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Essay Writing Lesson PowerPoint

Essay Writing Lesson PowerPoint

Subject: English

Age range: 11-14

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

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Last updated

20 October 2022

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Teaching the A-B-C’s of essay writing? This comprehensive, student-friendly 46-slide PowerPoint is all you need to yield the results you want. With a focus on the five paragraph essay, product addresses organizational patterns, transitional phrases, signal words, the hook, and proofreading checklist and tips. Includes an essay example, writing prompts, and a graphic organizer to use throughout the entire year. Your students will love this as much as you, as they take on the craft of writing like never before. Perfect for standardized writing prep and an effective foundation for high school, college, and beyond.

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Can You Convince Me? Developing Persuasive Writing

essay writing powerpoint for middle school

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Persuasive writing is an important skill that can seem intimidating to elementary students. This lesson encourages students to use skills and knowledge they may not realize they already have. A classroom game introduces students to the basic concepts of lobbying for something that is important to them (or that they want) and making persuasive arguments. Students then choose their own persuasive piece to analyze and learn some of the definitions associated with persuasive writing. Once students become aware of the techniques used in oral arguments, they then apply them to independent persuasive writing activities and analyze the work of others to see if it contains effective persuasive techniques.

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From theory to practice.

  • Students can discover for themselves how much they already know about constructing persuasive arguments by participating in an exercise that is not intimidating.  
  • Progressing from spoken to written arguments will help students become better readers of persuasive texts.

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Materials and Technology

  • Computers with Internet access  
  • PowerPoint  
  • LCD projector (optional)  
  • Chart paper or chalkboard  
  • Sticky notes  
  • Persuasive Strategy Presentation
  • Persuasion Is All Around You  
  • Persuasive Strategy Definitions  
  • Check the Strategies  
  • Check the Strategy  
  • Observations and Notes  
  • Persuasive Writing Assessment

Preparation

Student objectives.

Students will

  • Work in cooperative groups to brainstorm ideas and organize them into a cohesive argument to be presented to the class  
  • Gain knowledge of the different strategies that are used in effective persuasive writing  
  • Use a graphic organizer to help them begin organizing their ideas into written form  
  • Apply what they have learned to write a persuasive piece that expresses their stance and reasoning in a clear, logical sequence  
  • Develop oral presentation skills by presenting their persuasive writing pieces to the class  
  • Analyze the work of others to see if it contains effective persuasive techniques

Session 1: The Game of Persuasion

Home/School Connection: Distribute Persuasion Is All Around You . Students are to find an example of a persuasive piece from the newspaper, television, radio, magazine, or billboards around town and be ready to report back to class during Session 2. Provide a selection of magazines or newspapers with advertisements for students who may not have materials at home. For English-language learners (ELLs), it may be helpful to show examples of advertisements and articles in newspapers and magazines.

Session 2: Analysis of an Argument

Home/School Connection: Ask students to revisit their persuasive piece from Persuasion Is All Around You . This time they will use Check the Strategies to look for the persuasive strategies that the creator of the piece incorporated. Check for understanding with your ELLs and any special needs students. It may be helpful for them to talk through their persuasive piece with you or a peer before taking it home for homework. Arrange a time for any student who may not have the opportunity to complete assignments outside of school to work with you, a volunteer, or another adult at school on the assignment.

Session 3: Persuasive Writing

Session 4: presenting the persuasive writing.

  • Endangered Species: Persuasive Writing offers a way to integrate science with persuasive writing. Have students pretend that they are reporters and have to convince people to think the way they do. Have them pick issues related to endangered species, use the Persuasion Map as a prewriting exercise, and write essays trying to convince others of their points of view. In addition, the lesson “Persuasive Essay: Environmental Issues” can be adapted for your students as part of this exercise.  
  • Have students write persuasive arguments for a special class event, such as an educational field trip or an in-class educational movie. Reward the class by arranging for the class event suggested in one of the essays.

