical question: is the sanctity of life contingent on one’s age?

Plan 75 expresses the escalating anxieties about one’s silver years in Japan, which has one of the world’s most rapidly ageing populations. But the film’s exploration of life’s sacredness, and its tender portrait of elderly relationships, transcend cultural specificities; it’s a resonant lesson in humanism.

► Plan 75  arrives in UK cinemas from May 12. 

an image, when javascript is unavailable

The Definitive Voice of Entertainment News

Subscribe for full access to The Hollywood Reporter

site categories

Cannes hidden gem: speculative sci-fi gets the social realist treatment in ‘plan 75’.

Shocked by a dwindling sense of empathy in her native Japan, director Chie Hayakawa imagines a trenchant scenario in which the government coaxes the elderly into voluntary euthanasia to address the country's aging population.

By Patrick Brzeski

Patrick Brzeski

Asia Bureau Chief

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share to Flipboard
  • Send an Email
  • Show additional share options
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Share on Pinterest
  • Share on Reddit
  • Share on Tumblr
  • Share on Whats App
  • Print the Article
  • Post a Comment

'Plan 75' still

When Japanese filmmaker Chie Hayakawa returned to Tokyo in 2008 after 10 years of living in New York, she saw her home country through fresh eyes — and it wasn’t what she remembered.

“I was surprised by how intolerant Japan had become,” she says. “There was this new idea of ‘self-responsibility’ that was being talked about everywhere, and the implication seemed to be that the marginalized should find a way to fend for themselves.”

Then, in 2016, one of the worst crimes in Japanese modern history occurred: A 26-year-old man went on a stabbing spree in a care facility for the disabled north of Tokyo, killing 19 and severely injuring 26 others. The killer justified his actions with a shocking string of statements, arguing for a world where the severely disabled could be euthanized to “ease the burden” on their families and society at large.

Related Stories

Edinburgh film festival unveils full lineup led by saoirse ronan's 'the outrun', prince harry, hugh grant set for itv documentary on phone hacking scandal 'tabloids on trial'.

“I was enraged and thought, if Japan were to accelerate down this path of intolerance, what would it look like?” Hayakawa says. Her conclusion was  Plan 75.

Hayakawa’s debut feature, expanded from a 2018 short, imagines a future Japan in which the government has introduced a policy offering all citizens above the age of 75 with an all-expenses-paid voluntary euthanasia service. The program is aggressively marketed to Japan’s elderly as a responsible way to ensure that they don’t become a burden on those around them, and instead help the country address its economically disadvantageous demographics. (Japan is by far the world’s oldest nation, with more than 29 percent of the population 65 or older, compared with 17 percent in the U.S. Facing spiraling budget deficits, the government recently introduced policies to encourage delayed retirement and to trim the country’s relatively generous social safety net.)

Hayakawa says she interviewed 15 elderly Japanese women of various background as research during the film’s development. All of them told her that if a program like Plan 75 existed, they would probably consider it, “because they don’t want to be a burden.”

“In Japanese culture, we are so bound by this idea that you should not trouble other people and that doing so is very inappropriate and shameful,” Hayakawa says. “It makes it almost impossible for us to ask for help,” she adds. “Ultimately, I wanted this film to wake the audience up and remind them to have empathy.”

Unlike much speculative fiction,  Plan 75  doesn’t take its concept to absurdist lengths or employ a heightened sci-fi aesthetic. Instead, it unfolds in a frank, social realist style, the impact deepened by how entirely plausible its finely detailed scenarios are.

“People tend to expect the film to be a futuristic sci-fi, but I felt it would be more effective to help the audience imagine that this society is just an extension of our real world today,” she says.

Plan 75  follows an elegant, elderly woman (Chieko Baishô) as her options gradually dwindle: Unlucky in marriage and childless, she has no immediate family to spend time with; her dearest friend passes away abruptly; decent work at her age becomes harder and harder to come by, pushing self-sufficiency out of grasp. Increasingly, society seems to be telling her that Plan 75 is the only sensible option — especially once she meets the cheerful young staff who are there to talk her through the policy’s sales spiel (participants are given a cash payout to settle their final affairs) and onboard her into the program (regular check-in calls, just to chat, help ensure patients don’t have any second thoughts).

Plan 75 ‘s young recruitment agent is played by the handsome and personable young Japanese actor Hayato Isomura. “I wanted somebody who has this kind face and gentle demeanor as he goes about his job — and yet, what he’s actually doing is recommending people to die,” Hayakawa explains. “It begins as ironical, but becomes more tragic as he awakens to what he’s doing.”

Ultimately,  Plan 75 also explores what it means to affirm life when so much of it has been stripped away. “I wanted to show that finding the beauty to live is not something that can be explained in the rational, logical way of economic policy,” Hayakawa says. “Instead, I tried to give it cinematic expression.”

THR Newsletters

Sign up for THR news straight to your inbox every day

More from The Hollywood Reporter

Elliot page stars as trans man facing a challenging reunion in ‘close to you’ trailer, ‘watchmen chapter 1’ trailer introduces matthew rhys, katee sackhoff as animated dc heroes, ‘longlegs’ director osgood perkins explains why he doesn’t watch contemporary horror, zoë kravitz in talks to join austin butler in darren aronofsky’s ‘caught stealing’, ‘kalki 2898 ad’ review: telugu-language sci-fi epic is fitfully entertaining overkill, ‘awards chatter’ live: clive owen on career highlights, james bond and tv shows ‘monsieur spade’ and ‘a murder at the end of the world’.

Quantcast

Little White Lies home

  • Join Club LWLies
  • Get the Mag
  • Open search
  • Membership: Support our independent journalism
  • Podcast: Listen and Subscribe
  • YouTube: Watch our latest video essays

Review by Trevor Johnston

plan 75 movie reviews

Directed by

Chie Hayakawa

Chieko Baishô Hayato Isomura Stefanie Arianne

Anticipation.

It does sound like it could almost be real, which lends this speculative drama genuine intrigue.

Involving and understated, though it tails off towards the end.

In Retrospect.

A film of haunting unease, but not perhaps the complete package.

Chie Hayakawa’s dystopian drama about a government-sponsored euthanasia programme is affecting, but leaves key questions unexplored.

A s ’70s Hollywood sci-fi spectaculars Soylent Green and Logan’s Run suggested, the very idea that a society might deal with its population challenges by eliminating the elderly could only really be dramatically workable in a far-off future dystopia. Meanwhile in the real world, as of 2023, we find the Japanese government publicly admitting it’s facing a looming economic crisis, given the huge percentage of old people living longer and needing care, and the smaller portion of taxpayers picking up the tab for it all.

The Tokyo authorities have just announced a scheme to increase the birth-rate by providing financial inducements for starting a family, but perhaps they could just as easily have opted for Plan 75, the national euthanasia programme laid out in this worryingly convincing drama.

The film’s soothing public information campaign makes it all sound so straightforward and sensible. Removing the existing ban on assisted dying, the authorities can now allow all over-seventy-fives to take the stress and guesswork out of their twilight years by signing up to painlessly end it all in purpose-built facilities. All for free, and with a modest payment provided so you could treat yourself to, say, a deluxe sushi set before you depart. The poster graphics cheerily include a little smile motif, and there’s also the farewell photo, expressed in English – because if you want to sell anything in Japan, an English-language catchphrase is the way to go.

So far, so ookily persuasive, and the first hour of Chie Hayakawa’s film certainly casts a gentle, deliberately-paced spell, as we get to know a gang of old girls with varying attitudes towards the Plan, especially Chieko Basho’s fiercely independent type, who is essentially forced into signing up due to her straitened financial circumstances and lack of family ties.