Student Assessment / Reflections

  • Compare your Observations and Notes from Session 4 and Session 1 to see if students understand the persuasive strategies, use any new persuasive strategies, seem to be overusing a strategy, or need more practice refining the use of a strategy. Offer them guidance and practice as needed.  
  • Collect both homework assignments and the Check the Strategy sheets and assess how well students understand the different elements of persuasive writing and how they are applied.  
  • Collect students’ Persuasion Maps and use them and your discussions during conferences to see how well students understand how to use the persuasive strategies and are able to plan their essays. You want to look also at how well they are able to make changes from the map to their finished essays.  
  • Use the Persuasive Writing Assessment to evaluate the essays students wrote during Session 3.
  • Calendar Activities
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  • Student Interactives

The Persuasion Map is an interactive graphic organizer that enables students to map out their arguments for a persuasive essay or debate.

This interactive tool allows students to create Venn diagrams that contain two or three overlapping circles, enabling them to organize their information logically.

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Literacy Ideas

Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers

Essay Writing Guide

P LANNING, PARAGRAPHING AND POLISHING: FINE-TUNING THE PERFECT ESSAY

Essay writing is an essential skill for every student. Whether writing a particular academic essay (such as persuasive, narrative, descriptive, or expository) or a timed exam essay, the key to getting good at writing is to write. Creating opportunities for our students to engage in extended writing activities will go a long way to helping them improve their skills as scribes.

But, putting the hours in alone will not be enough to attain the highest levels in essay writing. Practice must be meaningful. Once students have a broad overview of how to structure the various types of essays, they are ready to narrow in on the minor details that will enable them to fine-tune their work as a lean vehicle of their thoughts and ideas.

Visual Writing Prompts

In this article, we will drill down to some aspects that will assist students in taking their essay writing skills up a notch. Many ideas and activities can be integrated into broader lesson plans based on essay writing. Often, though, they will work effectively in isolation – just as athletes isolate physical movements to drill that are relevant to their sport. When these movements become second nature, they can be repeated naturally in the context of the game or in our case, the writing of the essay.

THE ULTIMATE NONFICTION TEACHING RESOURCE

essay writing | nonfiction writing unit | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

  • 270  pages of the most effective teaching strategies
  • 50+   digital tools  ready right out of the box
  • 75   editable resources  for student   differentiation  
  • Loads of   tricks and tips  to add to your teaching tool bag
  • All explanations are reinforced with  concrete examples.
  • Links to  high-quality video  tutorials
  • Clear objectives  easy to match to the demands of your curriculum

Planning an essay

essay writing | how to prepare for an essay | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

The Boys Scouts’ motto is famously ‘Be Prepared’. It’s a solid motto that can be applied to most aspects of life; essay writing is no different. Given the purpose of an essay is generally to present a logical and reasoned argument, investing time in organising arguments, ideas, and structure would seem to be time well spent.

Given that essays can take a wide range of forms and that we all have our own individual approaches to writing, it stands to reason that there will be no single best approach to the planning stage of essay writing. That said, there are several helpful hints and techniques we can share with our students to help them wrestle their ideas into a writable form. Let’s take a look at a few of the best of these:

BREAK THE QUESTION DOWN: UNDERSTAND YOUR ESSAY TOPIC.

Whether students are tackling an assignment that you have set for them in class or responding to an essay prompt in an exam situation, they should get into the habit of analyzing the nature of the task. To do this, they should unravel the question’s meaning or prompt. Students can practice this in class by responding to various essay titles, questions, and prompts, thereby gaining valuable experience breaking these down.

Have students work in groups to underline and dissect the keywords and phrases and discuss what exactly is being asked of them in the task. Are they being asked to discuss, describe, persuade, or explain? Understanding the exact nature of the task is crucial before going any further in the planning process, never mind the writing process .

BRAINSTORM AND MIND MAP WHAT YOU KNOW:

Once students have understood what the essay task asks them, they should consider what they know about the topic and, often, how they feel about it. When teaching essay writing, we so often emphasize that it is about expressing our opinions on things, but for our younger students what they think about something isn’t always obvious, even to themselves.