Which gets us to the movie’s most touching moments, as she strikes up a supportive friendship with the teleworker assigned to keep her on-message, and who tearfully reminds her that she does indeed have the right to opt out at any moment. As the story construction’s ensemble approach broadens out, you get the sense Hayakawa really wanted to make a film about the possible bonds between the generations providing an evident antidote to society’s seeming willingness to throw seniors on the scrapheap.

It’s subtly affecting, as far as it goes, but its sorta sci-fi bliss-out leaves some key questions exasperatingly unexplored. There’s no place here for the stricken and ailing who might find Plan 75 a merciful release, for example, nor indeed does the material ever get to grip with the Japan-specific suffocating groupthink which presents a self-sacrificing injection as a glorious contribution to the nation’s future prosperity.

Quietly determined to stand up for the individual’s right to choose, and to eschew high-concept grandstanding, the film’s thoroughgoing understatement has a lot going for it, but allows credibility to slacken noticeably in the third act, leaving us too rather much room to contemplate its sins of omission.

Little White Lies is committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them.

By becoming a member you can support our independent journalism and receive exclusive essays, prints, monthly film recommendations and more.

Published 11 May 2023

Tags: Chie Hayakawa Plan 75

Most Popular

plan 75 movie reviews

LWLies 102: the Challengers issue – Out now!

plan 75 movie reviews

Kinds of Kindness – first-look review

plan 75 movie reviews

Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga review – Miller you absolute mad man

plan 75 movie reviews

Alice Rohrwacher: ‘The past must be a living thing’

plan 75 movie reviews

  • Become a Member
  • Digital Editions
  • Write for LWLies
  • Access Information
  • Privacy Policy
  • The Scoring System

What are you looking for?

Little White Lies Logo

About Little White Lies

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

  • David Jenkins
  • Hannah Strong
  • Marina Ashioti
  • Laurène Boglio

plan 75 movie reviews

Latest Posts

plan 75 movie reviews

A Conversation with Sebastien Vaniček (INFESTED)

plan 75 movie reviews

A Conversation with Nesa Azimi (DRIVER)

Werner Herzog in Les Blank's BURDEN OF DREAMS

BURDEN OF DREAMS Restoration Trailer: Les Blank’s BTS Look of Werner Herzog’s ‘Fitzcarraldo’ Gets the 4K Treatment

plan 75 movie reviews

A Conversation with Elizabeth Sankey (WITCHES)

logo

(Check out Jack Schenker’s movie review of  Plan 75,  it’s in theaters now. Seen it? Join the conversation with HtN on our  Letterboxd Page .)

The new Japanese arthouse gem  Plan 75 sucks you into its dystopian world with a fascinating premise: citizens over 75 may opt into government funded euthanasia in exchange for $1,000. Director Chie Hayakawa ( who I also interviewed ) has created an extremely precise and sterile film about societal chaos. The film’s tone mixes an alien atmosphere with sadness and splashes of humor. Plan 75  grips you with its emotional intelligence, thematic depth and relatable characters. The film’s premise on its own could spark hours of conversation amongst friends, but Chie Hayakawa takes it a step further, delivering a beautiful human drama amidst an unfamiliar land.

The film follows Michi (Chieko Baisho) as she navigates a Japanese society that encourages people over 75 to volunteer for euthanasia under a newly implemented law. While a lot of the film’s runtime is spent with Michi, there are supporting characters that give us necessary perspective, such as Maria (Stefanie Arianne) who plays a worker at Plan 75. Michi goes through her mundane routines in life, and through a series of off-putting advertisements, she decides to take up the Plan 75 offer. The process takes some time which leaves the audience to contemplate what they would do in Michi’s shoes.

Hayakawa’s filmic influences are mysteriously unclear. The only slight comparison could be made to the films of Michael Haneke, a director who made a name for being holistically unique. That is quite the achievement for debut writer and director Chie Hayakawa. In her first film she solidified her voice in the industry and created a piece of cinema that feels different from most of the modern landscape. One moment that has stuck in my mind comes at around the 44 minute mark. Michi has just had a conversation with a worker over at Plan 75. She is trying to make a human connection with the worker and the conversation turns cold. It cuts to Michi, late at night, alone working as a traffic guide for large trucks. As the scene begins you are immediately struck by this brilliant location and lighting. From there the diegetic sounds of the trucks going by and the cold late night wind washes away in exchange for melancholy electronic chords. This scene has no consequence in terms of the plot, however, it is moments like these that are strangely disturbing and allow the film to breathe. It is masterfully executed lyrical cinema.

Plan 75  is certain to grab the attention of cinephiles through its precise craft. This is a film that, despite its quiet nature, has been tailored for the theater via an intricately designed sound. If you are to view the film on a laptop, be sure to use headphones as to not miss one of the best sound designs of the year. It is the ordinary sounds in the film that hold great importance in creating a world the audience can get lost in. This combined with the cinematography and dense score is what gives this film its alien feeling. The film is brought back down to earth by a subtle yet emotionally complicated performance from Chieko Baisho. She does not speak very often in the film, and must deliver the crux of her emotion through her expressions. She nails the character of Michi and keeps the film from ever feeling too distant. Not only is  Plan 75  a must see for aspiring filmmakers and cinephiles, Chie Hayakawa is a serious talent to look out for.

– Jack Schenker ( @YUNGOCUPOTIS )

KimStim; Chie Hayakawa; Plan 75 movie review

Become a patron at Patreon!

Jack Schenker

Jack Schenker is based in Los Angeles, CA. He has worked in the film industry for 5 years at various companies including Mighty Engine, Film Hub, and Grandview. Jack continues to write for Hammer to Nail , conducting interviews with prominent industry members including Steve James, Riley Keough, Christian Petzold, and Ira Sachs. His dream is to one day write and direct a horror film based on the work of Nicolas Winding Refn and Dario Argento. He directed his first short film this year titled Profondo . Jack's favorite filmmakers include Werner Herzog, Wim Wenders, Denis Villeneuve, Bong Joon Ho, David Lean, John Carpenter, Ari Aster, Jordan Peele, and Robert Altman to name a few. Look out for Jack on Twitter (aka X) . You can see the extent of Jack's film knowledge on Letterboxd , where he has written over 1000 reviews and logged over 1600 films.

Post a Comment

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Related Posts

plan 75 movie reviews

A Conversation with Ilker Çatak (THE TEACHERS’ LOUNGE)

plan 75 movie reviews

A Conversation with Ira Sachs (PASSAGES)

Website branding logos

Powered by WeatherAPI.com

plan 75 movie reviews

What To Do With Old Things: a review of ‘Plan 75’

Wanggo Gallaga

  • December 6, 2022

Absolutely quiet and still, ‘ Plan 75 ’ is a chilling look into a dystopian world where Japan has found a startling way to handle its growing elderly population: a government program that offers assisted suicide to all citizens aged 75 and above. The program itself, the titular Plan 75, offers a cash handout for the volunteers to do with as they please and are assisted all the way through cremation services to make everything easy and tidy. By all means, this film falls under the realm of science fiction but first-time feature film director Chie Hayakawa is not interested in the macro view of this imagined bleak future. Instead, she focuses her camera on three characters: at its center is Michi (played by the arresting Chieko Baisho), a 78-year-old woman with no family, who is struggling to keep her independence in a society that sees no value in someone of her age; Himoru Okabe (played by Hayato Isomura), a sales agent for Plan 75, who truly believes in the cause until he meets an estranged aged family member who signs up for the program; and rounding out the cast is Maria (played by Stefanie Arianne), a Filipina caregiver, who is working in Japan to pay for her daughter’s expensive life-saving surgery, who accepts work from Plan 75.