Brainstorming and mind-mapping what they know about a topic offers them an opportunity to uncover not just what they already know about a topic, but also gives them a chance to reveal to themselves what they think about the topic. This will help guide them in structuring their research and, later, the essay they will write . When writing an essay in an exam context, this may be the only ‘research’ the student can undertake before the writing, so practicing this will be even more important.

RESEARCH YOUR ESSAY

The previous step above should reveal to students the general direction their research will take. With the ubiquitousness of the internet, gone are the days of students relying on a single well-thumbed encyclopaedia from the school library as their sole authoritative source in their essay. If anything, the real problem for our students today is narrowing down their sources to a manageable number. Students should use the information from the previous step to help here. At this stage, it is important that they:

●      Ensure the research material is directly relevant to the essay task

●      Record in detail the sources of the information that they will use in their essay

●      Engage with the material personally by asking questions and challenging their own biases

●      Identify the key points that will be made in their essay

●      Group ideas, counterarguments, and opinions together

●      Identify the overarching argument they will make in their own essay.

Once these stages have been completed the student is ready to organise their points into a logical order.

WRITING YOUR ESSAY

There are a number of ways for students to organize their points in preparation for writing. They can use graphic organizers , post-it notes, or any number of available writing apps. The important thing for them to consider here is that their points should follow a logical progression. This progression of their argument will be expressed in the form of body paragraphs that will inform the structure of their finished essay.

The number of paragraphs contained in an essay will depend on a number of factors such as word limits, time limits, the complexity of the question etc. Regardless of the essay’s length, students should ensure their essay follows the Rule of Three in that every essay they write contains an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Generally speaking, essay paragraphs will focus on one main idea that is usually expressed in a topic sentence that is followed by a series of supporting sentences that bolster that main idea. The first and final sentences are of the most significance here with the first sentence of a paragraph making the point to the reader and the final sentence of the paragraph making the overall relevance to the essay’s argument crystal clear. 

Though students will most likely be familiar with the broad generic structure of essays, it is worth investing time to ensure they have a clear conception of how each part of the essay works, that is, of the exact nature of the task it performs. Let’s review:

Common Essay Structure

Introduction: Provides the reader with context for the essay. It states the broad argument that the essay will make and informs the reader of the writer’s general perspective and approach to the question.

Body Paragraphs: These are the ‘meat’ of the essay and lay out the argument stated in the introduction point by point with supporting evidence.

Conclusion: Usually, the conclusion will restate the central argument while summarising the essay’s main supporting reasons before linking everything back to the original question.

ESSAY WRITING PARAGRAPH WRITING TIPS

essay writing | 1 How to write paragraphs | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

●      Each paragraph should focus on a single main idea

●      Paragraphs should follow a logical sequence; students should group similar ideas together to avoid incoherence

●      Paragraphs should be denoted consistently; students should choose either to indent or skip a line

●      Transition words and phrases such as alternatively , consequently , in contrast should be used to give flow and provide a bridge between paragraphs.

HOW TO EDIT AN ESSAY

essay writing | essay editing tips | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

Students shouldn’t expect their essays to emerge from the writing process perfectly formed. Except in exam situations and the like, thorough editing is an essential aspect in the writing process. 

Often, students struggle with this aspect of the process the most. After spending hours of effort on planning, research, and writing the first draft, students can be reluctant to go back over the same terrain they have so recently travelled. It is important at this point to give them some helpful guidelines to help them to know what to look out for. The following tips will provide just such help: 

One Piece at a Time: There is a lot to look out for in the editing process and often students overlook aspects as they try to juggle too many balls during the process. One effective strategy to combat this is for students to perform a number of rounds of editing with each focusing on a different aspect. For example, the first round could focus on content, the second round on looking out for word repetition (use a thesaurus to help here), with the third attending to spelling and grammar.

Sum It Up: When reviewing the paragraphs they have written, a good starting point is for students to read each paragraph and attempt to sum up its main point in a single line. If this is not possible, their readers will most likely have difficulty following their train of thought too and the paragraph needs to be overhauled.