As a film, ‘Plan 75’ is a character study. The film’s central premise pushes these three characters towards their own crisis of faith and in the process, we watch as this world normalizes death and the discarding of anything that is no longer deemed as valuable. Hayakawa, who co-wrote the screenplay with Jason Gray, covers this deterioration of society with almost no fanfare, as if this was ordinary and normal and it’s a chilling reminder of how bureaucracy and keeping the status quo seems more important on a larger scale for civilizations than the slow degradation of our humanity. 

plan 75 movie reviews

‘Plan 75’ poses its questions and arguments through Michi, Himoru, and Maria. The film is never loud with its objections or statements. We are invested in Michi’s desire to remain “useful,” At 78, she’s struggling to find work to support herself as all her friends are succumbing to old age. Without a family, she is completely on her own and society is pushing her towards volunteering for Plan 75 as there are no opportunities available for her to keep on living.

This is all done without drama, without highlighting the emotions involved. It’s a quiet film that basks in the silences of heavy thought and meditation. Even when Himoru wavers from his own convictions and takes a more personal approach to assisting his uncle with his plans, the film never judges him nor pities him. It is what it is. When Maria discovers, through her work in the Plan 75 facility, what happens to the things left behind by the seniors who have passed on, the film never underlines the sadness or the horror of the insights that are gleaned from this. 

plan 75 movie reviews

What the film manages to do is show us how society and the world is slowly just accepting these questionable changes happening around us. How, in the name of efficiency and the common good, we are allowing people to be left behind and pushed away in favour of those who can contribute more. There’s a hierarchy that is proposed in this film that mirrors what’s happening in real life and ‘Plan 75’ manages to highlight the impact this can have on the people intrinsically linked to it.

plan 75 movie reviews

This is not an easy film to watch but it is an important one. It skillfully manages to ask important questions over a hypothetical situation and by putting front and center Michi, an elderly woman with no family, no one to vouch for her or fight for her and defend her, the film asks us to make a decision about her. While Hayakawa manages a burst of hope, a moment of urgency at the film’s third act, it still leaves the final verdict to us. Are we as powerless as Maria, victims of our own circumstances or will we have a crisis of conviction such as Himoru, or will we have the strength to stand up against the forces that dictate our worth? 

This is not an easy film to watch but you have to watch it.

My Rating :

— Plan 75   opens in cinemas nationwide on December 7. Buy your tickets  here .

Related Content

plan 75 movie reviews

Share the story

  • Movie Reviews , Plan 75 , Reviews

Recent Posts

plan 75 movie reviews

Swipe for July: 6 Best Deals on Coffee, Gifts, & Treats on The SM Malls Online App!

plan 75 movie reviews

New Movies This Week: ‘Fly Me to the Moon,’ ‘That Kind of Love,’ and more!

plan 75 movie reviews

MOVIE REVIEW: The Funny Thing About Truth and Lies: A Review of ‘Fly Me to the Moon’

Hot off the press.

plan 75 movie reviews

Felip Releases 7sins Album, To hold concert on Jul 27, 2024

plan 75 movie reviews

The Leading Women in Philippine Musical Theater Are Triple Threats

plan 75 movie reviews

Future-Proof Your Filipino Home: The Ultimate Guide to Affordable Solar Power

Ayala Malls Cinemas logo

  • My ClickTheCity
  • Tickets FAQ
  • Update Account

Popular Malls

  • Robinsons Galleria South
  • SM Aura Premier
  • SM Mall of Asia
  • SM North EDSA

Popular Theaters

  • SM City Dasmariñas
  • SM City Iloilo
  • SM City Pampanga
  • SM City Baguio

Popular Shops & Services

  • Power Mac Center
  • Octagon Computer Store
  • Globe Telecom

Popular in Food & Drink

  • DEC Diao Eng Chay
  • Pasteleria Costa Brava
  • Salcedo Village, Makati
  • BF Homes, Paranaque
  • Taft, Manila
  • Little Baguio, San Juan
  • Tomas Morato, Quezon City
  • Legaspi Village, Makati
  • Malate, Manila
  • Bonifacio High Street, Taguig
  • Connecticut, San Juan
  • Ortigas Center, Pasig

The Plan to Take Down All For One in MHA Season 7, Explained

4

Your changes have been saved

Email Is sent

Please verify your email address.

You’ve reached your account maximum for followed topics.

CBR Anime Week is brought to you by HULU ANIMAYHEM

Hulu Animayhem

The following contains spoilers for Season 7 of My Hero Academia .

For several seasons now, the heroes of My Hero Academia have tried in vain to find and defeat the supervillain known as All For One , the symbol of evil. Years ago, All Might defeated him in battle to protect this era of peace, but that victory was only temporary. All Might had to face All For One in Kamino Ward to save Katsuki Bakugo, and then All For One broke out of Tartarus to continue his campaign of villainy yet again.

For a time, All For One seemed untouchable, staying two steps ahead of the pro-heroes with his army of minions, his sinister schemes, and his collection of powerful Quirks. Now, with the final war against villainy reaching its climax in the My Hero Academia anime, the heroes have no choice but to gather their remaining strength and fight All For One, no matter the gruesome risks. All is on the line, so the pro heroes made sure to devise the perfect plan to get the edge on the symbol of evil as My Hero Academia 's 7th season continues . The plan is a desperate one, but also a brilliant one.

split image of All For One, Deku, and Stain

10 Times Deku Ignored Advice & Almost Got Killed

Deku's genuine desire to save others in MHA triumphed over his better judgment every time he chanced upon someone who needed protection.

Yuga Aoyama's Betrayal Is the Key to Fooling All For One

Yuga aoyama's parents struck a deal with all for one.

The never-ending war against villainy is a struggle not just of Quirks vs Quirks, but also a battle of wits, investigation, strategic planning, and even the power of trust and friendship. Fighting the League of Villains and the Paranormal Liberation Front calls for unity and smarts, and unfortunately for the heroes, All For One excels in those arenas. He has the utter loyalty of his minions and is famously smart, a mastermind schemer who nearly had Japan in his grasp and may seize that nation once again.

All For One also wisely used his Quirk of the same name to cultivate countless followers who owe him everything for giving them the Quirks they want, and that even includes Yuga Aoyama, UA's traitor . In past decades, All For One convinced a legion of people to follow him as he redistributed Quirks, and the same is true even today. Yuga Aoyama was born Quirkless, so his desperate parents turned to the symbol of evil and struck a deal to get their son a Quirk. Hence, Yuga obtained Navel Laser, and he and his parents became reluctant tools of All For One.

The Symbol of evil held Mr. and Mrs. Aoyama hostage, pressuring Yuga to obey him and serve as a double agent hiding in plain sight at UA. Yuga despaired at the situation, but he loved and cared for his parents and thus obeyed the symbol of evil, even if it tore him apart on the inside. That's why Yuga helped the League of Villains attack the USJ complex and the forest training camp, and now, All For One expects Yuga to provide inside aid once again.

My Hero Academia' Deku and Toga

Why This MHA Villain is Actually a Great Love Interest for Deku

My Hero Academia has been pretty low on the romance end, but there is a villain who could have been a great love interest for our favorite nerd.

Yuga may view himself as a villain who was doomed to failure for being born Quirkless , but his classmates see things differently. Izuku Midoriya and the others were certainly shocked at Yuga's betrayal, but they did not condemn him. After some interrogations of the Aoyama family, class 1-A and the UA teachers decided on a more constructive and forgiving course of action. Instead of imprisoning Yuga and punishing him, they decided to turn the tables on All For One in time for this final battle.

Yuga is the middle ground between the Paranormal Liberation Front and the heroes' side, and so far, that link has gone in one direction. Now, the heroes and Yuga will take a serious risk and use that link in the reverse direction. Thus, Yuga and the heroes will take advantage of All For One's total trust in Yuga Aoyama, which is a curious reversal of shonen anime's usual narratives. It's typical for villains to exploit the bonds of love, trust, and friendship to manipulate and pressure those heroes, such as taking someone's family hostage.