Let It Breathe: When possible, encourage students to allow some time for their essay to ‘breathe’ before returning to it for editing purposes. This may require some skilful time management on the part of the student, for example, a student rush-writing the night before the deadline does not lend itself to effective editing. Fresh eyes are one of the sharpest tools in the writer’s toolbox.

Read It Aloud: This time-tested editing method is a great way for students to identify mistakes and typos in their work. We tend to read things more slowly when reading aloud giving us the time to spot errors. Also, when we read silently our minds can often fill in the gaps or gloss over the mistakes that will become apparent when we read out loud.

Phone a Friend: Peer editing is another great way to identify errors that our brains may miss when reading our own work. Encourage students to partner up for a little ‘you scratch my back, I scratch yours’.

Use Tech Tools: We need to ensure our students have the mental tools to edit their own work and for this they will need a good grasp of English grammar and punctuation. However, there are also a wealth of tech tools such as spellcheck and grammar checks that can offer a great once-over option to catch anything students may have missed in earlier editing rounds.

essay writing | Perfect essay writing for students | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

Putting the Jewels on Display: While some struggle to edit, others struggle to let go. There comes a point when it is time for students to release their work to the reader. They must learn to relinquish control after the creation is complete. This will be much easier to achieve if the student feels that they have done everything in their control to ensure their essay is representative of the best of their abilities and if they have followed the advice here, they should be confident they have done so.

WRITING CHECKLISTS FOR ALL TEXT TYPES

writing checklists

ESSAY WRITING video tutorials

essay writing | essay writing tutorial28129 | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

The content for this page has been written by Shane Mac Donnchaidh.  A former principal of an international school and English university lecturer with 15 years of teaching and administration experience. Shane’s latest Book, The Complete Guide to Nonfiction Writing , can be found here.  Editing and support for this article have been provided by the literacyideas team.

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essay writing powerpoint for middle school

Argumentative Writing PowerPoint and Notes for Middle School ELA

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Argumentative writing will be a lot easier to teach with this step-by-step interactive PowerPoint presentation and guided notes resource for middle school students. It tackles the challenges of argument writing and breaks everything down, making it a lot easier for kids to understand.

Now, when I tell my students we’re working on this unit, they cheer! Kids LOVE to “argue,” and when they learn the right way to present their findings, their essays can really pack a punch.

Use the PowerPoint presentation to teach, while your students take notes on the guided notes pages. The unit is totally interactive. Your students will be actively engaged, writing and sharing information verbally, the entire time.

This unit can be used with the following unit:  Argumentative Essay Writing  for middle school students. Or it can be used independently.

Included are the following: ★ Instructions for use ★ PowerPoint show & presentation ★ Student notes ★ Argumentative writing terminology ★ Sample passages ★ Real-life argument example (designed for kids/teens) ★ Writing an introductory paragraph ★ Six types of lead or “hook” ★ Writing the thesis/claim ★ Writing and organizing the main body paragraphs ★ Writing a counterargument and turn-back ★ Writing a concluding paragraph ★ Using transition and text reference words and phrases ★ Organization templates And More!

You might like these other writing units: ♦  Argumentative, Narrative, and Informational Writing Workshop Bundle {CCSS} ♦  Informational Essay Writing ♦  Narrative Writing Workshop ♦  Poetry: Close Reading Posters, Handouts, and Bookmarks Pack ♦  Poetry: Close Reading Step by Step Strategies for Success ♦  Book Report and Craftivity for Fiction: The Exploding Box ♦  Close Reading Strategy for ALL Subjects: ELA, Social Studies, Science, and More ♦  How to Write an Essay Requiring Text Based Details

Thank you and enjoy! Darlene

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Engaging Writing Prompts for Middle School Students

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Nurturing creativity is essential to help middle school students explore their potential and prepare for future challenges. One effective method of promoting creativity in the classroom is through engaging writing prompts. These prompts not only spark imaginative thinking but also enhance skills, such as world-building, descriptive language, and point of view.