Such bonds can be a liability for the heroes, while villains care only about themselves and are rarely vulnerable to this tactic. But now, All For One is vulnerable in exactly that way, since he puts his full trust in Yuga Aoyama to serve him faithfully. AFO even has a lie detection Quirk for good measure, but the pro heroes find a way around that, allowing Yuga to lie to AFO over the phone. Yuga's deceitful phone call with All For One, combined with some acting between Yuga and Deku, fooled the symbol of evil into thinking that Yuga was once again selling out the heroes.

Fans wouldn't call it the power of friendship between Yuga and AFO, but those bonds of trust still turned against AFO, and the heroes must capitalize on it right away. This trick won't work twice on All For One, but at this point in the war, there are no second chances remaining anyway. So, All For One used a sludgy teleportation Quirk to bring himself and his chosen minions to Yuga, and for a moment, All For One felt confident in his plan as he saw Izuku panicking at Yuga's betrayal. But it was All For One who was betrayed, and then the pro-heroes and UA students arrived in force. This is how Yuga will redeem himself and make amends for his betrayal, and so far, it's working.

My Hero Academia' All Might and Deku

My Hero Academia's Next Symbol of Peace Shouldn't Be Deku

My Hero Academia is drawing to a close and there is now the question of the next Symbol of Peace, but it definitely shouldn't be Deku.

The Pro Heroes Divide and Conquer Their Enemies

The plan is to prevent another jaku general hospital bloodbath.

Hawks attacks All For One in the sky.

The united pro heroes and UA students tried to fight the Paranormal Liberation Front in a massive clash of army vs army back in My Hero Academia 's 6th season , but the results were mixed at best. Plenty of villains were captured, but many pro heroes got themselves badly injured or even killed, and some gave up their careers in despair after that battle. The pro heroes know they can't afford to retry that strategy, so the plan against All For One is to divide and conquer.

It may be risky for the heroes to divide their limited numbers, but it's still a better strategy than repeating the bloodbath of Jaku General Hospital. At the very least, this means All For One won't get a chance to pick off weaker heroes and students in a traditional battle, because only the best heroes will fight the symbol of evil in this divide and conquer approach.

All For One brought his best minions to the battlefield when he arrived via that sludgy teleportation Quirk, and it's clear that AFO wanted to fight one last decisive battle with his minions by his side and overwhelm Deku. To All For One's surprise, the pro heroes did something similar with Kurogiri's Warp Gate Quirk, leveling out the playing field in a hurry. At first, it was just Deku and Yuga on the field of battle, easy prey for All For One's side, but that was just a ruse to make AFO lower his guard. He had no reason to expect Kurogiri's Warp Gate Quirk to be used by the heroes' side, and yet it happened.

Dabi, Deku, and All-Might

The Dark Side of Hero Society in My Hero Academia

All is not well with hero society in My Hero Academia, with deep cracks in its foundation and rot at its core.

Kurogiri has since been partially redeemed as a character, no longer being Tomura Shigaraki's personal chauffeur with his Quirk. Kurogiri was once Oboro Shirakumo, Aizawa's and Present Mic's friend, who has since been turned into an undead Nomu. There's probably no way to restore Shirakumo's humanity, but he can at least do this much. In fact, he's not even doing it in person — he's just providing the template for that Quirk while Neito Monoma of class 1-B is doing the heavy lifting.

That shows how far Neito has come, from being class 1-B's cartoonish bully to a brave hero using his Copy Quirk in incredible ways for the benefit of all. Neito didn't just use Copy to help the heroes arrive at the field of battle, either. This Quirk is also being used in the opposite way to rearrange this battle against All For One, which is a key part of the plan. After the heroes arrived, Neito opened more Warp Gates that led to several different locations across Japan, including an offshore island far removed from the main battle.

The heroes droppeed heavy-duty metal containers to trap the individual villains, then used great force to push those villains into the Warp Gates, scattering them across the nation, unable to aid one another. A few pro heroes and UA students went after each one, with Hawks and Endeavor electing to pursue All For One as the top two heroes.

While Deku is expected to fight the supervillain Tomura Shigaraki in a specially prepared combat arena, Endeavor and Hawks can hold off All For One in their own battle, though the battle is a rough one so far, as one might expect. It's not yet clear how or even if Hawks and Endeavor will properly defeat the symbol of evil, but if Deku can defeat Tomura Shigaraki on schedule, then he may arrive at the AFO battle and finish off the symbol of evil if need be.

Deku and all of Class 2-A ready for battle on the My Hero Academia Poster

My Hero Academia

A superhero-admiring boy enrolls in a prestigious hero academy and learns what it really means to be a hero, after the strongest superhero grants him his own powers.

My Hero Academia

Thelma review: "A smart senior thriller with shades of Little Miss Sunshine"

June Squibb in Thelma (2024)

GamesRadar+ Verdict

June Squibb’s warm but wily gran-with-a-plan turns this elder-scam revenge spree into a winning comedy.

Why you can trust GamesRadar+ Our experts review games, movies and tech over countless hours, so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about our reviews policy.

Good things come to those who wait. Few have waited as long, however, as June Squibb ( Inside Out 2 ), a pistol-packing first-time leading lady in her early 90s. The Nebraska (2013) Oscar nominee is the motor driving this wildly charming revenge-com. 

Squibb's Thelma is a sweet but stubborn LA oldster scammed out of $10,000 by a fake caller requesting bail for her grandson Danny. Suddenly, she’s on a runaway vengeance spree, with pensioner pal Ben (a deadpan Richard Roundtree in a worthy last role for the Shaft star) reluctantly riding shotgun when she hijacks his two-seater disability scooter. 

First-time writer/director Josh Margolin sharpens the film into a smart senior thriller, giving us tense geriatric POVs of the challenges that ensue (Thelma is seriously old, not the agile seventy-something of The G, another recent granny-get-your-gun outing). Thus, a careering care-home scooter chase, a nail-biting furniture climb to swipe a weapon, and a thudding face-plant fall all have the feel of high-stakes Mission: Impossible action sequences (aided by Nick Chuba’s sly, Lalo-Schifrin-alike score).

There’s a warm Little Miss Sunshine feel about the bond between Thelma and Danny (The White Lotus’s Fred Hechinger) as he hares after her. But Margolin doesn’t swerve the old-age pain of losing spouses and freedom, as Ben and Thelma bond and bicker their way toward a senior showdown. Squibb’s just-right combo of cosiness and crafty determination keeps sentimentality at bay, letting the film show the everyday heroism of ageing (she did her own stunts, too, à la Cruise). So go call your granny; better still, take her to see this. 

Thelma is released in UK cinemas on July 19 and is in US theaters now. For more, check out our list of upcoming movies .

Kate is a freelance film journalist and critic. Her bylines have appeared online and in print for GamesRadar, Total Film, the BFI, Sight & Sounds, and WithGuitars.com.