While writing prompts can be used with all grade levels, middle school is a prime opportunity to use them to bridge foundational skills and knowledge learned in elementary school with critical thinking and analysis that will be used in high school. Middle school students are at an age in their learning where they can explore creativity and writing in a setting that primes them for the higher level of thinking that will come in later years. The benefits of using writing prompts in middle school validates the argument that they should be regularly integrated into the curriculum throughout the school year. Here, we’ll explore the different benefits of writing prompts, engaging writing activities, and even specific writing prompts that can be used with young writers.  

The Role of Writing Prompts

Writing prompts are brief, thought-provoking statements or questions that inspire students to write clearly and creatively. They serve as the ignition for the creative fire within students, encouraging them to explore new horizons through writing. Writing prompts for middle school students also serve as invaluable tools for fostering literacy skills .

Writing prompts, such as creative writing prompts and personal journal prompts , offer a structured framework within which students can explore a wide range of writing ideas and literacy skills. For example, fun writing prompts can be used as hooks or bellringers to engage students in creative and critical thinking before reading a challenging text.

In addition to playing a role in general classroom instruction, writing prompts can also be used in reading and writing interventions. For example, teachers can provide students who may need extra guidance with sentence starters or story starters to help guide analysis or jumpstart creativity. 

Unlocking Creativity Through Engaging Writing Prompts

Writing prompts can also be used for informative and explanatory writing but as discussed already, they play a pivotal role in fostering creativity. In fact, engaging writing prompts are a powerful tool that can unlock the doors to imaginative thinking and self-expression. Let’s take a closer look at the creative benefits of using engaging writing prompts :

Encouraging Imagination and Originality : Writing prompts challenge students to think beyond the ordinary and come up with original ideas. By exploring diverse topics, they can tap into their unique perspectives and unleash their creativity. 

Inspiring Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Skills : Some writing prompts present real-life situations or dilemmas, prompting students to analyze and devise solutions. This process nurtures critical thinking abilities, preparing students for future problem-solving challenges.

Promoting Emotional Expression and Empathy : Writing prompts that evoke emotions encourage students to express their feelings and develop empathy toward others. This emotional exploration contributes to their holistic growth as individuals.

Enhancing Communication and Language Abilities : As students respond to writing prompts, they refine their communication skills, learning how to articulate their thoughts effectively. Additionally, they expand their vocabulary and command of the language.

Reinforced Reading Skills : Effective writing prompts can be used to support reading instruction and intervention as well. According to Dr. Jason DeHart in Connecting to the Written Word: Intentional Writing with Older Readers , “Older readers are also keenly aware of their own need for additional support, which can result in avoidance behaviors. Teachers who invite students to comfortably engage in writing and composing can gain knowledge of and build relationships with students who would otherwise stay ‘under the radar.’” From techniques like dialogic reading with young readers to intentional writing with older readers, an integrative approach to reading and writing deepens skill levels and understanding.

Integrating Writing Prompts in the Middle School Curriculum

Integrating creativity and self-expression into the curriculum is a fundamental aspect of nurturing well-rounded and confident individuals. Therefore, the integration of writing prompts in the middle school curriculum is not just about fostering better writers; it’s about empowering students to become effective communicators, critical thinkers, and confident individuals.

Writing prompts can be designed to align with educational standards, ensuring they contribute to the overall learning objectives. Writing prompts can also be tailored to various subjects, making them a versatile tool across the curriculum. 

One of the main concepts that writing reinforces is reading. In The Writing Rope: A Framework for Evidence-Based Writing Instruction podcast episode, Joan Sedita, founder of Keys to Literacy and author of The Writing Rope , explores the notion that writing is a task as complex and multifaceted as reading—but it’s often taught as a single skill. Sedita states, “There is this relationship between reading and writing. And what I found in writing this ( The Writing Rope ) and in the professional development work that I do, is that many of the components that we need to teach to students, skills, strategies, are things that also usually support their reading comprehension.” This is just another reason why writing prompts need to be a foundational part of middle school curriculum. 

Writing Prompt Activities for Middle School Students

Here, we’ve included a list of different writing activities, as well as a specific prompt that can be used with each idea.

Diverse Genre Exploration

Writing prompt activities expose middle school students to various literary genres. This diversity broadens their understanding of the written word and empowers them to find their unique writing voice. 

Some genres students can explore include imaginative fiction, personal reflection, mystery and suspense, historical fiction, and poetry and verse. Through these, students can develop the ability to craft suspenseful plots, create vibrant characters, and build intricate worlds that captivate readers’ imaginations. Moreover, as they step into genres like poetry, they can embrace the rhythmic cadence of language, painting emotions and experiences with words in a way that resonates deeply.

PROMPT : Imagine you have the opportunity to blend two different genres together to create a brand-new story. Choose any two genres (e.g., fantasy, mystery, science fiction, historical fiction, romance, adventure, horror) and combine them in a creative and unexpected way. Write a short story that incorporates elements from both genres.

Imagination Ignited

Prompts that delve into fantastical scenarios, futuristic worlds, or magical realms stimulate students’ imaginations. This activity is especially important for exploring the five senses and having students practice the writing skill of showing, not telling. 

PROMPT : Close your eyes and imagine stepping into an enchanted forest. This forest is no ordinary place—it’s a realm of magic, mystery, and unexpected wonders. As you venture deeper into the forest, describe what you see, hear, and feel. What kind of magical creatures do you encounter? Are there hidden secrets waiting to be discovered? 

Real-Life Relevance

Some prompts present real-life situations or dilemmas relevant to middle school students. Writing about familiar experiences allows students to relate more deeply to the subject matter and encourages them to reflect on their daily lives, maybe even stirring up a favorite memory.

Writing prompt exercises for middle school students go well beyond the boundaries of the classroom, incorporating real-world applicability into the educational process. These activities work as vibrant platforms that help students develop their literary abilities while also forging significant connections with their surroundings. 

PROMPT : Imagine you are a young inventor with a mission to create innovative solutions for a more sustainable future. Choose one real-world environmental challenge, such as plastic pollution, energy conservation, water scarcity, or air quality. Write a persuasive essay explaining your inventive solution to address this challenge. Consider how your solution could make a positive impact on the environment and inspire positive change.

Visual Prompts

Visual prompts, such as pictures or videos, act as powerful catalysts for creativity. These stimuli spark inspiration and help students visualize their ideas, leading to descriptive and vivid writing. A few popular visual prompts for middle school students include: enchanted forest, desert island, abandoned amusement park, hidden doorway, and journey through a wormhole.

PROMPT : Examine the image of a person discovering an object in an unexpected place. It depicts a person stumbling upon an unexpected object in an unlikely place. Write a short story inspired by this limited imagery. Consider who the person is, what the object is, and how they react to this surprising discovery.

Character Building

Writing prompts that focus on character development allow students to create intricate and relatable personas. This activity fosters empathy and an understanding of human emotions and behaviors. Some activities include empathy exploration, personal heroes, character evolution, reflective essays, and acts of kindness narratives. Whether reflecting on real people, analyzing fictional characters, or creating characters of their own, students can think both creatively and critically about the people they experience in the world around them as well as their own character traits. 

PROMPT : Imagine a character who faces a situation that requires immense courage. This could be standing up to a bully, facing a fear, or defending a friend. Write a short story that follows this character’s journey as they navigate their fear and find the inner strength to overcome the challenge. Explore their thoughts, emotions, and the growth they experience along the way.

Time Travel Through History

Historical writing prompts transport students to different eras, enabling them to experience the past through the eyes of historical figures. Such activities blend storytelling with historical context, making history come alive. This offers middle school students a portal to the past and an opportunity to connect with the people and events that have shaped our world. Students can transport themselves to the courts of ancient civilizations, walk alongside figures of significance, and experience pivotal events that have left an indelible mark.