Classic RPG developer that helped shape The Witcher reportedly closes as two veteran devs appear to jump ship to their own new indie studio

Zenless Zone Zero Bangboo tier list for the best helpers

The first issue of Kieron Gillen and Caspar Wijngaard's The Power Fantasy feels like an apocalyptic cross between Watchmen and Succession

Most Popular

  • 2 Still Wakes the Deep review: "A moody, ambient piece of short-form horror fiction"
  • 3 Destiny 2: The Final Shape review – "an incredibly well-executed expansion that nicely rounds off a decade-long journey"
  • 4 Nine Sols review: "Metroidvania blended with Soulslike elements and the execution is nothing short of astonishing"
  • 5 The Rogue Prince of Persia Review: "a roguelite with few fresh ideas that's mainly being propped up by its slick combat"
  • 2 Fly Me to the Moon review: "Scarlett Johansson and Channing Tatum's sassy NASA rom-com fulfils its mission to entertain"
  • 3 Longlegs review: "A little Nicolas Cage goes a long way in this deeply disconcerting experience"
  • 4 Beverly Hills Cop: Axel F review – "A return to the action thrillers of the '80s"
  • 5 Despicable Me 4 review: "Full of nostalgic value and Minion-induced hilarity"
  • 2 The Bear season 3 review: "Equal parts delicious and depressing"
  • 3 Star Wars: The Acolyte episode 5 review: "Mounting tensions come to a head in an explosive confrontation"
  • 4 Doctor Who episode 8 review: "A thrilling climax to a season that has made this 61-year-old TV show feel young again"
  • 5 Doctor Who episode 7 review: "Real potential here to make it an epic, Gatwa-worthy finale"

plan 75 movie reviews

  • For Subscribers
  • Contributor Content

plan 75 movie reviews

These are the dirtiest lakes in Oklahoma

Good morning, Oklahoma!

Here's what you need to know today:

🌞 Temperature check:  Mostly sunny with a high of 96 and a low of 73, according to AccuWeather.

📅 Today in History: In 1804, a duel between then U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton in Weehawken, New Jersey, ended with Hamilton being fatally wounded. The duel was a culmination of a longstanding hostility between the two.

News you can use 📰

  • 🍿 Entertainment reporter Brandy McDonnell has seen "Twisters." How did it stack up to the original? Here's her review.
  • 🤢 These Oklahoma lakes were ranked in top 10 ‘dirtiest’ lakes in the US
  • 🏀 Have you been following OKC Thunder in the NBA Summer League? Here are our top photos

If you only read one thing today:

A new plan to transform okc's oldest public housing complex is in the works.

Housing officials and urban designers are calling for more residential feedback as they  develop plans for an ambitious project aimed at rebuilding Oklahoma City’s oldest public housing complex  and revitalizing surrounding neighborhoods. 

Residents at Will Rogers Courts are  among the poorest in the city , with many of them making no annual income and lacking transportation. The complex was under scrutiny in late May this year after three fatal shootings occurred within six days at the location.

Read the full story here 🔗

If you like this newsletter, forward it to a friend or family member. If you were forwarded this email and want to sign up to get it in your inbox, do that here.

What is Peacock?

  • How much does it cost?
  • Is it included with Instacart?
  • Where can I sign up?

Where can I watch Peacock?

  • Is there a free plan?
  • Is Peacock streaming the Olympics?
  • What shows and movies can I watch?

Peacock streaming: Pricing, plans, and how to sign up

When you buy through our links, Business Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Peacock is the streaming home for NBCUniversal movies and shows, making it the only subscription service with access to new Universal films like "Night Swim," original series like "Apples Never Fall," and classic sitcoms like " The Office ." With a starting price of just $6 a month, it's also one of the best streaming services for budget shoppers, especially if you're a fan of NBC programs.

Ad-supported and ad-free Peacock plans are offered. Both plans give you access to Peacock's entire streaming lineup, and the ad-free tier also adds live access to your local NBC station. 

To help you decide whether Peacock is worth it, we've broken down everything you need to know about the service, including full details on pricing, plans, content, and supported devices.

plan 75 movie reviews

Peacock is a convenient streaming source for hit NBC TV shows, Universal movies, and select sports like Sunday Night Football. Prices start at just $6 a month, with additional discounts on annual plans.

Peacock is a streaming service created by NBCUniversal with two subscription plans: Premium (with ads) and Premium Plus (ad-free). The platform offers a collection of shows, movies, and original series, along with live sports and news. 

Content can be viewed via an on-demand library or always-0n streaming channels broken down by genres and franchises.

Peacock's catalog includes a mix of Universal films and NBC shows, like "Night Swim" and "Parks and Recreation." Original series and movies are also available, including hit shows like "Ted," "The Traitors," " Poker Face ," and "Twisted Metal."

For detailed impressions, you can read our full Peacock review .

How much does Peacock Premium cost?

Peacock Premium currently costs $6 a month for ad-supported streaming. Annual ad-supported plans typically cost $60, but if you sign up before June 30, you can lock in a limited-time Peacock Premium deal to get one year for just $20. To watch without ads, you need to upgrade to a Peacock Premium Plus plan, which costs $12 a month or $120 a year. 

However, Peacock is increasing its prices on July 18. On that date, new Peacock Premium subscriptions will cost $8 a month or $80 a year. Meanwhile, new Peacock Premium Plus subscriptions will cost $14 a month or $140 a year. Existing members will start paying the adjusted rates on their next billing cycle on or after August 17. With this increase, Peacock's monthly pricing will match that of Disney Plus . 

Both Peacock plans offer access to the service's entire lineup, including new original series, exclusive content from NBC shows and WWE Network, live sports like Sunday Night Football, and next-day streaming support for many NBC shows airing on TV. In addition, Peacock Premium Plus also includes download support and livestreaming access to your local NBC station. 

Do Instacart members get Peacock?

Instacart Plus members get Peacock Premium included with their membership. The grocery delivery service added Peacock Premium as a sweet extra benefit as of November 2023, meaning that members can now get free access to ad-supported streaming in addition to unlimited free delivery and more.

Where can I sign up for Peacock?

You can sign up for a Premium or Premium Plus subscription right now through the Peacock website .

Peacock's streaming app is available on all the best TVs from every major brand, as well as iOS and Android mobile devices, Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, Google TV, Fire TV, Xbox One, PlayStation, Chromecast, Xfinity, and Flex devices. Check out our guide to the best streaming devices for our top media player picks. 

The service is also available through its official website. You can browse a full list of supported devices here .

Is Peacock free?

Peacock originally offered a free entry-level plan, but that option is no longer available to new subscribers . However, members who signed up for the free plan before February 2023 can still access select content without paying for a subscription. 

Peacock's free plan has around 10,000 hours of ad-supported movies and TV shows, but you can get access to a lot more by upgrading to a Peacock Premium plan.

Peacock Premium usually costs money, but if you subscribe to Xfinity internet or TV , you might be able to get it for free. Current Xfinity Internet customers with gigabit speeds or those who are Diamond or Platinum Rewards members can get Peacock Premium for free. Likewise, Now TV customers can also get Peacock Premium for no extra charge.

Instacart Plus members also get Peacock Premium included with their subscription for free. This is a recent addition to the service, which became available to members in November 2023.

Is Peacock streaming the 2024 Olympics?

Yes, Peacock is the streaming home of the 2024 Paris Olympics. Members can watch every event live on the service, starting with the Opening Ceremony on July 26. You can learn more on Peacock's Olympics hub page .

What shows and movies are on Peacock?

Peacock Premium and Premium Plus plans both feature more than 80,000 hours worth of on-demand TV and movies. Peacock Premium Plus also lets you livestream your local NBC network. 

All paying subscribers can stream classic shows like "The Office," "Law & Order," and "Parks and Recreation." Peacock users can also access new episodes of ongoing NBC and Bravo shows the day after they air. Daily broadcasts from NBC News and MSNBC stream on Peacock as well, along with new episodes of "Days of Our Lives." 

New Universal movies also arrive on Peacock after they play in theaters. Some notable movies on Peacock right now include the Blumhouse horror flick "Night Swim." However, though new Universal films typically hit Peacock first, they only remain on the service for a few months before hitting other subscription platforms, like Prime Video . 

Outside of NBCUniversal content, Peacock has select movies and series licensed from other studios, including a rotating selection of films like "Constantine" and "Ghostbusters" from Warner Bros. and Sony. The service also has past seasons of the hit Paramount series " Yellowstone ." 