PROMPT : Imagine you have a time machine that can transport you to any ancient civilization in history. Choose a specific civilization (e.g., Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, the Mayan Civilization) and write a detailed account of a day in the life of a young person living during that time. Describe their surroundings, daily activities, challenges, and interactions with others. What do they eat? What do they wear? What adventures do they embark on? 

Writing in Different Tenses and Points of View

Writing prompt activities that require students to experiment with different tenses and points of view expand their narrative skills. From the immediacy of the present tense to the reflective nature of the past tense, and even the speculative intrigue of the future tense, each tense holds a unique charm that can transform a narrative’s tone and texture. This practice prepares them for tackling complex storytelling techniques.

The choice of point of view shapes the reader’s connection to characters and events. Middle school students can experiment with different perspectives, forging intimate bonds or granting omniscient insight that illuminate the narrative in distinct ways. As they use writing prompt activities, let students explore tenses and perspectives. For example, students may be asked to write from the perspective of a best friend, family member, famous person, or main character. By doing so, they not only refine their writing skills but also cultivate empathy for others, new facts or information, and an appreciation for the language.

PROMPT : Write a short story about an unforgettable adventure. Start by describing the adventure in the first person, using the present tense to immerse the reader in the moment. Then, switch to the third person and past tense to recount the same adventure from an outsider’s perspective. Compare the two versions, considering how the choice of tense and point of view impacts the reader’s experience.

Nature and Environmental Themes

Writing prompts inspired by nature and environmental themes promote ecological awareness and encourage students to contemplate their relationship with the natural world. Some nature and environmental themes to spark imaginative writing activities for middle school students include eco-friendly adventures, a letter to future generations, an imaginary ecosystem, an unexpected encounter, and a day without technology.

PROMPT : Step into the shoes of a young explorer who enters a mystical forest known as “The Whispering Woods.” This forest is said to hold ancient secrets and a strong connection to nature. Write a short story that captures your journey through the woods, describing the sights, sounds, and encounters you experience.

The power of writing prompts for middle school students goes beyond honing writing skills; it encourages them to explore their thoughts, express their creativity, and develop a strong voice in the world of words. By providing a diverse array of prompts that resonate with their interests, challenges, and curiosities, educators can inspire young minds to embark on literary journeys filled with self-discovery and growth.

Voyager Sopris Learning’s writing instruction programs include engaging writing prompts and provide an explicit, multisensory approach to writing instruction. For example, Step Up to Writing ® instructional strategies help students understand the importance of each step in the writing process for increased writing success in all content areas. Download free Step Up to Writing lesson samples to explore the program.

Step Up To Writing

Research-Based Writing Instruction (Grades K–12)

  • Classroom Activities/Strategies/Guides

essay writing powerpoint for middle school

Bell Ringers

Writing authentic narratives in middle school.

essay writing powerpoint for middle school

  • Establishing a situation
  • Organized a logical event sequence
  • Describing scenes, objects or people
  • Developing characters’ personalities
  • Using dialogue as appropriate
  • Establishing a context 
  • Situating events in a time or place
  • Developing a point of view
  • Developing character motives

essay writing powerpoint for middle school

  • Read more about: Back to School , Middle School Writing

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Using Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Middle School ELA

Using Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Middle School ELA

Mentor Texts When and How To Use Them in Your ELA Lessons

Mentor Texts: When and How To Use Them in Your ELA Lessons

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essay writing powerpoint for middle school

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VIDEO

  1. 8.2 How To Write in Middle School

  2. 7.2 How To Write in Middle School

  3. How to Write an Essay: 4 Minute Step-by-step Guide

  4. Essay Writing

  5. 4th 5th Grade Topic: Planning for an essay (non-text based)

  6. Middle School informative essay:body paragraphs

COMMENTS

  1. Argumentative Essay Toolbox

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  2. Middle School Narrative Writing Made Simple

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  3. Essay Writing Lesson PowerPoint

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  6. How to Teach Argument Writing Step-By-Step

    I teach students how to write a step-by-step 5 paragraph argumentative essay consisting of the following: Introduction: Includes a lead/hook, background information about the topic, and a thesis statement that includes the claim. Body Paragraph #1: Introduces the first reason that the claim is valid. Supports that reason with facts, examples ...