Peacock subscribers are also able to watch original shows and movies. Some popular Peacock exclusives include:

  • "Apples Never Fall"
  • "The Traitors"
  • "Twisted Metal"
  • "Based on a True Story"
  • "Hart to Heart"
  • "Poker Face"
  • "They/Them"
  • "Dr. Death"
  • "The Resort"
  • "Paul T. Goldman"
  • "One of Us Is Lying"
  • "Vampire Academy"
  • "Rutherford Falls"
  • "Would It Kill You To Laugh?"
  • "Queer as Folk"
  • "Everything I Know About Love"

Peacock has live sports, too, including Sunday Night Football during the NFL season, matches from the Premier League, Major League Baseball games, and WWE events .

plan 75 movie reviews

You can purchase logo and accolade licensing to this story here . Disclosure: Written and researched by the Insider Reviews team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our partners. We may receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising team. We welcome your feedback. Email us at [email protected] .

plan 75 movie reviews

  • Main content
  • Action/Adventure
  • Children's/Family
  • Documentary/Reality
  • Amazon Prime Video

Fun

More From Decider

Netflix Basic Plan Discontinued: Is Netflix Getting Rid Of Its Cheapest Tier?

Netflix Basic Plan Discontinued: Is Netflix Getting Rid Of Its Cheapest...

Michael Strahan Returns To 'Good Morning America' After Two Weeks Off The Air — Where He Was And Why He Was Away

Michael Strahan Returns To 'Good Morning America' After Two Weeks Off The...

'The Bachelorette' Jenn Tran Calls Out Kelly Ripa For Insisting She Can Meet A Man IRL: "Where Did You Meet Your Husband — On TV, No?" 

'The Bachelorette' Jenn Tran Calls Out Kelly Ripa For Insisting She Can...

'The Bear' Season 3 Review: Carmy Secures His Role as The Chairman of The Tortured Chefs Department

'The Bear' Season 3 Review: Carmy Secures His Role as The Chairman of The...

R.I.P. Martin Mull: 'Clue' & 'Roseanne' Star Dead at 80

R.I.P. Martin Mull: 'Clue' & 'Roseanne' Star Dead at 80

Every Kevin Costner Movie Is A Western (Even When They're Not)

Every Kevin Costner Movie Is A Western (Even When They're Not)

Nicole Kidman Tore Zac Efron’s Shirt Off in One Take, Says ‘A Family Affair’ Director: “She Does Have That Strength!”

Nicole Kidman Tore Zac Efron’s Shirt Off in One Take, Says ‘A Family...

Is Kevin Costner Dooming Himself To Be The Captain Ahab of Westerns With 'Horizon'?

Is Kevin Costner Dooming Himself To Be The Captain Ahab of Westerns With...

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)
  • Click to email a link to a friend (Opens in new window)
  • Click to copy URL

Stream It Or Skip It: ‘Wild Wild Punjab’ on Netflix, A Slapstick Hindi-Language Road Trip Movie

Four men on a bridge in Wild Wild Punjab

Where to Stream:

  • Wild Wild Punjab

Stream It Or Skip It: ‘Monkey Man’ on Peacock, Dev Patel’s Wild and Brutal Action-Revenge Epic

Stream it or skip it: ‘postcards’ on netflix, a nigerian-indian family comedy from the creator of ‘namaste wahala’, stream it or skip it: ‘heeramandi: the diamond bazaar’ on netflix, renowned indian filmmaker sanjay leela bhansali’s first crack at television, stream it or skip it: ‘amar singh chamkila’ on netflix, a biopic about the controversial punjabi singer.

Road trip movies have been around forever, whether it’s a buddy crime thriller like Thelma & Louise or a grounded drama about friendship like Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara . Which route will Netflix’s Wild Wild Punjab take?

WILD WILD PUNJAB : STREAM IT OR SKIP IT?

The Gist: After Khanna (Varun Sharma) discovers his girlfriend Vaishali has been cheating on him with their boss and is going to marry him in 2 days, his friends (Sunny Singh, Manjot Singh, and Jassie Gill) volunteer to go on a road trip with him to confront her (and crash the wedding). Along the way, they get into various hijinks, including Jain (Gill) accidentally getting married, the quad being arrested, and a shootout with drug lords.

What Will It Remind You Of?: A boys-only road trip to avenge a friend’s broken heart sounds like a spiritual successor to Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara . But for how similar it is in themes, the two films are very different in execution: Wild Wild Punjab takes a noticeably more slapstick approach to the material to a quite different level of success.

Performance Worth Watching: Manjot Singh as Honey balances the out-of-the-box humor with actual emotion the best, even if his character isn’t given a ton to do.

Memorable Dialogue: Memorable mainly because it’s repeated endlessly in the movie, “I’m over you” is the cloying mantra that drives the film’s plot forward.

Sex and Skin: The film opens with car sex and the inciting incident of the film shows the silhouette of a woman going down on a man. So, it’s safe to say that this isn’t your grandma’s Hindi cinema.

Our Take: I’m a sucker for road trip hang out movies, and even more when there’s a central premise that demands character growth and evolution. Unfortunately, Wild Wild Punjab is not that film.

The problems are many, but let’s start with the central premise. Lovelorn Khanna is dumped—after being cheated on, which is one his few sympathetic character traits—but his reaction to the change in his relationship status spirals wildly out of control. At first he’s suicidal, a trope the film leans on way too much (another character also threatens to end his life with a gun to his head over his daughter’s sham marriage). Then, Khanna’s obsession takes him across Punjab to arrive at Vaishali’s wedding just so he can tell her that he is over her. (He’s not over her.) Beyond the character motivations, the film’s timeline doesn’t make sense if you think too hard—a wedding of this magnitude couldn’t come together over two days, and the film doesn’t explain that Khanna may have lived in his delusion for much longer than he had let on.

The “wild wild” journey that the characters take isn’t exactly new territory either. After a bender, one of them wakes up married and later, the trio are jailed from a run-in with the police. These are borrowed storylines from the likes of The Hangover and other boys trip drinking movies, and the new setting doesn’t make the spin feel new.

The two women in the film are extreme caricatures. Radha, Jain’s accidental new wife, gets turned on from a billboard about pantyliners while Meera is a drug-dealing baddie with a vape addiction. Radha in particular has little to do aside from being a nuisance to Jain and a damsel in distress for Honey to rescue. Vaishali, Khanna’s former girlfriend, is one-note and played as the “villain” without any redeeming qualities. Even worse, almost every character slips up and calls her “Veshya,” which means whore. Charming. For a film set in Punjabi about Punjabi people, even the male Sikh characters are portrayed as either buffoons or criminals (or both).

Unfortunately, I found very little to like about Wild Wild Punjab . There are ways to do comedy without reducing characters to stereotypes or reusing tired plots, but unfortunately the team behind the film opted against that.

Our Call: SKIP IT. Wild Wild Punjab doesn’t strive for character growth and instead settles on misogynistic portrayals and tired ideas.

Radhika Menon ( @menonrad ) is a TV-obsessed writer based in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared on Vulture, ELLE, Teen Vogue, and more. At any given moment, she can ruminate at length over Friday Night Lights, the University of Michigan, and the perfect slice of pizza. You may call her Rad.

  • Stream It Or Skip It

Michael Strahan Returns To 'Good Morning America' After Two Weeks Off The Air — Where He Was And Why He Was Away

Michael Strahan Returns To 'Good Morning America' After Two Weeks Off The Air — Where He Was And Why He Was Away

Kelly Ripa Stunned On 'Live' After Mark Consuelos Claims They Should Start Thinking Of Their Grandparent Names: "Why, Have You Heard Something?"

Kelly Ripa Stunned On 'Live' After Mark Consuelos Claims They Should Start Thinking Of Their Grandparent Names: "Why, Have You Heard Something?"

'The View' Co-Hosts Point Fingers At EP Brian Teta When Jill Biden Asks Why They Insist On Calling Her "First Lady" 

'The View' Co-Hosts Point Fingers At EP Brian Teta When Jill Biden Asks Why They Insist On Calling Her "First Lady" 

When Does 'Power Book II: Ghost' Return With New Episodes?

When Does 'Power Book II: Ghost' Return With New Episodes?

Christina Applegate Gets Disgustingly Graphic With Deodorant Advice To 'Love Island' Stars

Christina Applegate Gets Disgustingly Graphic With Deodorant Advice To 'Love Island' Stars

Netflix Basic Plan Discontinued: Is Netflix Getting Rid Of Its Cheapest Tier?

Netflix Basic Plan Discontinued: Is Netflix Getting Rid Of Its Cheapest Tier?

plan 75 movie reviews

See product family

No featured offers available

  • Quality Price,
  • Reliable delivery option, and
  • Seller who offers good customer service

Sorry, there was a problem.

plan 75 movie reviews

Image Unavailable

Apple AirTag 4 pack

  • To view this video download Flash Player

Apple AirTag 4 pack

Brand Apple
Are Batteries Included Yes
Number of Batteries 4 CR2032 batteries required. (included)
Compatible Devices airtag
Item Weight 0.39 Ounces

About this item

  • Keep track of and find your items alongside friends and devices in the Find My app
  • Simple one-tap setup instantly connects AirTag with your iPhone or iPad
  • Play a sound on the built-in speaker to help find your things, or just ask Siri for help
  • Precision Finding with Ultra Wideband technology leads you right to your nearby AirTag (on select iPhone models)
  • Find items further away with the help of hundreds of millions of Apple devices in the Find My network

Compare Apple Airtags products

Price From: - From: -
Ratings
Splash, Water, and Dust Resistance Rated IP67 (maximum depth of 1 meter up to 30 minutes) under IEC standard 60529 Rated IP67 (maximum depth of 1 meter up to 30 minutes) under IEC standard 60529
Connectivity Bluetooth 5.0 for proximity finding Apple-designed U1 chip for Ultra Wideband and Precision Finding NFC tap for Lost Mode Bluetooth 5.0 for proximity finding Apple-designed U1 chip for Ultra Wideband and Precision Finding NFC tap for Lost Mode
Speaker Built-in speaker Built-in speaker
Battery User-replaceable CR2032 coin cell battery User-replaceable CR2032 coin cell battery
Sensor Accelerometer Accelerometer

Technical Details

Apple airtag (4-pack).

AirTags with CR2032 coin cell battery installed, Documentation

Make AirTag yours with a range of colorful accessories, sold separtely

Precision Finding compatible with iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12 Pro, iPhone 12 Pro Max, iPHone 13 mini, iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Pro, iPhone 13 Pro Max, iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Plus, iPhone 14 Pro, iPhone 14 Pro Max, iPhone 15, iPhone 15 Plus, iPhone 15 Pro and iPhone 15 Pro Max. Testing conducted by Apple in March 2021 using preproduction AirTag units and software paired with iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max, iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max units running preproduction software. Battery life based on an everyday use of four play sound events and one Precision Finding event per day. Battery life varies with usage, environmental conditions, replacement battery manufacturer and many other factors; actual results will vary.

AirTag is splash, water, and dust resistant and was tested under controlled laboratory conditions with a rating of IP67 under IEC standard 60529 (maximum depth of 1 meter up to 30 minutes). Splash, water, and dust resistance are not permanent conditions and resistance might decrease as a result of normal wear. Refer to the Safety and Handling documentation for cleaning and drying instructions.

Requires iPhone SE, iPhone 6s or later, or iPod touch (7th generation) with iOS 14.5 or later, or iPad Pro, iPad (5th generation or later), iPad Air 2 or later, or iPad mini 4 or later with iPadOS 14.5 or later.

Bluetooth 5.0 for proximity finding Apple-designed U1 chip for Ultra Wideband and Precision Finding NFC tap for Lost Mode

Built-in speaker

Make AirTag yours with a range of colorful accessories, sold separtely

User-replaceable CR2032 coin cell battery

Accelerometer

1.26 inches (31.9 mm)

0.31 inches (8 mm)

0.39 ounces (11 g)

Looking for specific info?

Customer reviews.

4 star 0%
3 star 0%
2 star 0%

Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness.

  • Sort reviews by Top reviews Most recent Top reviews

Top review from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. please try again later..

plan 75 movie reviews

  • About Amazon
  • Investor Relations
  • Amazon Devices
  • Amazon Science
  • Sell products on Amazon
  • Sell on Amazon Business
  • Sell apps on Amazon
  • Become an Affiliate
  • Advertise Your Products
  • Self-Publish with Us
  • Host an Amazon Hub
  • › See More Make Money with Us
  • Amazon Business Card
  • Shop with Points
  • Reload Your Balance
  • Amazon Currency Converter
  • Amazon and COVID-19
  • Your Account
  • Your Orders
  • Shipping Rates & Policies
  • Returns & Replacements
  • Manage Your Content and Devices
 
 
 
   
  • Conditions of Use
  • Privacy Notice
  • Consumer Health Data Privacy Disclosure
  • Your Ads Privacy Choices

plan 75 movie reviews

IMAGES

  1. The Movie Waffler

    plan 75 movie reviews

  2. Critique film

    plan 75 movie reviews

  3. Plan 75 Review: A Haunting Reflection of Aging and Good Grace

    plan 75 movie reviews

  4. Review: Plan 75

    plan 75 movie reviews

  5. Plan 75 movie review & film summary (2023)

    plan 75 movie reviews

  6. Plan 75 review

    plan 75 movie reviews

VIDEO

  1. PREM RATAN DHAN PAYO 2015 Full Movie

  2. THE RETIREMENT PLAN had SOME benefits. Movie Review

  3. Ravi Teja 75 Movie Update 🥳 #rt75 #movieupdate #raviteja

COMMENTS

  1. Plan 75 movie review & film summary (2023)

    The tone is too delicate to fully swing into horror, although Hayakawa and composer Rémi Boubal use nerve-shredding minor-key strings in the score. A violent hate crime in the opening scene takes place off camera, and the film's most horrific revelation—that Plan 75 is selling "clients'" ashes to a recycling company for profit ...

  2. 'Plan 75' Review: Leaving Early

    By Nicolas Rapold. April 20, 2023. Plan 75. Directed by Chie Hayakawa. Drama, Sci-Fi. 1h 53m. Find Tickets. When you purchase a ticket for an independently reviewed film through our site, we earn ...

  3. Plan 75

    94% Tomatometer 52 Reviews 82% Audience Score Fewer than 50 Ratings In a near dystopian future, Japan's government launches PLAN 75, a program encouraging the elderly to terminate their own lives ...

  4. 'Plan 75' review: Dystopian drama takes on mass suicide

    Review: In the eerie dystopia of 'Plan 75,' a mass suicide program takes effect. Chieko Baisho in the movie "Plan 75.". (KimStim) By Justin Chang Film Critic. May 4, 2023 3:30 PM PT. In ...

  5. Plan 75 (2022)

    Plan 75: Directed by Chie Hayakawa. With Chieko Baishô, Hayato Isomura, Stefanie Arianne, Taka Takao. Government program Plan 75 encourages senior citizens to be euthanized to remedy an aged society. An elderly woman whose means of survival are vanishing, a pragmatic Plan 75 salesman, and a Filipino laborer face choices of life and death.