  7. A Quick Guide to Teaching Any Middle School Academic Essay

    The academic essay is often largely subjective in terms of skill sequence and design involved in a unit plan. As I get the opportunity to work with more and more teachers, I find that this type of assignment is largely assigned based on the teacher's own personal learning experiences, the teacher's experiences with their mentor teacher, or ...

  8. Argumentative Essays PowerPoint Presentation

    Teach your students the basics of what makes a good argumentative essay through this downloadable PowerPoint presentation. What makes a good argumentative essay? Is it the topic itself? The passion of the author? The length of the text?

  9. Argumentative Writing Slideshow & Notes Middle School ELA PRINT ...

    Argumentative Writing Slideshow & Notes Middle School ELA PRINT & DIGITAL 4.8 (626 ratings) View Preview ; Grade Levels 6th - 9th, Homeschool Subjects English Language Arts, Writing, Writing-Essays Resource Type PowerPoint Presentations, Scaffolded Notes Standards CCSS W.6.1 CCSS W.6.1a CCSS W.6.1b CCSS W.6.1c CCSS W.6.1d show more Formats Included

  10. Results for five paragraph essay powerpoint

    Created by. Jumpstart Junior High. This Powerpoint is a step by step guide for students writing an introduction for a five paragraph essay. It includes a variety of examples for attention-getters, ways to link it to the thesis, and an overview of main ideas. Subjects: English Language Arts, Writing, Writing-Essays.

  11. Argumentative Writing PowerPoint and Notes for Middle School ELA

    Argumentative writing will be a lot easier to teach with this step-by-step interactive PowerPoint presentation and guided notes resource for middle school students. It tackles the challenges of argument writing and breaks everything down, making it a lot easier for kids to understand.

  12. Engaging Writing Prompts for Middle School Students

    The Role of Writing Prompts. Writing prompts are brief, thought-provoking statements or questions that inspire students to write clearly and creatively. They serve as the ignition for the creative fire within students, encouraging them to explore new horizons through writing. Writing prompts for middle school students also serve as invaluable ...

  13. Writing Authentic Narratives in Middle School

    Writing Authentic Narratives in Middle School. I recently finished writing Narratives with my 7th and 8th graders. I started planning for it weeks in advance because I wanted my students to have good, strong narratives. Here is what planning looked like at first ha! I have always done the "personal narrative" that most of us are familiar ...

  14. Middle school literary essay

    17. The Abstract While many literary analysis lessons assume that a student will regurgitate a literary critic or teacher's thesis, these lessons ask student readers and writers to actively engage in theory-building, claim-making, selecting and organizing evidence, and revising and editing. This four-step process models the writer's ...

  15. Expository Essay Presentation

    1st Paragraph (s) : Introductory Paragraph (s) Paragraph #2, 3, 4 etc.: Body Paragraphs Final Paragraph (s): Concluding Paragraph (s) FORMAT OF AN EXPOSITORY ESSAY Topic Sentences, Thesis...

  16. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    understand why it's worth writing that essay. A strong thesis will be arguable rather than descriptive, and it will be the right scope for the essay you are writing. If your thesis is descriptive, then you will not need to convince your readers of anything—you will be naming or summarizing something your readers can already see for themselves.

  17. Essay writing power_point 1

    Essay writing power_point 1. 1. Mr. Baumgartner's 10th Grade English Littlerock High School [email_address] .org. 2. Every essay has a beginning, a middle, and an end. In a five-paragraph essay, the first paragraph is called the introduction . The next three paragraphs consist of the body of the essay . The fifth and final paragraph is the ...

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  19. PDF Persuasive writing

    Make sure to support your position. 3 body paragraphs with innovative ideas (an example) Thesis: Uniform policies are beneficial in schools, and should be implemented nationwide. Reason 1: Allows for less bullying based on wardrobe. Reason 2: Students will concentrate more on the educational process and less on attire.

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