  6. Plan 75 Review: Haunting Japanese Film Offers Clear Vision ...

    April 19, 2023 2:00 pm. "Plan 75". KimStim. On July 26, 2016, a 26-year-old ex-employee of a Japanese care home for intellectually and mentally disabled people broke into his former place of work ...

  7. 'Plan 75' Review: Japanese Film Scolds Us for Disrespecting Seniors

    Cannes Film Festival, Plan 75, Toronto Film Festival. Jump to Comments. 'Plan 75' Review: Japan's Thought-Provoking Oscar Submission Chides Society for Disrespecting Its Seniors. Reviewed at ...

  8. Plan 75

    Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | May 11, 2023. Pieter-Jan Van Haecke Psychocinematography. With Plan 75, Hayakawa hauntingly confronts the spectator with what would happen if the existence of ...

  9. Plan 75 Review: A Haunting Reflection of Aging and Good Grace

    Recent Movie Reviews from Cinephile Corner. Touch Movie Review (1997) Challengers Movie Review (2024) Air Movie Review (2023) Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), a young Plan 75 salesman, represents the moral gray areas of this dystopia.He believes in the program's supposed benefits, yet struggles with the personal cost of selling death.

  10. 'Plan 75': Cannes Review

    'Plan 75': Cannes Review By Tim Grierson, Senior US Critic 2022-05-20T16:13:00+01:00 This dystopian debut about aging and euthanasia in Japan is moving and understated

  11. 'Plan 75' Review: A Quietly Tragic Depiction of Solitude and Social Cruelty

    Plan 75. Review: A Quietly Tragic Depiction of a World Where Empathy Is Scarce. Hayakawa Chie reveals a culture that seems almost mobilized to destroy its own soul. Hayakawa Chie's Plan 75 depicts Japan as necro-political dystopia where the elderly are encouraged to euthanize themselves in order to assuage the nation's economic distress.

  12. 'Plan 75' Review: Cannes Film Festival

    Cannes Review: Chie Hayakawa's 'Plan 75'. "Plan 75" Urban Sales. A diet of rice and tofu, plenty of regular, gentle exercise and excellent hospitals: the Japanese have nailed the formula for ...

  13. 'Plan 75': A chilling look at a callous future society

    Chie Hayakawa's "Plan 75" puts a realistic spin on the dystopian scenarios of 1970s sci-fi movies like "Soylent Green" and "Logan's Run," and is all the more chilling for it.

  14. Plan 75 Review: Chie Hayakawa Creates A Quietly Subversive ...

    This question is at the core of "Plan 75," the debut film of Japanese director Chie Hayakawa. The soft-spoken drama imagines a near-future dystopia where Japan's super-aged society has strained ...

  15. Plan 75 film review

    The low-tech sci-fi film Plan 75 posits a near future where, after a spate of hate crimes against the elderly, Japan offers its citizens a drastic way to deal with its rapidly ageing population ...

  16. Plan 75 review: a resonant lesson in humanism

    With Plan 75, director Hayakawa Chie begins her feature film career by posing a moral question about the end of life. In her imagining, the Japanese government, following a spate of hate crimes against the elderly, introduces an opt-in-euthanasia scheme, 'Plan 75', for those aged 75 and above. Hayakawa's remarkably muted way of rendering ...

  17. Plan 75: Quietly Profound Humanist Tale

    MIFF 2022: Plan 75 Review "It's hard to hold your head up in a place like this. It looks like we're clinging to life." In a not-so-distant future, the Japanese government has taken steps to try and offset their aging population and put a stop to a string of violent ageist crimes; the titular Plan 75.The brilliant direction of Chie Hayakawa expands upon a short film she contributed to ...

  18. Cannes: 'Plan 75' Gives Speculative Sci-Fi the Social Realist Treatment

    Cannes Hidden Gem: Speculative Sci-Fi Gets the Social Realist Treatment in 'Plan 75' Shocked by a dwindling sense of empathy in her native Japan, director Chie Hayakawa imagines a trenchant ...

  19. Plan 75 review

    Plan 75. Anticipation. It does sound like it could almost be real, which lends this speculative drama genuine intrigue. Enjoyment. Involving and understated, though it tails off towards the end. In Retrospect. A film of haunting unease, but not perhaps the complete package. Chie Hayakawa's dystopian drama about a government-sponsored ...

  20. PLAN 75

    (Check out Jack Schenker's movie review of Plan 75, it's in theaters now.Seen it? Join the conversation with HtN on our Letterboxd Page.) The new Japanese arthouse gem Plan 75 sucks you into its dystopian world with a fascinating premise: citizens over 75 may opt into government funded euthanasia in exchange for $1,000. Director Chie Hayakawa (who I also interviewed) has created an ...

  21. Plan 75

    Plan 75 is a 2022 drama film directed by Chie Hayakawa, starring Chieko Baisho, Hayato Isomura and Stefanie Arianne. In a dystopian alternate reality, the Japanese government creates a program called "Plan 75" that offers free euthanasia services to all Japanese citizens 75 and older in order to deal with its rapidly aging population.

  22. Plan 75

    Kimstim Films. 1 h 53 m. Summary Government program Plan 75 encourages senior citizens to be euthanized to remedy an aged society. An elderly woman whose means of survival are vanishing, a pragmatic Plan 75 salesman, and a Filipino laborer face choices of life and death. Drama.

  23. What To Do With Old Things: a review of 'Plan 75'

    Absolutely quiet and still, ' Plan 75 ' is a chilling look into a dystopian world where Japan has found a startling way to handle its growing elderly population: a government program that offers assisted suicide to all citizens aged 75 and above. The program itself, the titular Plan 75, offers a cash handout for the volunteers to do with as ...

  24. The Plan to Take Down All For One in MHA Season 7, Explained

    The united pro heroes and UA students tried to fight the Paranormal Liberation Front in a massive clash of army vs army back in My Hero Academia's 6th season, but the results were mixed at best.Plenty of villains were captured, but many pro heroes got themselves badly injured or even killed, and some gave up their careers in despair after that battle.

  25. Thelma review: "June Squibb's wily gran-with-a-plan turns this elder

    June Squibb's warm but wily gran-with-a-plan turns this elder-scam revenge spree into a winning comedy. Why you can trust GamesRadar+ Our experts review games, movies and tech over countless ...

  26. These are the dirtiest lakes in Oklahoma

    Good morning, Oklahoma! Here's what you need to know today: 🌞 Temperature check: Mostly sunny with a high of 96 and a low of 73, according to AccuWeather. 📅 Today in History: In 1804, a duel between then U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton in Weehawken, New Jersey, ended with Hamilton being fatally wounded. The duel was a culmination of a longstanding hostility between ...

  27. 'Hannah Berner: We Ride At Dawn' Netflix Special Review ...

    For her debut comedy hour, Berner, 32, jokes about marrying an older man (48-year-old stand-up comedian Des Bishop), the lack of realism in movie sex scenes, and how depression, romance and ...

  28. Peacock Streaming: Pricing, Plans, and How to Sign up

    Peacock is NBC's streaming service with sports, movies, and shows like "The Office." Plans start at $6/month, but an increase is coming in July.

  29. 'Wild Wild Punjab' Netflix Review: Stream It Or Skip It?

    Stream It Or Skip It: 'Wild Wild Punjab' on Netflix, A Slapstick Hindi-Language Road Trip Movie Road trip movies have been around forever, whether it's...

  30. Amazon.com: Apple AirTag 4 pack : Electronics

    Product Eligibility: Plan must be purchased with a product or within 30 days of the product purchase. Pre-existing conditions are not covered. Terms & Details: More information about this protection plan is available within the "Product guides and documents" section. Simply click "User Guide" for more info.